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Hyundai Santa Cruz

phsycle

Adventurer
I’m loving this compact “truck.”

No, no 4lo, frame/body, front or rear lockers, etc. But I love the practicality of the truck bed (despite the 4’ size), overall size (almost a foot shorter than a Tacoma), decent size interior (looks to be on par with the Tacoma except better seating position), and some nice factory options. Also, the rear window rolls down (a la Tundra), which is very cool.

I’ve always liked the El Camino/Subaru Baja concept. Easy and comfortable daily driver with a truck bed practicality. Hopefully these will sell better than the Baja and get some aftermarket support.

 

utherjorge

Observer
It's going to be interesting to see what the roof can carry (weight wise) and what the rear diff and 4x4 system is like. For instance, there are upgrades for Honda Elements that strengthen the rear diff off of other Hondas. Will that be possible, or needed? How is the 4x4/AWD set up, and will it overheat under use like Subie CVTs or Bronco Sport rear diffs?

And of course, everything I just typed above will need to be sorted out for the Maverick, too. Interesting products for sure!
 

4000lbsOfGoat

Active member
That's an interesting little "trucklet" (as they called it).

Hyundai\Kia really confuses me though. Why does a South Korean company insist on naming all of their US-market cars after US cities? Are we Americans really so shallow? (Yeah, we probably are.)
 

Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
I'm still trying to figure out who the intended customer for this vehicle is. Seems to me it doesn't do anything better than an actual truck or SUV. I suppose the uniqueness might appeal to a few customers at first but I can't imagine them selling in large numbers. I think Honda already has this market captured with the Ridgeline, so I'm not sure who would be in the market for a smaller version of the ridgeline.

I know the article seems to say that the Baja was a failure because of bad timing but maybe the Baja was a failure because it just wasn't a good idea?

IOW A brilliant answer - to a question that nobody asked?
 

Todd n Natalie

Observer
I'm still trying to figure out who the intended customer for this vehicle is. Seems to me it doesn't do anything better than an actual truck or SUV. I suppose the uniqueness might appeal to a few customers at first but I can't imagine them selling in large numbers. I think Honda already has this market captured with the Ridgeline, so I'm not sure who would be in the market for a smaller version of the ridgeline.

I know the article seems to say that the Baja was a failure because of bad timing but maybe the Baja was a failure because it just wasn't a good idea?

IOW A brilliant answer - to a question that nobody asked?
I think it will compete not only with the Ridgeline but the upcoming Ford Maverick.

Why let Honda have that entire market? I think it's good to see some competition.

Funny, they said Outback but I almost pictured them as crew cab versions of these vehicles:
1982-Dodge-Rampage-2.2-tonneau.jpg
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225893_Front_3-4_Web.jpg
an1116-260913_12@2x.jpg

I think small unibody pick ups are popular in other parts of the world as well. So maybe not completely unfounded?
 

AbleGuy

A Son of the Purple Sage
I’m loving this compact “truck.
Also, the rear window rolls down (a la Tundra), which is very cool.
That was an interesting read, thx for posting.

Maybe you missed this in the article tho?
“Unlike the Baja and the Chevrolet Avalanche, there's no mid-gate to increase the bed length, nor does the rear window roll down.”
Too bad, 😒 because that would have been a really nice feature.
 
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MarcusBrody

Active member
I like it, though I wish the bed were at least 6 inches longer for throwing mountain bikes over the tailgate.

I currently have a Transit Connect, which is an awesome adventure vehicle in that it's relatively small, but can hold a LOT of stuff, but it's pretty lousy if things are rough due to lack of clearance and suspension. That barely bothered me when I was living in the East and largely traveling to do other outdoor activities (skiing/biking/hiking), but now that I'm in the West and have a little kid so we stick closer to the camper I want something with a bit more capability for long rutted washboard roads. Except no SUVs near the size of the Transit Connect have anywhere close to the space, especially space that's a nice useful cube. I'd really just like a Transit Connect "Outback" or similar, but until they make one of those, it seems like the Santa Cruz or upcoming Ford Maverick with a cap might be the closes thing to it.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
I like it, though I wish the bed were at least 6 inches longer for throwing mountain bikes over the tailgate.

