Halley - '17 WK2 Trailhawk Overland Build

GhostRHR

New member
Love your build!! I just went from a built JKU to a 2019 GC Trailhawk. I have been looking at the specs for the roof rack and everything says a 150lbs MAX weight. how were you able to increase the weight limit to be able to support a roof top tent and 2 individuals? If you haven't done anything is there any concern with damage to roof eventually? thanks
 

bobholthaus

Observer
Parking lights are above the BCM in the pass kick panel wht/brown OR wht/orange. Black 24 pin plug.
Reverse lights same location wht/lt grn. White 24 pin plug.

The headlight stuff, I don't recommend messing with on your vehicle. If you'd like to try despite all the reasons not to,
Auto headlight, same location white/lt. green (need to relay isolate the switch) -2000 ohms (off). Blue 24 pin plug
Headlight, same location white/lt. green (need to relay isolate the switch) -660 ohms. Blue 24 pin plug
I have a few more questions which might benefit everyone:

1. What’s the easiest way/place to run wiring through the firewall?

2. Is the negative jump pin under the hood actually wires to the negative terminal of the battery?

3. If not, is there a place under the hood to tap that links directly to the negative terminal on the battery? This is a requirement of the www.switchpros.com switch setup I am using.

4. At the passenger footwell, which wire do I tap for the ignition? 2014 GC Ecodiesel.

If anyone has any threads they can send that show me how to remove the trim at the passenger footwell, I would appreciate it. Also, how to get the front bumper off (which I think is pretty easy, except for the plastic rivets in the wheelwells. Do I have to replace those at the dealership, and is there a special tool for that?)

Thanks in advance. I’m sorry to hijack this thread, but for anyone running lights up front that need switches in the cab, this is a great place to have this info. Thanks.


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TT-Tacoma

Observer
Love your build!! I just went from a built JKU to a 2019 GC Trailhawk. I have been looking at the specs for the roof rack and everything says a 150lbs MAX weight. how were you able to increase the weight limit to be able to support a roof top tent and 2 individuals? If you haven't done anything is there any concern with damage to roof eventually? thanks
That max weight is for when you are moving or a dynamic weight if you will. When static the weight limit is sufficient for a RTT or more weight.

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GhostRHR

New member
That max weight is for when you are moving or a dynamic weight if you will. When static the weight limit is sufficient for a RTT or more weight.

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Fair enough and the dynamic load makes sense, but is there a place that is documented the total static load that the roof can hold? I"m a big guy and figure the avg RTT is around 118lbs I am 240lbs and say another 150lbs if my wife comes with me. Thats just over 500lbs considering I have the panoramic sunroof I would assume teh integrity of the roof is slightly less then it would be without it. Sorry i'm an engineer so just trying to make sure the numbers work.
 

TT-Tacoma

Observer
Fair enough and the dynamic load makes sense, but is there a place that is documented the total static load that the roof can hold? I"m a big guy and figure the avg RTT is around 118lbs I am 240lbs and say another 150lbs if my wife comes with me. Thats just over 500lbs considering I have the panoramic sunroof I would assume teh integrity of the roof is slightly less then it would be without it. Sorry i'm an engineer so just trying to make sure the numbers work.
For the sake of the OP and not derailing his thread, take a look at this. https://www.chiefproducts.com.au/products/wk2-roof-rack I've heard Chief makes good stuff and if their rack can hold 600kg then I would imagine the roof can support it. But don't hold me to it. I'd reach out them for further info.

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2180miles

Endurance Adventuring
I have a few more questions which might benefit everyone:

1. What’s the easiest way/place to run wiring through the firewall?

2. Is the negative jump pin under the hood actually wires to the negative terminal of the battery?

3. If not, is there a place under the hood to tap that links directly to the negative terminal on the battery? This is a requirement of the www.switchpros.com switch setup I am using.

4. At the passenger footwell, which wire do I tap for the ignition? 2014 GC Ecodiesel.

If anyone has any threads they can send that show me how to remove the trim at the passenger footwell, I would appreciate it. Also, how to get the front bumper off (which I think is pretty easy, except for the plastic rivets in the wheelwells. Do I have to replace those at the dealership, and is there a special tool for that?)

Thanks in advance. I’m sorry to hijack this thread, but for anyone running lights up front that need switches in the cab, this is a great place to have this info. Thanks.


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Bob, I'm going to jot notes based on our phone calls for others looking for this information in the future...

1) I've not found an "easy" way to get through the firewall, and instead have used the rubber grommets at the bottom of the a-pillar by the doors. There are photos of this in my HAM Radio antenna installation write-up, it's very easy to do versus trying to navigate through the engine bay IMHO.

2 & 3) I've used the jumper cable negative post for the winch without issue, though it doesn't ground directly to the battery itself. Not sure if this worked for you or not.

4) Not sure... but let me know if you find this! I assume this is for your switch lights.

5) Removing the passenger footwell trim is very easy, it pops off and clips in at two points. Reinstalling it isn't super simple, and takes some finesse, but all in all isn't difficult. The front bumper is very easy, and is documented in the Chief Products Hidden Winch installation write-up earlier in this build. I was able to re-use the plastic rivets in the wheel well throughout the multiple times I've removed and reinstalled the lower fascia and front bumper.

Hopefully these answers help!
 

2180miles

Endurance Adventuring
Love your build!! I just went from a built JKU to a 2019 GC Trailhawk. I have been looking at the specs for the roof rack and everything says a 150lbs MAX weight. how were you able to increase the weight limit to be able to support a roof top tent and 2 individuals? If you haven't done anything is there any concern with damage to roof eventually? thanks
Hey Ghost!

