I am thinking of of running air lift bags

#2
Yep. I put airbags inside my AEV 2.5 springs a few months ago. Couldn't be happier. Much better side to side rocking control.

Had to drop the axle to install, but only about an hour and a half total.

I'm thinking about building a custom valve body to hold the schraders for inflation, but they certainly work jut zp tied in place.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
#3
I've had Air Lift kits installed in both of my LJ-based Jeeps for years and I highly recommend them. I first installed them in my LJ-based pickup to better handle loads in the bed and they worked so well on- and off-road that I installed a set in my other LJ. I'm in the process of installing a kit in my JKU now because the weight of the roof top tent, fridge, slide-out kitchen, etc. makes the stock suspension wallow a bit (UPS is delivering the kit today and I'll be posting about the install in my thread over the next few days).

The Air Lift kit really helps with loads...



They perform well on the trail too.



One thing I've done in both LJs and am also doing in the JKU is installing a pressure gauge to monitor the pressure in the bags.

 
#4
I’ve been super happy with my airbag setup.
No remote monitoring like jscherb (which would be an excellent add-on) but it works nicely with the air lines plumbed to the outside, sort of hidden in the bumper cutout from the recon/10a bumper, for easy adjustment.
Slipped right inside the recon springs too, I didn’t even have to unbolt or remove anything to install.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
#6
Jeff - did/do you have both rear air bags plumbed together? The single pressure gauge implies so. I plan on running air bags in my LJ, but plumbed independently.

Do you find the gauge reveals chronic air loss, or is it just a "nice to have" data point? I am not criticizing at all, just wondering if there is a benefit to having dual gauges for my own application. At the moment I am not planning on it. I will have an air gauge for the OBA storage tank, but that's it.

Cheers,

Jim


One thing I've done in both LJs and am also doing in the JKU is installing a pressure gauge to monitor the pressure in the bags.

 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
#7
Jeff - did/do you have both rear air bags plumbed together? The single pressure gauge implies so. I plan on running air bags in my LJ, but plumbed independently.

Do you find the gauge reveals chronic air loss, or is it just a "nice to have" data point? I am not criticizing at all, just wondering if there is a benefit to having dual gauges for my own application. At the moment I am not planning on it. I will have an air gauge for the OBA storage tank, but that's it.

Cheers,

Jim
Jim,

Yes, mine are plumbed together.

I probably can claim 17 years experience with Air Lift bags (9 years in my pickup and 8 in my LJ) and almost 250,000 miles using them (the LJ has 180,000 miles on it and the pickup has 110,000 and I installed the kits fairly early in that mileage). In all that time, carrying lots of loads in the pickup and doing lots of trail and overlanding miles in the LJ I've never wished I had plumbed them separately. In theory it sounds nice to be able to adjust each side separately, but in practice I've never felt the need.

About the gauge, it has two main uses:

1. Detecting leaks. One of the bags in my LJ developed a slow leak and I didn't know it - this was before I installed the gauge. When the bag has no air in it, it's likely to spin inside the spring as the suspension flexes, and this twists and eventually destroys the air line, which was what happened to me. Air Lift replaced my failed bag for free, and when I was installing the replacement bag I added the gauges to both Jeeps. Now I can monitor for slow leaks.

2. Changes in elevation can result in excessive pressure - if I start out here in NY at 800' elev with 30 PSI in the bags and drive to Colorado and take on some trails with 12,000+ elevation, the pressure in the bags at elevation will be higher than the maximum recommended pressure. I usually let some air out at elevation to keep the pressure within spec.

BTW I carry a small bicycle pump (the type that would mount on the frame of a bike) and use that to air back up - the bags aren't too big so it doesn't take too long to get back to pressure when I'm at lower elevations.

jeff
 
#8
Is anyone ever used air bag overload bags I. Their springs?
View attachment 452868
First, love your recon!

Second, why not just get heavier springs? (For my own education...)
I've had some heavier loads in the Jeep for a short time, as well as misloaded the trailer with too much weight up front, weighing down the Jeep too much. But USUALLY my springs are okay (stock for now). But if you have mostly a constant heavier weight, why not just get heavier springs? Or does your cargo weight vary that much?

I like the options air bags give, but seems like a weak point that if fails, could leave you stranded, or at least ditching cargo in the middle of the trail!

Another option, maybe get some longer good Timbren bump stops???
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
#9
...Second, why not just get heavier springs? (For my own education...)
He can post his answer, but here's mine: adjustability. For the 95% of the miles I do with the Jeep not loaded, the bags have 5 lbs. of air pressure in them for a stock ride. Installing heavier springs would stiffen the ride 100% of the time. With the air bags I can adjust the stiffness appropriate to the load I am carrying at the time.
 
#10
He can post his answer, but here's mine: adjustability. For the 95% of the miles I do with the Jeep not loaded, the bags have 5 lbs. of air pressure in them for a stock ride. Installing heavier springs would stiffen the ride 100% of the time. With the air bags I can adjust the stiffness appropriate to the load I am carrying at the time.
Yeah that definitely makes more sense. That's kind of where I'd be. Mostly very little weight, sometimes quite a bit. I like that option.

Are they usable with mostly any spring? I've seen where some bump stops mount inside the springs. Maybe that's only the fronts though, not sure.

I'll probably go with Teraflex again on this Jeep, and I'd like a nicer ride for the family but with the ability to stiffen up the rear for other days!
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
#11
Yeah that definitely makes more sense. That's kind of where I'd be. Mostly very little weight, sometimes quite a bit. I like that option.

Are they usable with mostly any spring? I've seen where some bump stops mount inside the springs. Maybe that's only the fronts though, not sure.

I'll probably go with Teraflex again on this Jeep, and I'd like a nicer ride for the family but with the ability to stiffen up the rear for other days!
The Air Lift web site (https://www.airliftcompany.com/products/air-springs/air-lift-1000/) claims they support "a massive array of vehicles" so even if you have custom springs I would imagine they could find something to fit.
 
#12
ah, i guess you really need to know that space inside your spring well huh... taller spring might mean different bag? would it be best to plumb bags together then to a compressor? or do you like the hand pump?
 
#14
okay, NOW im thinking those timbren SESs in the rear, but adding the teraflex air bumps later on. think that would be a good all around set up, for towing, yet still allow for a lot of flex? or would it not allow enough uptravel?
 
#15
Good setup, I am too considering the airlift system for my ride. Is there anyone who guide me towards the best brand to buy from? One of my friends is using the rancho airlift system, Is it efficient for offroading.