How can I restore this massive cargo box to it's former glory?

tbared

Life participant
Really? I've tried 303 Protectant on black polypropylene trim and found it unremarkable. About the same effect as any one of the many products that do the same thing, and no longer lasting than any of them.

I had used it sometime ago on some tracotr parts on my Antonio. They were fiberglass trim pieces. It worked then at least.
 

NevetsG

Active member
Ok Packasport just got back to me and said that having it repainted at an autobody shop would be the best move, but also that a lot of people are apparently using Lemon Pledge furniture polish to restore these things. Go figure.
Cheap possible solution.
Then watch any videos to get an understanding of how to polish it using PlastX.

Yes this product is marketed for cleaning plastic headlights, but I've using it for many years to clean my motorcycle windscreen, and buff out scratches in plastic and fiberglass. Does it work all of the time, no, but it can make really crappy oxidation and scratches look just a bit better when the damage is extreme.
 

86scotty

Explorer
I would Raptor/Rhino/Monsta-line it. It will then be immune to tree branch scrapes (within reason) and be easier to grab or hold on to if needed. I understand it's a pretty rugged look which you might not prefer. Me though? I would Raptor Line it with their $100 kit from Amazon. You'll have half the kit left over to do something else fun with. I'd Raptor Line my kids if she would let me. I love the stuff.
 

Buddha.

Finally in expo white.
Gelcoat works well when you spay it into a smooth mold. Once you sand it or rub it with abrasives the sealed surface comes off and your left with a porous surface. Paint it and be a happy camper. Paint will be lighter also.
I used to make boats like this. Even in the mold you could ruin it pretty quick if you were having an off day. That was a hard job.
 

DaveInDenver

Luddite
Gelcoat works well when you spay it into a smooth mold. Once you sand it or rub it with abrasives the sealed surface comes off and your left with a porous surface. Paint it and be a happy camper. Paint will be lighter also.
That's the use for it IMO - first coat sprayed in after the release into the mold. I'd use for spot repairs perhaps for not for a total re-coat. To clean up the gelcoat on my WilderNest I use 3M 9006, which you should be able to find or at least order though paint suppliers. It's very slightly abrasive so don't go crazy. They also make just a straight up marine wax that works for periodic coating. They also have a cleaner and wax that's just barely abrasive, but I've never tried that.

3m-09006.jpg
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
That's the use for it IMO - first coat sprayed in after the release into the mold. I'd use for spot repairs perhaps for not for a total re-coat. To clean up the gelcoat on my WilderNest I use 3M 9006, which you should be able to find or at least order though paint suppliers. It's very slightly abrasive so don't go crazy. They also make just a straight up marine wax that works for periodic coating. They also have a cleaner and wax that's just barely abrasive, but I've never tried that.

View attachment 533214
Once any abrasive is used the smooth sealed gelcoat surface gets damaged and increases the staining risk and discoloring aspect. Wax simply seals the porous surface but is a very temporary fix till you wax again etc. Many people make the mistake of using the rubbing compound type waxes to clean or wax gelcoat and basically end up removing the sealed factory surface. Which is why eventually people the smart ones paint vs try to re gelcoat etc.
 

DaveInDenver

Luddite
Once any abrasive is used the smooth sealed gelcoat surface gets damaged and increases the staining risk and discoloring aspect. Wax simply seals the porous surface but is a very temporary fix till you wax again etc. Many people make the mistake of using the rubbing compound type waxes to clean or wax gelcoat and basically end up removing the sealed factory surface. Which is why eventually people the smart ones paint vs try to re gelcoat etc.
Once the gelcoat is oxidized I figure there's no reason to worry about using a light polishing compound like the 3M stuff I mentioned. I mean a gelcoat that's 25+ years old exposed to the UV here in Colorado isn't going to last forever even if a fella was absolutely OCD about waxing anyway. Factor in road salts, dirt, sandblasting from the wind. I've just had good experience restoring a dull, chalky, stained gelcoat to a very nice appearance with the stuff is why I mention it. I also offered to go easy because it is abrasive like a polishing compound and that 3M makes non-restoring/cleaning plain marine wax for maintenance. It's the same things you'd worry about with auto paint or any other coating. When it's new and in good shape regular wax or similar protectant. But it's at the end of its useful life you can extend it with some things but ultimately it reaches the point you have to redo it. Which I 100% agree use marine paint instead of a fresh gelcoat in that case.
 
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