Thanks for writing in, sorry for the delay in getting back to you. The 150 lb rating is in fact for dynamic load, aka rolling down the highway at 70 mph. The static load, as TT-Tacoma noted, was for when the vehicle is stopped. Technically speaking the roof and A/B/C/D pillars together can support the weight of the vehicle (think the unlikely event of a rollover) ... that being said, the stress of a roof rack puts pressure on different points of the vehicle.

When I bought and installed the RTT (weight - 130 lbs) I did not want to put a Uneek or Gobi rack on, and I knew Chief Products was working on their own. To support the weight of the tent evenly, and to reduce the "lift" of the tent when driving on the highway or off road, I added a third crossbar at the A-Pillar that is actually mounted to the body. This is the front section of the Thule Traverse system. Used in combination with the Rhino Rack crossbars in the back, it has done a great job at spreading weight over 6 points instead of just 4. The tent is secured at the front and rear most crossbars, and "rests" on the middle one without being connected there. In my mind, that allows flexibility when there's torsion off-road to be absorbed by the mounting points instead of the whole thing being bolted down rock hard to all contact points. -- this has been the reported issue with the FrontRunner system, and why it was/is destroying rooflines...

Mine is NOT a long term solution, but has worked well thus far. My plan will be to install Chief's roof rack product once it's on the market. Our total weight is about 400lbs with myself, Dani, and the tent up there, as a reference point.

Happy to answer any more questions or provide any additional photos.
 

2180miles

Endurance Adventuring
Hey 2180miles

How did the larger tires and added weight affect your mpg’s?

Thanks
Hey Cole,

Larger tires made a negligible impact, maybe 1 MPG. It's tough to tell precisely as I added the RTT three days later, but the change was hardly noticeable. Truthfully the largest impact I've had on fuel economy has actually been the Chief Products Lower Front Guard. I was thinking that the RTT was the biggest drag, but with the tent coming off in November for winter storage, my MPGs have stayed at ~19/20 MPG highway.

Hopefully that helps answer your question. I wouldn't in a million years cite the tires as a large impact on fuel economy.

Ryan
 

TotenUnterhosen

New member
Truthfully the largest impact I've had on fuel economy has actually been the Chief Products Lower Front Guard.
Does this mean that the removal of the lower fascia while leaving the lower front guard exposed has decreased mileage? I suspected that might be the case and since my road/off-road is closer to 80/20 (I wish it were reversed!) I've opted to keep my lower fascia installed unless I know I'm heading out to play.

Love your build. It's provided much inspiration and a wee bit of envy. :)
 

RandomAbstract

Adventurer
Fair enough and the dynamic load makes sense, but is there a place that is documented the total static load that the roof can hold? I"m a big guy and figure the avg RTT is around 118lbs I am 240lbs and say another 150lbs if my wife comes with me. Thats just over 500lbs considering I have the panoramic sunroof I would assume teh integrity of the roof is slightly less then it would be without it. Sorry i'm an engineer so just trying to make sure the numbers work.
I have had the same concern as I have the same weight numbers for my wife and I.

Enjoying your build. I traded my 2011 GC Summit V8 for a 2018 Overland V6 and haven't gotten up the nerve to cut or drill yet. Mad skills!
 

2180miles

Endurance Adventuring
I have had the same concern as I have the same weight numbers for my wife and I.

Enjoying your build. I traded my 2011 GC Summit V8 for a 2018 Overland V6 and haven't gotten up the nerve to cut or drill yet. Mad skills!
Random - totally understand the hesitation to cut and drill... believe me, I had the same. At some point, right around taking off the $300 brake light housing to install the CB a week into owning it, then following up with cutting up the dashboard for the switch panel, I managed to get over it. Still doesn't always feel right, but at some point it became necessary to keep the build going.

Regarding the roof rack, I'll be upgrading to the Chief Products rack as soon as it's available to get away from my makeshift (though seemingly successful) third crossbar set-up. Long run, that'll make me much more comfortable with the tent up top, and will open the ability for awnings and the like to be mounted up top.

Does this mean that the removal of the lower fascia while leaving the lower front guard exposed has decreased mileage? I suspected that might be the case and since my road/off-road is closer to 80/20 (I wish it were reversed!) I've opted to keep my lower fascia installed unless I know I'm heading out to play.

Love your build. It's provided much inspiration and a wee bit of envy. :)
Thanks Toten!! It's been a fun build and I believe is 100% worth it for the inspiration it has provided others to modify their own platforms.

Removing the lower fascia has been the largest degree of degradation to gas mileage/fuel efficiency. By a long shot. Fully loaded across Canada in 2017 we averaged 24 MPG over nearly 10,000 miles. These days, even with the tent removed and a lighter foot in road trips, we average out around 20 MPG.... even with the tent removed! The aerodynamics of the tent itself seem to make almost no difference on that statistic, as with our North Maine Woods/Allagash Wilderness Overland trip last summer we averaged ~19.8 MPG including our 5 days of off-road.

The Lower Front Guard does wonders for the aggressive look of the Jeep and definitely gives me far more assurance off road when I'm finding my own way. Can't say enough about it in the protection regard, which is exactly what it was built for.
 

RandomAbstract

Adventurer
Removing the lower fascia has been the largest degree of degradation to gas mileage/fuel efficiency. By a long shot. Fully loaded across Canada in 2017 we averaged 24 MPG over nearly 10,000 miles. These days, even with the tent removed and a lighter foot in road trips, we average out around 20 MPG.... even with the tent removed! The aerodynamics of the tent itself seem to make almost no difference on that statistic, as with our North Maine Woods/Allagash Wilderness Overland trip last summer we averaged ~19.8 MPG including our 5 days of off-road.
I just came from a Grand Cherokee with a Hemi. 12 in town, 15 on the road, 7 when towing my RV trailer.

18-20 feels like I am dreaming!!! LOL
 
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