Help with system design (this stuff hurts my brain, yes I have used search)

shade

Well-known member
My new question is would this be part of a dual battery set-up that is connected to the vehicles charging system as well as solar? If so what would the system look like? What connects to what? I'm not a fabricator so suggestion of bolt together, quality affordable system are appreciated.
At the bottom of my opening post in this thread are links to several Victron documents that may be helpful. Also, the Marine How To site is filled with information. Some of the information may be well past your plans, but a lot of it will apply.
 

Photobug

Active member
My new question is would this be part of a dual battery set-up that is connected to the vehicles charging system as well as solar? If so what would the system look like? What connects to what? I'm not a fabricator so suggestion of bolt together, quality affordable system are appreciated.
My needs are similar to yours except I don't have a fridge and also not a fabricator. I am capable of wiring things but nervous to starting drilling holes into my truck bed to bring power from the alternator to the truck bed. I had a 50w solar panel that came with a boat. I already had a group 27 Costco deep cycle battery built into a storage compartment in the back of my truck which I charge while at home and it gets me 3+ days of camping power for lights and device charging.

I added an MPPT charger to my setup and some simple wiring and I now can top off my battery every day as long as it is somewhat sunny. I found the solar very easy to add. Ultimately you likely want solar, alternator charging, AC charger, and generator. You need an AC charger likely to keep your battery maintained at home and can add solar or alternator first depending on whether you spend more time driving each day or more time staying 2 or more days in one location.
 

shade

Well-known member
And just so that no one is tempted, the one built into some Tacomas is optimistically rated at 400W max. It's not what one would call "high quality" either. Would be acceptable for a heating element without conditioning, though.
Good advice.
It's amazing to see some of the things people have run off of that inverter.
 

knoxswift

Active member

Atagrob

New member
So here is my thinking for a solution:

Coffee: 72 oz thermos of some kind with poor over system. Use propane stove to heat water. This will basically produce 1 pot of coffee that can be consumed over 1.0-1.5 hours while staying hot. No electricity required.

Dual battery, second battery in bed of truck, removable between uses.

Battery charger/management: RedArc BCDC1225D
Battery isolator: RedArc Smart Start SBI 12V 100A
Battery: Intersate 12v deep cycle form Costco for house battery
Solar: Renogy 100w folding w/o controller

This will cost about $825 plus wires and clamps. Probably overkill for my refrigerator but I like the idea of self jump start in case of dead/bad start battery.

If you have a better/cheaper idea I'm open to input.
 

eatSleepWoof

Explorer
OP, forget the dual battery setups described above. Completely unnecessary complication, especially given your limited understanding of the parts involved.

Buy a GoalZero Yeti 1000. Then buy some 100W of flexible solar panels with compatible plugs to charge the Yeti. That Yeti will power your fridge for 3-4 days before it needs a recharge. You can recharge through either your Tacoma's AC bed port, a 12v socket inside the cab, or the solar panel. It'll power your coffee marker and charge all your electronics.

Simplest option, longest run-time without recharge, completely portable, very reliable, and zero modifications to your vehicle.
 

kwill

Observer
OP, forget the dual battery setups described above. Completely unnecessary complication, especially given your limited understanding of the parts involved.

Buy a GoalZero Yeti 1000. Then buy some 100W of flexible solar panels with compatible plugs to charge the Yeti. That Yeti will power your fridge for 3-4 days before it needs a recharge. You can recharge through either your Tacoma's AC bed port, a 12v socket inside the cab, or the solar panel. It'll power your coffee marker and charge all your electronics.

Simplest option, longest run-time without recharge, completely portable, very reliable, and zero modifications to your vehicle.
I agree with the above EXCEPT for the GoalZero recommendation. IMO their products are overpriced. You can get great alternatives for about $1/wH.
 

Atagrob

New member
OP, forget the dual battery setups described above. Completely unnecessary complication, especially given your limited understanding of the parts involved.

Buy a GoalZero Yeti 1000. Then buy some 100W of flexible solar panels with compatible plugs to charge the Yeti. That Yeti will power your fridge for 3-4 days before it needs a recharge. You can recharge through either your Tacoma's AC bed port, a 12v socket inside the cab, or the solar panel. It'll power your coffee marker and charge all your electronics.

Simplest option, longest run-time without recharge, completely portable, very reliable, and zero modifications to your vehicle.
Seems expensive and they claim 500 cycles to 80%. Doesn't seem like they would last long. When it dies you throw it away. With my idea you only replace batteries and they get recycled.
 

john61ct

Adventurer
Yes those "high end" powerpacks really are not good value for money.

But a good shortcut if you have it to burn.

Watch out for the BMS crippling the actual C-rate available, limiting ability to parallel more capacity etc.
 

shade

Well-known member
I'm not sure why Goal Zero doesn't offer a replacement battery for that model. They do for others.
 

luthj

Engineer In Residence
I'm not sure why Goal Zero doesn't offer a replacement battery for that model. They do for others.
I would guess the battery is built-in such that it isn't user replaceable. Very easy to do if the designer doesn't have replaceability in mind.
 

shade

Well-known member
I would guess the battery is built-in such that it isn't user replaceable. Very easy to do if the designer doesn't have replaceability in mind.
That's my point. Maybe they had safety concerns about end users fumbling with a large lithium battery. 🤷‍♀️
 
Top