GOVE Global Overland Vehicle Economical build.

heimbig

OnTheRoadAtLast
#1
GOve Vehicle build:
gove.jpg

GOVE has ‘GO' in it to act as a constant reminder to get off my butt and GO, (maybe I should cancel my Dish subscription now). I don't see anyone with a similar plan (this big and yet fit in a container) so maybe I've missed something really important. Really long term goal is to circumnavigate, which is partly a side effect of all the places we want to go. See build parameter 1 for GO details. Not interested in debate about rent an apartment vs buy vehicle NOR about buying an RV in each area of the world. Those options have their own advantages and probably cheaper, but just not what we want to do.

You can find more concise and up to date build goals at post #50: http://www.expeditionportal.com/for...ehicle-Economical-build?p=1271718#post1271718

Original drawing: View attachment GOVEsuperdutyCamperWithHingedGarage.pdf
edit 10/15/12: Not as long, garage sits on edge of bed, with Phoenix popup built for a flatbed: View attachment GoveBuild-PhoenixCamper.pdf

Vehicle:
This will be our only home. My wife says she'll be considering the camper primarily as our bedroom and the outdoors our living room - I married well. I'm pretty stuck on BAT Big American Truck and while a debate on virtues of BAT vs the world would be interesting, let's do that on some other thread.
The build would be much simpler on a pickup bed or flatbed with extra fuel and pull a custom trailer. I could accomplish all my goals more simply and probably cheaper, though it would be more difficult to get it in a shipping container. However, my biggest concern a trailer (~40' long vs 28' single vehicle) would make everything else about the journey more painful.

Economical:
1)Achieve our desired level of comfort and destinations, as inexpensively as possible but try to avoid unnecessary entanglements with the other 2 “E” Ego and Ecological (but see my last bullet point below).

2) Use ‘off the shelf' components, avoid custom build as much as possible (ergo: I'm not going to buy a vehicle that requires a lot of sound deadening or new seats)

3) KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) and

4) Slow travel is cheap travel, so when we find a cheap place we like we'll stay put.​

Build concepts / parameters (not really designs yet)
Everywhere I say ‘probably' means I really don't know what Ill do, I've read a bunch but have no actual experience with that choice. So for those with experiences I'm all ears.

1. Where are we GOing? It might be easier to describe where we won't go, but I'm not sure there is such a place. We are tired of the cold north (having lived in Eastern Washington all my life) So for now we will avoid cold. My wife and I have traveled and camped our whole life. I've tent camped at both -30F and 100F with 95% humidly, so any vehicle based camp will be luxurious. Like others we planned to sail around the world and prepared ourselves to do it. In the end wife did not like the open ocean and sailing didn't really take us to the places we wanted to go.

Hope to have this whole thing done by May 2013, and make our first trip to Baja (we love Baja and the desert SW) hopefully visit Overland expo too. We'll have a couple years in the USA with the rig, our house, and jobs; then we sell the house and most of our stuff, and retire to a life outside of the U.S.

Itinerary: We will spend significant time in places where we have connections. So, in 2-3 years we retire, drive to Baja for 6 months (a long shakedown cruise), drive to Alaska (or maybe not) ship from west coast or Anchorage and begin our slow trip around the planet in Asia. Explore China, Vietnam, and Cambodia. Spend 1 year in Thailand with friends (or Burma if we can). Head down the Malay Peninsula and ship to Australia and spend a year there. Back to Thailand/Burma for another year. That's 3+ years so far. Head west to India, back to China, Turkey, Spain, (and probably visit more of Europe) then Morocco, Ethiopia, Kenya. Spend 1+ year with friends in Kenya dividing our time between service in E. Kenya and in the Kenya's and Tanzania's national parks. Head south to S Africa and Namibia. Then either back through East Africa to Europe and ship to USA or ship from S. Africa to S. America and slowly make our way back to the USA. 6-10 years total. About 3-5 shipping container moves, and 2 or 3 ‘extended' ferry moves.