I currently have a Transit Connect, which is an awesome adventure vehicle in that it's relatively small, but can hold a LOT of stuff, but it's pretty lousy if things are rough due to lack of clearance and suspension. That barely bothered me when I was living in the East and largely traveling to do other outdoor activities (skiing/biking/hiking), but now that I'm in the West and have a little kid so we stick closer to the camper I want something with a bit more capability for long rutted washboard roads. Except no SUVs near the size of the Transit Connect have anywhere close to the space, especially space that's a nice useful cube. I'd really just like a Transit Connect "Outback" or similar, but until they make one of those, it seems like the Santa Cruz or upcoming Ford Maverick with a cap might be the closes thing to it.
I really like Transit Connects. Wish they had AWD. One other option for you would be a Toyota Sienna AWD with the Journey’s lift kit.
 

axlesandantennas

Approved Vendor

MarcusBrody

Active member
I really like Transit Connects. Wish they had AWD. One other option for you would be a Toyota Sienna AWD with the Journey’s lift kit.
I find the lack of ground clearance more of an issue than the lack of AWD, but in my dream version, it definitely would have both.

I have been looking at Sienna's and the lift kit. I really like the new hybrid (save for the stupid non-removeable middle seats, edit: and it looks like it loses 12 cu ft of storage behind the second row!). I know that Journey just came out with a 3 in lift for the newest gen. I've been watching the Sienna forums to see the experiences people have with it once a few are out in the wild. Even though the Sienna is notably larger than the Transit Connect, I now live in a place where things aren't as tight, so it's probably my top option for a direct TC replacement. An LE (which I'd probably want anyway for the smaller wheels and dog friendlier bench middle seat) AWD with roof rails and the tow hitch comes in at just under 38k MSRP. Add another $600 for the lift, ? for installation, and maybe some new tires, and you're looking at just around 40k for what would be a pretty awesome and efficient outdoor road trip vehicle.

I'm curious about how they achieved the .6in lift for the Woodland Edition. 7 in of ground clearance still isn't ideal given how long the van is, but it would be nice for it to be clearly able to fit slightly longer shocks.
 
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Florida Native

Active member
I find the lack of ground clearance more of an issue than the lack of AWD, but in my dream version, it definitely would have both.

I have been looking at Sienna's and the lift kit. I really like the new hybrid (save for the stupid non-removeable middle seats, edit: and it looks like it loses 12 cu ft of storage behind the second row!). I know that Journey just came out with a 3 in lift for the newest gen. I've been watching the Sienna forums to see the experiences people have with it once a few are out in the wild. Even though the Sienna is notably larger than the Transit Connect, I now live in a place where things aren't as tight, so it's probably my top option for a direct TC replacement. An LE (which I'd probably want anyway for the smaller wheels and dog friendlier bench middle seat) AWD with roof rails and the tow hitch comes in at just under 38k MSRP. Add another $600 for the lift, ? for installation, and maybe some new tires, and you're looking at just around 40k for what would be a pretty awesome and efficient outdoor road trip vehicle.

I'm curious about how they achieved the .6in lift for the Woodland Edition. 7 in of ground clearance still isn't ideal given how long the van is, but it would be nice for it to be clearly able to fit slightly longer shocks.
Supposedly Journeys is working on a 2” lift for the 2021+ Sienna which I think would be better than their 3” which is out now. There have been more than a few folks with CV joint problems with the 3” lift on the older/non-hybrid Siennas.

-Mike
 

MarcusBrody

Active member
Supposedly Journeys is working on a 2” lift for the 2021+ Sienna which I think would be better than their 3” which is out now. There have been more than a few folks with CV joint problems with the 3” lift on the older/non-hybrid Siennas.

-Mike
I'm glad to hear that. 3 inches struck me as a bit much for the vehicle given that it's never going to be an off road beast. 2 inches seems pretty perfect for keeping good efficiency and ease of loading, which is why I like minivans as adventure vehicles in the first place. That's especially true as the Woodlands edition of the Sienna suggests that you can get another half inch long shocking it in any case.
 
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