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1BADQX4

New member
20161005_174338.jpg20161005_174338.jpg20161005_174338.jpg

1999.5 qx4 2' spacer lift. center locking dif, rear lsd. auto trans. home made roof rack by me and home made bumper. bumper not by me someone else but I am working on a new and improved version this current one does not look all that nice. 265/75r16 goodyear duratracs. 40' and 18 ' light bars. rear air bags for load. ac rear coils. homemade skid plate. k&n filter. working on snorkel kit. its my daily driver so I got to keep her together.
 

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Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
Yes, all QX4's and any Pathfinders with the "all-mode" transfer case are AWD with a locking center diff and a low-range.
Center locking differential, similar to 4runners of the same generation.

My understanding is that this was also an option on the Pathfinder, though in my searching for R50 Pathfinders, I only found one with this type of T-case. The way to tell is whether it has the dial for the 4wd control or the lever. If it has the dial it's got the center locking diff, if it has the lever it's the conventional transfer case with no center diff.

What's funny to me is that Nissan offered a locking center diff on the R50 Pathy but on its successor, the R51, the only way to get it was with the AWD V8. If you got a V6 there was no center diff. Similar to what Toyota did when they went from the 4th gen 4runner to the 5th gen, they deleted the center diff from all models except the limited.
 

Nd4SpdSe

Adventurer, eh?
Well, it's probably exactly that. The reason for a center diff is for use on pavement in an AWD move. Having a center diff allows the front and rear diffs to spin a different speeds. This gives you your "full-time" AWD/4x4 system.

A traditional transfer case locks it at the "center", no matter if it's done with a lever or with a button (The button just saves dash/floor space. A Ford Ranger, you can convert it from one to the other). The AWD V8 would make sense it being actually AWD. And also think for the 4Runner, it's actually 2 different options, cause one is 4x4, while the other is AWD...for 2016 it's the Trail Edition that's 4x4, Limited is AWD (In Canada anyway).

I'm not 100% familiar with the Pathfinders and their options, but to me, they were all 4x4.
 

1BADQX4

New member
Yes center locking dif. saving for a lot to finish it up. I was contemplating on selling it but have decided to keep it. just need to get more power under the hood.thinking chevy vortec v6 swap. tons of torque. we shall see.
 

kootenay

Intergalacticsuperintendent
Interesting idea. I have always wanted an AWD/4WD/LS combo in a small vehicle.

Issues you might find, are that with the Hardbody trucks, the centre diff sits where the oil pan on an LS would need to be. Never though about looking into the QX4, might have to take some measurements. When looking into this with a Pathfinder, the LS should fit if you run the Corvette accessories. The transmission becomes a bit of a sticking point as well, not sure if anyone is making an adaptor plate for them. You could always get a custom one made. This leads to the other big issue, electronics. Getting the LS to run is one thing, getting the wheel sensors, tachometer, transmission, ABS, airbag and everything else to work with the LS motor is something else.
Another option that would be much more reliable is rebuilding the a VG, and using the pistons from the Infiniti V8. The pistons from a first generation Infiniti Q45 (1990-1994) VH45DE engine. These pistons give 3.4 liters of displacement and the flat top dome gives a compression ratio to 9.6:1, up from the stock 9:1 of the dished standard piston. The piston feature low friction coating on the skirts to boot and are cheap.The Q piston domes must be slightly modified with notches for valve clearance. We had a local machine shop duplicate the VG's valve notches on the Q pistons. The piston pin diameter for these pistons is 0.866” up from the VG33E's 0.822”. This happens to be the same size as the 300ZX's VG30DE rods so these rods can be used or the stock rods can be easily and cheaply rebushed for the larger pin. The VG30DE rods are stronger so it is advantageous to use them although the stock E rods are definitely not weak. If you want more info check out MotolQ http://www.motoiq.com/MagazineArticles/articleType/CategoryView/categoryId/80/Project-Nissan-Pathfinder.aspx
 
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Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
And also think for the 4Runner, it's actually 2 different options, cause one is 4x4, while the other is AWD...for 2016 it's the Trail Edition that's 4x4, Limited is AWD (In Canada anyway).

I'm not 100% familiar with the Pathfinders and their options, but to me, they were all 4x4.
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Well, it may be a quibble but I wouldn't call it "AWD." To me, at least, "AWD" is a system that is usually found in cars where power is transferred directly from the transmission or transaxle of the primary drive wheels (usually the front wheels on modern AWD cars although there are some exceptions to that) and that power is then sent to the secondary drive wheels by means of a clutch or viscous coupling that can vary the amount of power that goes to the normally-non-driving wheels (again, in MOST, but not all applications, this secondary set of drive wheels is the rear.) Such a system does not use a transfer case to split power between the front and rear axles.
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OTOH, the system that the 4runner Limited (and the QX4) has actually does use a traditional engine - transmission - transfer case layout, where the transfer case is used to split power between the front and rear axles. The difference being that it also incorporates a differential in the transfer case (center diff) that allows the vehicle to run in 4wd all the time even on paved roads. Yes, I know it's a quibble, but I don't call that "AWD", I would call that "full time 4wd" because it uses the same layout (engine-transmission-transfer case) as a conventional 4wd vehicle, but adds the center differential to allow for on-pavement use of 4wd.
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The non-limited 4runner uses a very similar arrangement, but without the center differential.
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And to throw even more confusion into the pot, the 4th gen (2003 - 2009) V6 4runner takes the full-time-4wd system I described above and adds a 2wd option as well. So on a 4th gen 4runner, you can run it in 2wd, in 4wd on dry pavement with the center diff unlocked (full time 4wd) or you can lock the center diff and then it becomes a conventional 4wd vehicle. I would describe this as a "multi-mode 4wd system."
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Again, please understand that these are MY terms that I use to describe the various 4wd systems - as the saying goes, your mileage (or your terminology) may vary. ;)
 

Nd4SpdSe

Adventurer, eh?
Nope, I wouldn't disagree with your terminology, I find it perfectly fitting. I know Ford (in the Exploreres and/or SportTrac) had a similar 2WD/FT-4x4/PT-4x4/4Low arrangement. In the end, it's just a center diff that changes/adds that extra function.

Actually AWD is hard to describe. Not many are. Most are just traction based (engage the rear axle when the front slips). There's plenty of comparison tests that show how poor they perform, if at all. Subaru, Acura and Audi are among the few that have a proper AWD system if I remember right.
 

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Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
View attachment 372673View attachment 372673View attachment 372673
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1999.5 qx4 2' spacer lift. center locking dif, rear lsd. auto trans. home made roof rack by me and home made bumper. bumper not by me someone else but I am working on a new and improved version this current one does not look all that nice.
.
I have to agree with you about the bumper. I had a similar bumper on my '99 4runner and it was not a good look either. Modern vehicles hide so much 'stuff' behind their bumpers and bumper covers that putting a "tube" - style bumper onto a modern vehicle typically results in a messy look.
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If you have the ability to make one, I'd go with a plate-style bumper just to hide all the messy hardware. Looks cleaner and is just as rugged.
 
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