How much extra fuel do you take?

billiebob

Well-known member
I'm planning a trip to see if there is a FSR that connects Gold Bridge BC to Riske Creek BC
yes, there is a route. I don't think it is all FSR, I think a short bit of it is just resource road. My last trip thru there was 20 plus years ago in a YJ, I never carried extra fuel. I don't think the distances between gas stops are ever 100 miles. Gold Bridge, Lillooet, I think Gang Ranch sold gas too.... altho COVID might have closed Gang Ranch. I was planning on doing it after the Overland Rally in Whistler last summer.... but that got cancelled. The Caribou is Gods country, I love the high elevations. The canyon and bridge over the Chilcotin River is spectacular at sunset. Definitely spend some time around there.

Or since this is 4 months later, how was the trip....

Apologies for my attitude, old truck driver, when I see 16 hours of driving I think 16 hours of hammer down, 1000 miles.
 
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roving1

Well-known member
I take up to 40L for a big trip but after being stuck in a city for days in Mexico because of a fuel shortage once I now carry at least 20L all the time everywhere. That situation just absolutely sucked. I have also been caught out by hurricanes and other storm related power outages where extra gas would have been nice.
PANO_20190105_123228.jpg

Waited in line for 4 hours and they ran out of gas anyways vid.

I am amazed how handy that extra fuel is even when freeway driving though. Pushing range and the gas station is closed? No biggee. Get to your fuel stop exit and the food sucks? Skip it and push on to the next town. Everybody's card readers are down? Same just move on. I have a dinky tank so on a big driving day it's nothing to fuel up 4 times and it's nice to be able to push things for efficiency or convenience. I have only dumped the fuel in a few times freeway driving but not worrying about pushing range I have done dozens and dozens of times.

I get seriously annoyed at the people that claim it's so hard to get out there enough to need extra gas. Most of these people often live in the urban centers where they start their journey and are not necessarily moving from one remote area to another semi randomly exploring. They are also much more likely to be going to very specific places and routes where they are confident of fuel. But what urks me the most about the mind set about how easy it is to get fuel is that if pretty much ANYTHING changes or goes wrong with your plans fuel instantly becomes what you have to base all your actions around. I can't count how many times something was washed out or blocked or the weather at altitude sucked or was snowed in or I just plain did not like an area and changed where I wanted to go. So many of those times would have just been "Well I now need to go directly here to buy fuel and backtrack XX miles and then retrace XX miles" without extra gas. To me that's the biggest reason by far is the piece of mind and flexibility it gives me.

Plus there is just such a range difference in stock vehicles due to tank size and MPG. I think people forget to convert to an apples to apples comparison when they have a pickup that might have 500+ miles stock vs something that can barely make 250-300 miles a tank.
 

alanymarce

Active member
If you can add extra tankage it is worth it. We carry 24 hrs of fuel, 450 liters, 2000 km range. The added bonus of such large range is we can select the cheapest fuel. Not an option for smaller vehicles.
So, you take an extra 400 lb of fuel, which will increase your fuel consumption significantly, to save a few cents on a tank fill?
 

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Alloy

Well-known member
yes, there is a route. I don't think it is all FSR, I think a short bit of it is just resource road. My last trip thru there was 20 plus years ago in a YJ, I never carried extra fuel. I don't think the distances between gas stops are ever 100 miles. Gold Bridge, Lillooet, I think Gang Ranch sold gas too.... altho COVID might have closed Gang Ranch. I was planning on doing it after the Overland Rally in Whistler last summer.... but that got cancelled. The Caribou is Gods country, I love the high elevations. The canyon and bridge over the Chilcotin River is spectacular at sunset. Definitely spend some time around there.

Or since this is 4 months later, how was the trip....

Apologies for my attitude, old truck driver, when I see 16 hours of driving I think 16 hours of hammer down, 1000 miles.
Haven't done it. Working on a home reno and the 2020 Outback was getting too many pin stripes. Disappointing as the weight/ suspension in the Outback let it travel 50% faster at 1/4 of the fuel cost vs. the F350.

We were 3 hours into the back roads South of Princeton towards Flat Top Mountain last weekend with the F350. Times are changing. Ended up stopping a few times as roads that had been passable with a full size truck are only passable with an ATV now.

Lots of logging in the area. Surprising the number of blocks that were Douglas Fir are replanted with Lodgepole Pine.
 

kdeleon

Observer
5gal can. Empty on daytime driving but if u have to get off the main highway especially at night, i fill it up.

Ive used the can a few times since having one makes me a bit overconfident skipping a gas station which then turns too, oops next gas station is still 50 miles lol. Otherwise its there for peace of mnd, not for the needed extended range say a trip to canyonlands maze.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

Joe917

Explorer
So, you take an extra 400 lb of fuel, which will increase your fuel consumption significantly, to save a few cents on a tank fill?
It is a 9 tonne truck, It is hard to tell if it is full or empty by "feel", fuel consumption full or empty does not change much.. When you put in 100 gallons every cent in price is a dollar saved.
 

rnArmy

Adventurer
Both my Jeeps have a 5-gallon Jerry can. If taking the truck, I can put a 5-gallon jug inside a milk crate. My trailer has two 2.5-gallon Jerry cans, and two 1.5 gallon Kolpin cells mounted to the front of the trailer tub (one of which usually just has one gallon of pre-mix gas for the chainsaw, but in a pinch I could put it in the gas tank).

When driving around town, they're empty. If going on a long trip or an overlanding adventure, they're full (or I'll fill them at the last gas stop before going off pavement). It give me peace-of-mind knowing I've got some fuel in reserve for just-in-case.

Have I ever had to really use it? No. But I have had to help out a stranded person or two.

wiring.2 (2).jpgOverland Adventure.2.jpg20200905_163035.jpg
 
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geojag

Member
I typically get around 300 miles +/- from a tank of fuel. If I am going to be our for a while, I have carried 5 gal in a VP Racing can. I have never used it for my vehicle, but have helped some other folks out. I try to fill up when I get a chance, around my AO there are plenty of fueling opportunities. Several times I have come across ATVs that have run out of fuel, usually kids that don't have a clue.
 

bryce0lynch

New member
Both my Jeeps have a 5-gallon Jerry can. If taking the truck, I can put a 5-gallon jug inside a milk crate. My trailer has two 2.5-gallon Jerry cans, and two 1.5 gallon Kolpin cells mounted to the front of the trailer tub (one of which usually just has one gallon of pre-mix gas for the chainsaw, but in a pinch I could put it in the gas tank)
I see you've got a spare jug in the back of the truck, with the truck cap on. I've been thinking about this also for my truck cap camper setup. Do you get any smell at all and/or how do you handle that?
 

rnArmy

Adventurer
I see you've got a spare jug in the back of the truck, with the truck cap on. I've been thinking about this also for my truck cap camper setup. Do you get any smell at all and/or how do you handle that?
No smell, no issues. And I did a lot of bouncing on that trip.
 

JackW

Explorer
I added a 10 gallon auxiliary fuel tank to my Defender 90 diesel so I now have a range of around 400 miles plus a 5 gallon Jerry can on the roof to get another 80-100 miles. Sometimes diesel pumps are farther apart in the back country so I like to be prepared.
 
Something for your consideration: certain lengthwise tanks when low on fuel,at extreme angles, may experience fuel starvation.
Adding 5-10 gallons of additional fuel will help prevent that from happening.

Also--I have been told/read/heard--that some internal tank fuel pumps require fuel around them for cooling, or at least don't do as well when there isn't.

I have never run out of fuel in any of my trucks, but some gas stations along my route have.

As always, it is your choice. YMMV.
 
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