2. Basic design goals:
  • Needs to fit in a tall style shipping container (which is 92” (7.6') wide inside and 9.5 feet tall, 38 feet long.) RoRo isn't for us.
  • Roads are narrower elsewhere in the world – so this complements shipping container requirement.
  • That means 7' wide pop-up camper, NON-dually. May need to remove A/C unit to fit container.
  • About 130 Gallon of water, 140Gal Diesel for truck fuel, separate 35 gal diesel for camper heat, water, stove and 35 gal gasoline for generator and motorcycle.

3. To keep the real lifetime cost down I intend to keep this rig forever. So it needs to be useful as a truck after it is no longer used as GOVE.

4. Undeveloped Country Issues. Everything should be hidden (enclosed) and locked. No place to ‘get on' the vehicle when it is moving.

5. Truck will be 2013 F550 chassis cab, diesel, 200” WB, dual alternator (357 amp), Crew cab (I have friends, well my wife does:) . Anticipated Truck mods: DPF Delete, Air boost springs front and rear (probably “Air Lift” pretty cheap maybe too cheap?), air compressor (brand?), ARB lockers in front axle -no good options (IMHO) for the Dana 110 rear so will stick with factory limited slip dif, skid plates (brand), winch front/rear probably Warn 16.5 (even though that really isn't big enough, bigger winch is way more expensive and hydraulic or 24 Volt so I'll double or triple pulley as needed and carry extra cable), probably Rickson DRW to SRW w/ 2 spares and 285/70R19.5 and probably Michelin XZE2+ /XDE2+ tires, probably Bilstein heavy duty Shocks, Sway Bar upgrade (probably Hellwig), probably TrailReady full Bumper.
BTW there are about the same number of authorized Ford SuperDuty repair centers around the world as there are for Mitsu.

6. I'd like a 3' water crossing depth. I know there is a transmission vent that needs to move; what else? Any F-550 people out here who've made the updates to get this thing in 3 feet or so of water? Seems like there is a LOT of electronics in the engine compartment, so probably cannot go much deeper than the top of frame. I notice electronics under the driver's side ‘step'. I'd guess this truck could never be run deeper than 3' of water.

7. (edit: 10/14/12 I've changed my mind, filling a propane tank is hard, replacing tank is ok. Diesel appliances are expensive so propane will also help with build cost. We WILL have propane and an extra large locker that, hopefully, will handle any bottle using the correct adapter)We'll have NO propane; it is too hard to get internationally. Diesel (hot water, furnace and stove top) and electric (refer, convection microwave, supplemental heat, A/C, electric fry pan). Electricity generation: Gasoline Honda Eu3000is generator, and dual truck alternators (equivalent to ~4000 Watt). Electricity will be stored in (probably) 4 x GPL-30HT Lifeline AGM batteries. Additionally we'll have gasoline powered cook stove for emergency use and when we get annoyed with diesel stove top. At this point no solar, see my final point.

8. Fresh water. I'll carry 100 gal plus whatever is in the camper (32 Gal on the Cuchara) But how to filter / purify the drinking water. Seems like a lot of options and we will need a purification system. I read the water purifying thread http://www.expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/82484-Water-purifying/ good stuff. Something like what Hackney or JRhetts did but simplify and not sure about usability and global replacement of the UV light in the hackney rig. So I lean towards some sort of multistage filtering with the best stage only used for drinking water.

9. The camper to truck interface is a problem and is something I'll have custom built. If I cannot get the camper builder to ‘fill-in' under the ‘wings' of the camper (i.e.: have the camper left and right walls extend down to the top of a flatbed ) then I'm planning utility style bed with lots of storage and lots of fuel. I've read the entire discussion on “pivoting frames and mounting campers” – twice. Still don't know what I'll do. But suspect it is a not good idea for a backyard mechanic to attempt any pivot solution. I like what westyss did http://www.expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/48351-out-with-the-old-in-with-the-new/page4 and so far talking to a local shop they are recommending something similar. Likewise ford upfitter info says to spread the weight over the entire frame and the spring systems do this. Planning to finish (paint) the bed with truck bed liner inside and out - funky but practical and very “E”.

