HAM and CB on FS roads

krick3tt

Adventurer
What channel should I be monitoring on CB when on FS roads to avoid untimely meeting with logging trucks?
 

BigDaveZJ

Adventurer
I usually just have mine set to scan as it's not always a consistent channel that other groups are using. That being said, I have literally never encountered an oncoming logging truck in 20 years and thousands of FS road miles in CO and UT.
 

Robert Bills

Explorer
I am one who has encountered an oncoming logging truck - A nerve wracking experience as I backed down a tight rough graded road around blind corners to a wide spot where I could get out of his way and not one I would like to repeat anytime soon.

As far as which CB channel to monitor for logging trucks, you will often find handmade signs with the channel number nailed to trees about truck cab height. If not, I set my CB to scan the channels until I pick up radio traffic from the loggers.
 

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BigDaveZJ

Adventurer
Ι think it's something more common in the in PNW and Alaska. The only time I've personally ever heard logging on the CB here in Colorado was in Jackson County up by Gould and that was probably 20 years ago now.

That's fair. I usually try to monitor for other groups on trails where passing oncoming traffic can be a challenge, i.e. Wheeler Lake. So there is merit to the idea, but there is really not a set channel anyone uses.

Last summer I was stuck behind a couple guys pulling wide loads on 285 from Denver down to Nathrop. I caught up with them at Red Hill Pass and was stuck behind them the whole way. They were on CB19 communicating the whole time so I was at least able to listen in to the pilot car communicating back to the wide loads to see if there was an opportunity to pass them, but there never was. All this on a weekend, while 285 was under construction between Fairplay and Antero Junction when there wasn't supposed to be any wide loads. The construction workers, and the oncoming traffic the wide loads effectively ran off the road, had some choice gestures for them.

Monitoring comms in any type of hairy driving situation definitely has value, but you'll never really know what channel/freq they're on until you find them.
 

Ace Brown

Adventurer, Overland Certified OC0019
In my recent travels the only time I ever saw the signs was in NW Montana last fall (2018). I was in the Idaho panhandle a few years ago and all the dirt roads were wide and nicely graded. I asked why and was told the logging companies did the work so they could run fast. I think I’ve seen them in other places buts it’s been a long time and I just don’t remember where. The USFS usually posts notices on info boards when there is logging nearby.

I have had some scary encounters with those trucks. They are paid by the load so they are usually hauling a$$.

Ace


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

BigJimCruising

Adventurer
I retired and moved to the Pacific Northwest with dreams of miles and miles of back country roads to roam. Yes there are signs up the roads with the CB channel number in use. If they're even using them which doesn't seem to really happen. But the real problem is that all the lumber companies are gating and closing their roads preventing us from getting into all those back country roads and camping spots. If a gate is open it means logging is going on so driving that road is going to be very dangerous. And when they're done for the day they lock the gates, with no way of knowing when, or if they'll be back and open the gate again.

You could possibly be trapped in a forest for an unknown period of time with little hope of finding another way out. Some of the old timers up here could probably do it but if you don't have a few decades of history up here then using these roads is just not an option. And good luck calling the local police or fire to come let you out, if they have a key to that gate who knows what fine or fee you'll need to pay. And don't forget that you'd be trespassing on private land and the lumber company could press charges adding even more fines for being on their property.

Sadly it's just not an option. It's such a shame with so much beautiful country just miles away that you can't even access most of it.
 

rgallant

Adventurer
In BC at least if they are actively logging the VHF channel is posted, I believe is required by law, no CB up here. Our problem is that it is a whole different license to broadcast on those channels. Most folks just have a hand held, that is modded and transmit their KM. If the trucks hear you they will call their KM marker and direction.

And they are moving you want to be out of their way. Gates other than Vancouver island, are still pretty rare still but it is getting worse as equipment gets damaged by morons and anti-logging types.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
I retired and moved to the Pacific Northwest with dreams of miles and miles of back country roads to roam. Yes there are signs up the roads with the CB channel number in use. If they're even using them which doesn't seem to really happen. But the real problem is that all the lumber companies are gating and closing their roads preventing us from getting into all those back country roads and camping spots. If a gate is open it means logging is going on so driving that road is going to be very dangerous. And when they're done for the day they lock the gates, with no way of knowing when, or if they'll be back and open the gate again.

You could possibly be trapped in a forest for an unknown period of time with little hope of finding another way out. Some of the old timers up here could probably do it but if you don't have a few decades of history up here then using these roads is just not an option. And good luck calling the local police or fire to come let you out, if they have a key to that gate who knows what fine or fee you'll need to pay. And don't forget that you'd be trespassing on private land and the lumber company could press charges adding even more fines for being on their property.

Sadly it's just not an option. It's such a shame with so much beautiful country just miles away that you can't even access most of it.
They're private gating National Forest (public lands) access or are the routes actually county roads (perhaps dual listed USFS) that access private inholdings?

There's a lawsuit here in western Colorado that sounds suspiciously similar. A private fishing lodge (The High Lonesome Ranch) in Garfield County put up a gate on a road that accesses both public and private property but the problem is the road is technically County Road 200. The lodge claims the gate is preventing trespassing and the road doesn't access anything, which is not the case. It's not an abandoned route and in good repair (I've been on it first person). It's been bumped into Federal court because the BLM was made a party to it, in fact. The reason they want it gated is to have semi-private access to a bunch of public land beyond since the alternative route is circuitous.
 
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craig333

Expedition Leader
I haven't seen the gate issue crop up here, yet. Crossing my fingers on that one. If you hear a truck call out milepost 7 and you're at milepost 6 its time to get out of the way. The roads I'm typically on are steep enough they can't stop even if they wanted to (and they don't want to) and thats a battle you can't win. Fortunately they usually take the weekends off.
 

BigJimCruising

Adventurer
They're private gating National Forest (public lands) access or are the routes actually county roads (perhaps dual listed USFS) that access private inholdings?

There's a lawsuit here in western Colorado that sounds suspiciously similar. A private fishing lodge (The High Lonesome Ranch) in Garfield County put up a gate on a road that accesses both public and private property but the problem is the road is technically County Road 200. The lodge claims the gate is preventing trespassing and the road doesn't access anything, which is not the case. It's not an abandoned route and in good repair (I've been on it first person). It's been bumped into Federal court because the BLM was made a party to it, in fact. The reason they want it gated is to have semi-private access to a bunch of public land beyond since the alternative route is circuitous.
I can't say for sure since I've only been up here a few years. There is access to public lands but not a lot of off roading is available. Mostly hiking and camping while hiking. Most of the gates I've found are access to private lumber companies property. It's a mix of misuse and liability for injuries and forest fires. At least that's what I've been told by the logging drivers. I know when you find a gated road you'll almost always find lots of trash from people just dumping it there. Probably a mix of all the above. Shame people can't treat the forests with more respect. And we end up paying the price for that. I'm not aware of any lawsuits over the gates, from what I've learned a lawsuit to force access to private property wouldn't get very far up here. Best of luck with your suit.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
from what I've learned a lawsuit to force access to private property wouldn't get very far up here. Best of luck with your suit.
In this case it's a private lodge that put up the gate on a county road that accesses BLM land. It's the county who filed the lawsuit.
 
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