Homemade Roofracks.

PCO6

Adventurer
I made a roof rack to carry 2 kayaks on top of my tear drop, or "tear pop" trailer. The goal was to not touch the roof which lifts to provide head room inside the trailer. I had no idea how strong it was and I figured it was better to avoid having any weight on the lid.

I started with a chain link fence gate and some fence top rail. I like the size (1.25" O.D.) and especially the perfect 90* bends. I cut up the gate, welded in sections to give the dimensions that I needed and made various brackets to attach it the sides of the trailer at the front. The side are stronger and it avoided drilling any holes in the roof where water might leak through.

The rear structure works similar to a pick up "T-bar". I reinforced the trailer frame at the rear and installed a 2" receiver tube. I insert the kayak rack T-bar when needed (we don't always take them) and lift the kayaks on. The front rack has a pull out pipe that I lift the bow of the kayaks up on to and then walk the kayaks over on to the T-bar. Everything is lashed down with ratchet ropes and the whole process takes about 15 minutes for 2 kayaks.

The rear T-bar does double duty as it supports our on demand water heater while we're camping. I added another 2" receiver tube on the side of the trailer. It also the propane and water outlets that I plumb in under the trailer.
 

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PCO6

Adventurer
Similar to the above, I built a roof rack for my Jeep XJ using another fence gate and 2 lengths of e-track. I cut them up, added some tube and welded everything together. It attaches to the OEM rack that has a capacity of 150 lbs which is fine for my needs. The e-track has plenty of latch points and accessories BUT as I thought it might, it “hummed” while driving. It was a kind of pleasant sound but I knew it would eventually drive me nuts.

The solution to the hum was to build a wind deflector. I made it out of 16g sheet metal and mounted it using 3 light bar tube mounts. I added a 4th one to the rear of the rack for an independently switched back up light and general purpose camp light.

I still have to build a separate rack for the front. It will look something like a light bar but will house a tube with an internal pull out pipe for loading kayaks like on the trailer rack above. I will only install that rack when we take the kayaks but not the trailer.
 

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imundzana

New member
Finished the rack for my Land Cruiser 80 recently. Way overkill on the angle bar sides and 50mm steel tubing on the ends, but it's mostly a work vehicle, and it'll occasionally have to carry lumber and construction materials to projects in remote locations. I designed it wide enough for sheets of plywood to lie flat, and left the front and back ends open for long wood/steel.
I eventually want to mount my hi-lift and a shovel on one side, and a 270* awning on the other.

I would have done something smoother to match the curves of the 80 if I had a tubing bender. IMG_20201214_121239205_HDR~2.jpgIMG_20210212_160554625~2.jpg
 

Raul

Adventurer
Priority was price as weight. Since I do not need to carry an apartment building on top, wood can do. Three contractor style bars and wood frame and decking. Cheap, easy to work. Party deck, cargo area, solar panels and awning support. IMG_0956.JPG

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pith helmet

Well-known member
Priority was price as weight. Since I do not need to carry an apartment building on top, wood can do. Three contractor style bars and wood frame and decking. Cheap, easy to work. Party deck, cargo area, solar panels and awning support.
Nicely done! I almost went with wood or bamboo as I did years ago, but opted for metal this time. 6DCD1948-5571-46D8-A7FF-94532B2ACD7A.jpeg
 
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