Gross vehicle rating & payload

tim87tr

Trails
Hi, first post. I'm researching payload of diesel 3500 and 4500 crew cab chassis in either Ford or Ram, for a custom flatbed, boxes and truck camper. The Rams came out with Limited trim in the chassis this year.

I've not had luck getting a dealer to send me a door tag listing the the GVWR and axle weights. I thought this would be specific to the truck and better info than online. It appears to be around 6000 lb for the dually in both the 3500 and 4500. Anyone have more specific numbers?

Also is anyone running 35" or 37" tire SRW with HD wheels and getting decent payload ratings? Thanks, Tim
 
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tim87tr

Trails
Ok thanks. Looks like an 18 inch Nitro trail grappler has F rating in a few sizes, but 8 bolt only for the Method wheels which would limit it to the 1 ton truck, I think the 4500 is 10 bolt. The payloads appeared similar to me on both trucks, a bit over 6000 lb, with the 1 ton Ram having 14k GVWR and the 4500 at 15k.
 
I think most of the "F" rated tires have the same Load index as the E rated tires (maybe even less), but it does allow for running up to 80 PSI, where the E rated tires drop down to 65 PSI at 35x12 and larger (E2)
 

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Darwin

Explorer
I have a 3500 DRW to SRW conversion with 18" method NV HD wheels 4,500 lbs rating and Falken 37" at3w tires rated at 3,960 lbs at 65 psi. I would stay away from "F" rated tires, they are largely a marketing gimick. My tires are rated to carry the same weight as a "F" rated tire but can do it at 65 psi. I know I don't want to be driving around rock hard 80psi tires.

You can find all the info about weights and dimensions for the Ram on the body builder website. The 4500 is rated for quite a bit.

Keep in mind that the new 2019 rams use a different lug pattern on the rear when in dually form, so you will be unable to complete the conversion that I did since mine is a 2018. Your only option is to go with super single wheels in 20" size, but then you lose a lot of sidewall flex with the lower profile tire, and also add unsprung weight due to the heavier wheels.

I prefer the Ram over the Ford if you are looking at the diesels, not sure about the gas motors.

For the flatbed, I had one custom built that is a 'captive spring mount' design to allow chassis flex without tearing the camper apart, this was done by @mountainguildoverland

You should determine how much payload you need.
 

peculierboy

New member
Here is a shot of my 2018 RAM 4500 crew cab chassis door tag. I have a custom flatbed (Sherptek) , boxes and camper as well.

The 4500 is indeed 10 lug rims.
 

Attachments

Darwin

Explorer
I have been running my F rated 305x65r 18 tires at 65 lbs. rear (6,500 lbs on axle) and 55 front (4,700 lbs. on axle) for 30,000 plus miles and the look like new. Why would anyone run around @ 80 PSI ? With 80 PSI my tires would be crowned and running on the centers.
It sounds like it's working well for you, but I would only take issue with the inflation table of your tires. They are rated at 4,000 lbs at 80 psi, but what is the rating in the rear at 65 PSI? This illustrates an issue I think many people forget when considering tires, and assume that a tire with an "F" rating somehow carries more capacity, it might, but the answer is more nuanced than that. Your set up looks pretty light, so no issue running your tires at 65 psi.
 

billiebob

Well-known member
Hi, first post. I'm researching payload of diesel 3500 and 4500 crew cab chassis in either Ford or Ram, for a custom flatbed, boxes and truck camper. The Rams came out with Limited trim in the chassis this year.

I've not had luck getting a dealer to send me a door tag listing the the GVWR and axle weights. I thought this would be specific to the truck and better info than online. It appears to be around 6000 lb for the dually in both the 3500 and 4500. Anyone have more specific numbers?

Also is anyone running 35" or 37" tire SRW with HD wheels and getting decent payload ratings? Thanks, Tim
So what kind of capacity do you need ?
 

tim87tr

Trails
Thanks for the tag info and as for payload I'd like to get a minimum of 5000 lb. I'm learning a lot and with the 10 lug 4500 and weight capacity of SRW wheels and tires, and my payload goals, I'd better stick with duals. I do like what I see with the Sherptek flat beds and boxes

I still need to look at truck campers in person, but I'd prefer a hard non-slide long bed which are low 3000 dry weight. Something like the ALP adventurer 901 or Cirrus 920. I'd like to carry extra water, a generator, and items for being off grid. The weight will add up quick.

The truck will end up being a base camp only occasionally on Jeep trips. I have a built Jeep that we've explored several Western states on easy to very difficult trails. Remainder of the time we'd be traveling to new locations weekly. We've enjoyed wine country and hiking trails in CA, along with the Rubicon trail once in the Jeep.
 
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tim87tr

Trails
Here is a shot of my 2018 RAM 4500 crew cab chassis door tag. I have a custom flatbed (Sherptek) , boxes and camper as well.

The 4500 is indeed 10 lug rims.
Ok I figured out the quote function on this forum 🙂. This is good info. Do you have a loaded rear axle weight and dry weight of the camper? What did the 4500 offer to choose it over 3500? I was told the brakes are larger and you get somewhat more for GVWR and payload. Thanks
 

peculierboy

New member
I have not weighed my camper/truck combo yet, it's on the list of things to do. If you went to the Sherptek website, you probably saw my truck, it's the one in the video as well.
The choice of 3500 vs 4500 was a no brainer. Bigger capacity, bigger brakes, HD transmission option, flat frame rails, and since we didn't need a bed anyway, the C/C was it. The choice would be between a 4500 and a 5500 in reality. The 5500 came with more capacity and a sway bar, but for the extra cost, we just added a swaybar. We also chose not to get an onboard generator in the Host, so that cut back on weight, we have solar and can hi-amp charge from the RAM, covers everything we need.

