How Do You Mount Your Fire Extinguisher?

rayra

Expedition Leader
In my single-cab pickup I just attached the included mount in the back rear corner of the cab, it was an easy reach back with my left hand.

now in my storage drawers / platform in my Sub, a similar-sized extinguisher just happens to fit inside the front end of a drawer.

 

FlipperFla

Active member
One important note with extinguishers is you shoud take them out of their bracket and shake them to prevent the powder from caking from vibration so they work properly. I do mine once a year.
 

WSS

Observer
Our fire marshall does require our wall mounted ext. to be turned upside down once a month, never mentions anything about truck mounted extHe does check the tags though.
 

JIMBO

Expedition Leader
Behind each door on the upper cage--three loops and the bottom support--facing forward-

pretty solid mount-

W.E.

JIMBO
 

mm58

Observer
One important note with extinguishers is you shoud take them out of their bracket and shake them to prevent the powder from caking from vibration so they work properly. I do mine once a year.
Even better to turn up-side-down, then give them a few whacks on the side and bottom with a soft dead blow hammer.
 
Last edited:

Recommended books for Overlanding

FlipperFla

Active member
Our fire marshall does require our wall mounted ext. to be turned upside down once a month, never mentions anything about truck mounted extHe does check the tags though.
The way I caught on to this I was helping the Coast Guard Aux do boat inspections. The constant pounding and vibration will pack the powder to where the extingusher will not function properly.
 

WSS

Observer
The way I caught on to this I was helping the Coast Guard Aux do boat inspections. The constant pounding and vibration will pack the powder to where the extingusher will not function properly.
Done, I went out and and turned a bunch over a few times after reading your first post, all the trucks, Jeep, wifes SUV, etc.. any advice where a life and property can be saved is GOOD!

My Jeep onboard system is liquid AFFF, so it does not become "charged" until Co2 cartridge is punctured. The liquid inside the canister is a water and soapy like mix under no pressure. It is sealed with a thin "rupture" disc that gives way when pressure rises.
 

WSS

Observer

jakegrovephoto

Active member
It cost $350 for kit. I added an extra nozzle or 2. Plus in the engine compartment, I put braided line for ease os install and looks. The an fittings were a hefty price but worth the extra assurance of working when needed.

https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/productdetails.asp?RecID=3431
Nice. $350 isn’t too bad for the added piece of mind and protection of investment building out a vehicle. I’ve seen some DIY approaches from a few Porsche track guys that look pretty well set, but still question the reliability when compared to little more expensive pieces. Thanks for the link
 
  • Like
Reactions: WSS

FlipperFla

Active member
Done, I went out and and turned a bunch over a few times after reading your first post, all the trucks, Jeep, wifes SUV, etc.. any advice where a life and property can be saved is GOOD!

My Jeep onboard system is liquid AFFF, so it does not become "charged" until Co2 cartridge is punctured. The liquid inside the canister is a water and soapy like mix under no pressure. It is sealed with a thin "rupture" disc that gives way when pressure rises.
Thats a really a nice system you have in your in your rig. I used to have a large boat with a halon system in the engine room with twin 350 small blocks. Boy did that suck up the gas, about a 1/2 mile per gal. It was like driving down the Intercoastal throwing out 5 dollar bills!
 
Top