I may have to switch from Ford 6.2 to Ram 6.4 :'(

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
And this Is officially the stupidest reply to a reasonable question I've ever heard of.

The OP asked if 6.4 Hemi's still have an appetite for camshafts or not which I don't see being a stupid question.
I think the cam statement was an answer to me.

I kinda agree, nobody in 2020 should be replacing a camshaft in a remotely late model engine. IMO roller cam camshafts should last pretty much forever.
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
And this Is officially the stupidest reply to a reasonable question I've ever heard of.

The OP asked if 6.4 Hemi's still have an appetite for camshafts or not which I don't see being a stupid question.

As for his reason to trade maybe he doesn't want to do a 3 point turn during a snowstorm. Maybe he doesn't want his wife or kid's to do a 3 point turn during a snowstorm if they're driving his truck. Those hypothetical scenarios are not stupid either.

Considering a Cummins is not a bad idea to avoid potential 6.4 camshaft issue's but a diesel presents with it's own set of issues as well depending on how it's driven.
No. The OP is going to trade in a perfectly good truck because of a driveway switchback. It's not a three point turn in the middle of the interstate. And I have no idea why snow, or the lack of it would make any difference.

That is completely ridiculous. I've heard weirder reasons to take another $10k depreciation hit, but this one is a winner.
 

Bama67

Member
The specs I found from a search showed his turning circle about 15' shorter than my long bed, and about 10' shorter than a short bed crew Ford.
But I'm telling you it's a huge difference; on my truck you have to be hyper vigilant to not get extremely close to everything, and I do have to make a 3 point turn, on his Ram, it's easy peasy with a much lower stress level.

My wife will not even drive my truck down it.
Her Tundra negotiates it well too.

I don't tend to keep a truck more than a few years but I drive alot, 35-40k miles a year.

It may seem like a simple thing but going in and out of here a few times a day sucks right now.
 

jadmt

Well-known member
No. The OP is going to trade in a perfectly good truck because of a driveway switchback. It's not a three point turn in the middle of the interstate. And I have no idea why snow, or the lack of it would make any difference.

That is completely ridiculous. I've heard weirder reasons to take another $10k depreciation hit, but this one is a winner.
yet you have not seen his driveway so how can you make any claim.........
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
Do whatever you want to. I wouldn't. Learning to navigate such things in the big trucks is enjoyable to me, not stressful.

Give me my crew cab cab dually. I'm game.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
The specs I found from a search showed his turning circle about 15' shorter than my long bed, and about 10' shorter than a short bed crew Ford.
But I'm telling you it's a huge difference; on my truck you have to be hyper vigilant to not get extremely close to everything, and I do have to make a 3 point turn, on his Ram, it's easy peasy with a much lower stress level.

My wife will not even drive my truck down it.
Her Tundra negotiates it well too.

I don't tend to keep a truck more than a few years but I drive alot, 35-40k miles a year.

It may seem like a simple thing but going in and out of here a few times a day sucks right now.
Ram is 47.9' curb tocurb for a crew cab shortbox, Ford is 53'. Test drive both and see how they compare. The Ford bed is a little longer, the cab may be too.


 

phsycle

Adventurer
The specs I found from a search showed his turning circle about 15' shorter than my long bed, and about 10' shorter than a short bed crew Ford.
But I'm telling you it's a huge difference; on my truck you have to be hyper vigilant to not get extremely close to everything, and I do have to make a 3 point turn, on his Ram, it's easy peasy with a much lower stress level.

My wife will not even drive my truck down it.
Her Tundra negotiates it well too.

I don't tend to keep a truck more than a few years but I drive alot, 35-40k miles a year.

It may seem like a simple thing but going in and out of here a few times a day sucks right now.
Meh, specs on paper don’t necessarily translate to real world experience.

You didn’t mention whether your father’s Ram was a 2500/3500, or 1/2 ton (maybe I missed it), but...

Do you not need a long bed anymore?

My advice:
Don’t make an emotional decision now. You haven’t even moved to your new place. Just drive your truck. Chances are, you’ll end up getting used to it and not minding it. Use the $15k “savings” for awesome trips. Or towards building up a man cave.
 

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Regcabguy

Expedition Leader
The new mono control arm Fords lost 5.5 ft on the turning radius. Can you imagine the leaf sprung ones? My BIL's is nuts.
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
Bama, where abouts in North Idaho?

Im in down in Moscow, and am currently building a new place in the Spirit Lake/Priest River area
 

phsycle

Adventurer
Learning to navigate such things in the big trucks is enjoyable to me, not stressful.

Give me my crew cab cab dually. I'm game.
I’ll have to echo that. I’ve been to some Asian countries, riding big buses through the city. Not the smaller clapped out ghetto buses you see in 3rd world countries, but the “Le Bus” type rigs.
The drivers would maneuver these things through the roads at gridlock rush hour traffic. Tight parking lots. Tiny back roads. These cats didn’t even have rear cameras. Just backing up, maneuvering inches from walls, cars, people. It was like an art form what they were doing.
Now, I ain’t about to go cramming a full-size rig down tight trails busting up body panels and getting free pin striping. But stuff like tight driveways, garage, etc. would be a fun challenge. Not an annoyance.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
I don't get any enjoyment out of it.

When I need to do tight manuvering around my barnlot or whatever... my Ranger blows my F-150 away. I don't even dink with the big truck (which is tiny compared to those being discussed here)
 

ExpoMike

Well-known member
So I had done some research on the Hemi camshaft issue and one guy finally figured out the how/why they do them and it made sense in the explanation. Mopar did not build the block to allow oil to drip down onto the cam from the upper part of the block. GM and likely Ford (I am not a Ford person) have an oiling system that helps keep the camshaft lubed, especially at idle. It seem the Hemi does not and long idle times tends to starve the camshaft of oil, leading to failures.

Interesting watch
 
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