How often do you disconnect?

Outdoorsben

Observer
Whenever I start heading out I always go back and forth on disconnecting or not disconnecting. Curious how often you guys disconnect before heading out on some overland travel. Obviously if you are rock crawling or tackling some gnarly terrain you do but what about all the other times. I often air down far more than I am disconnected.
 

MOguy

Explorer
Another for the Currie AntiRock. You want a little preload on the front end.

This is an interesting topic. They only take into account traction but stability is also something consider. Even if you are hanging a tire that doesn't have enough weight to grab the surface (for traction) if it is on the ground or close to the ground the less you fall into something.

If you have lockers your useful flex can be increased, the article does address this but it is something that needs to be reemphasized.

Useful flex can go past where you get traction to before your spring falls out, depending on the situation.

How does it compare on road to a traditional sway bar? I have read reviews were people are not as happy with the on road performance compared to a traditional sway bar.
 
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rnArmy

Adventurer
This is an interesting topic. They only take into account traction but stability is also something consider. Even if you are hanging a tire that doesn't have enough weight to grab the surface (for traction) if it is on the ground or close to the ground the less you fall into something.

If you have lockers your useful flex can be increased, the article does address this but it is something that needs to be reemphasized.

Useful flex can go past where you get traction to before your spring falls out, depending on the situation.

I have never heard anybody complain about the anti rock off road, how does it compare on road to a traditional sway bar?
It is still a sway bar; just a lighter than stock (and adjustable) sway bar. On-road it seems fine; I never really think about it when driving on pavement. It doesn't dive or anything when turning sharp.
Jeeping off road.jpg
 

MOguy

Explorer
It is still a sway bar; just a lighter than stock (and adjustable) sway bar. On-road it seems fine; I never really think about it when driving on pavement. It doesn't dive or anything when turning sharp.
This is disconnected off road for me, I even use a undersized bushing in the rear to allow a little more stretch. I do have arbs front and rear. Jeep remains level off road but you do notice the body roll disconnected when you get going up to higher speeds.
 

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billiebob

Well-known member
How does it compare on road to a traditional sway bar?
I have the stock bar, I had a broken link for a few months and never noticed it but after repairing it I noriced the difference. Without the front sway bar, there was a twitch getting set up to take a highway cutve at double the posted limit. Once fixed, the twitch disappeared, no need to set up, my Wrangler was just point and shoot.

I plan on installing the Currie AntiRock this year mostly so I can drop my winch 2". I know I'll have zero issues with reduced stiffness but yes, the TJ Wrangler is incredibly well balanced when left stock. I'm thinking a 4"lift has a far more negative affect on roll control than a smaller sway bar.
 
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