If we were getting a non-slide camper, we would have gone with the Cirrus 920, that is a nice unit, but wanted a bit more space.

If you are planning on towing, you really want a 4500/5500 for all the HD upgrades (brakes, trans, weight capacity, etc) to make it easier all around. You can PM me if oyu have specific questions on our rig, we love it!
 

Darwin

Explorer
For your situation, and probably for most people, the dually is a great route to go, more stability, more capacity, safer, and if you get a blow out in the rear with a truck camper on, not as big of a deal.

I debated going with 45/5500, still do, but ultimately ended up with a 3500 cab and chassis, I wanted to stay somewhat light and nimble and needed single rear wheels, duals wouldn't work. I could single out a 5500 but that meant going with heavy steel wheels or extremely expensive aluminum ones, and military tires speed rated at 68 mph that discount tire etc. wouldn't even touch. . I haven't heard much good things about the large 41 " military tires, not to mention the decrease in gas milage. I can get 18-19 unloaded on the highway with my set up, still waiting to see what it is with the camper, if I can squeeze 16 mpg out of it, I am a happy camper, ultimately 14-16 mpg would be great. I don't think the 5500 gets that even unloaded. I do like the tighter turning radius of the 5500 but with going with singles it would have put my front width pretty wide. Since I am planning on a camper weight of max 4000 lbs loaded with everything and only adding 3000- 3500 lbs on the rear axle means I can run my tires if I want at 50 psi in the rear and less up front, lower if and bad dirt roads. I also have a regular cab and that makes a huge difference, all and all though, if you are sticking with the USA and Canada only you won't have any issues going little big with 4500.
 

Bayou Boy

Adventurer
For your situation, and probably for most people, the dually is a great route to go, more stability, more capacity, safer, and if you get a blow out in the rear with a truck camper on, not as big of a deal.

I debated going with 45/5500, still do, but ultimately ended up with a 3500 cab and chassis, I wanted to stay somewhat light and nimble and needed single rear wheels, duals wouldn't work. I could single out a 5500 but that meant going with heavy steel wheels or extremely expensive aluminum ones, and military tires speed rated at 68 mph that discount tire etc. wouldn't even touch. . I haven't heard much good things about the large 41 " military tires, not to mention the decrease in gas milage. I can get 18-19 unloaded on the highway with my set up, still waiting to see what it is with the camper, if I can squeeze 16 mpg out of it, I am a happy camper, ultimately 14-16 mpg would be great. I don't think the 5500 gets that even unloaded. I do like the tighter turning radius of the 5500 but with going with singles it would have put my front width pretty wide. Since I am planning on a camper weight of max 4000 lbs loaded with everything and only adding 3000- 3500 lbs on the rear axle means I can run my tires if I want at 50 psi in the rear and less up front, lower if and bad dirt roads. I also have a regular cab and that makes a huge difference, all and all though, if you are sticking with the USA and Canada only you won't have any issues going little big with 4500.
If you have a full cabover you will get 10-11 mpg with the camper. Been there and that's what it is traveling at interstate speeds. You can't really expect much more with a 12ft tall truck/camper combo. If you have a popup, you'll get what you are looking for at 16 mpg.
 

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tim87tr

Trails
For your situation, and probably for most people, the dually is a great route to go, more stability, more capacity, safer, and if you get a blow out in the rear with a truck camper on, not as big of a deal.

I debated going with 45/5500, still do, but ultimately ended up with a 3500 cab and chassis, I wanted to stay somewhat light and nimble and needed single rear wheels, duals wouldn't work. I could single out a 5500 but that meant going with heavy steel wheels or extremely expensive aluminum ones, and military tires speed rated at 68 mph that discount tire etc. wouldn't even touch. . I haven't heard much good things about the large 41 " military tires, not to mention the decrease in gas milage. I can get 18-19 unloaded on the highway with my set up, still waiting to see what it is with the camper, if I can squeeze 16 mpg out of it, I am a happy camper, ultimately 14-16 mpg would be great. I don't think the 5500 gets that even unloaded. I do like the tighter turning radius of the 5500 but with going with singles it would have put my front width pretty wide. Since I am planning on a camper weight of max 4000 lbs loaded with everything and only adding 3000- 3500 lbs on the rear axle means I can run my tires if I want at 50 psi in the rear and less up front, lower if and bad dirt roads. I also have a regular cab and that makes a huge difference, all and all though, if you are sticking with the USA and Canada only you won't have any issues going little big with 4500.
If you have a full cabover you will get 10-11 mpg with the camper. Been there and that's what it is traveling at interstate speeds. You can't really expect much more with a 12ft tall truck/camper combo. If you have a popup, you'll get what you are looking for at 16 mpg.
I will definitely be looking at 4500 chassis crew cab dually and hard side TC for my travel. Based on research, real life input on this forum, and my experience traveling out West in a Jeep. I think the expedition setups are really neat but I have that already with my built Jeep, and the off road will be a smaller portion of my trips. I'm also will to accept whatever mpg I get with my setup, same with my Jeep when people ask about my mileage 🙂. I don't pay much attention to it, just happy to have been on the adventures and return from the trails safely.
 

Bayou Boy

Adventurer
I'm also will to accept whatever mpg I get with my setup, same with my Jeep when people ask about my mileage 🙂. I don't pay much attention to it, just happy to have been on the adventures and return from the trails safely.
I agree. The truck doesn't move without fuel and it's built to do what i want. The only real consideration is range.
 
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