10. Storage box/garage. At this point probably build a box across the entire back (so 7' long) attached to bed that swings open in order to get in the camper – kind of a hassle but if built right should be tolerable. Box/garage will hold 1 Honda CRF250L motorcycle (already own), Honda Eu3000is generator, and 2 mountain bikes. None of these items will fit anywhere else. Generator will be configured to run in the box when ‘swung' open. I'll use an electric winch and pulley system to load the motorcycle. Loading winch probably warn cordless PullzAll http://www.warn.com/utility/pullzall/cordless.shtml Box serves as a shoe locker for Dhackney if he ever visits:).

11. Fun stuff we'll carry: Honda CRF250L, 2 Trek Dual Sport bikes (these are the first 3 items we purchased, and they are fun so far!), either solid or probably collapsible kayak or maybe none.

12. The Camper. 7'wide, 9.5'+ long, pop-up, sturdy, pleasant interiors. (update 10/15/12: went with phoenix camper 7'x10' is actually a bit less long overall now.) At this point we are thinking Hallmark Cuchara XL (wood construction) or maybe CC (all composite).

Does anyone make a flatbed, pop-up, 7' wide, side entry camper with a roof 2 people can walk on?
  • Need roof sturdy enough to walk on when up and down. We are photographers and roof access is really important through a roof hatch.
  • Probably roof rack though we don't have plans to use it. It would be nice to know we could.
  • All Diesel and Electric
  • (Relatively) private head.
  • Wet bath is fine
  • Cassette toilet.
  • Someone who will work with us on diesel requirement, battery, 12v, and other issues a typical camper buyer wouldn't think about.
  • Air conditioning.

13. Steal all the good ideas I can find on this site and anywhere else. I'm going to end up with a cross between westyss out with the old in with the new” and carlyle's Alaskanabego and Hackney's BEV.

14. And my final ‘thang'. money=energy.

I don't have plans for solar, everyone seems to want it or have it, but I don't see how it fits. I'll try to stay a-political. For the power you get it seems very expensive and not reliable. If I need only 100 watts per day for a week (well really 50 watts for 24 hours or 100 daily amp hours) - I can add batteries to easily accomplish that goal. If you only need to keep some lights on and a fan you can get by with 50 watts per day (100 Daily amp hours) and can avoid a generator, and solar might make sense, but the number people who can use that little energy is small. (edit 5/17/2015 now that I've had the rig for 2 years 100 daily amp hour is WAY more than I typically use, if I use fans, LEDs, phone/camera chargers, and refrigerator it is more like 20-40 amp hours per day but with microwave or A/C and usage easily jumps over 100 amp hours per day)

In broad generality I find that the more expensive something is the more energy was required to produce it. So the people who spend the least on their vehicle have probably consumed the least amount of energy too. It takes 4-6 years of daily usage to recover the amount of energy that was used to build a solar panel. Since most solar panels are made in China and assuming a 20 year life on your vehicle at 1/4 time usage, then for the entire life of solar power on an expedition vehicle you'll be burning Chinese coal. How is that ecological?

Another issue with Solar is it produces too little power to fully charge the AGM batteries and partial charges are hard on AGM battery.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Baloo

"The Bear Necessities"
#2
Sounds like agreat project, just one question, why a Ford F550? While I love Ford's myslef, how hard will it be to get parts for that 6.7l (only truck that uses that engine to my understanding). Why not look towards something more common on a global scale?
 

heimbig

OnTheRoadAtLast
#3
Good question. There are several reasons, and everyone has to balance various factors for themselves. In my opinion the common 'global' deliver trucks are too small/not sufficiently heavy duty, uncomfortable, don't have such good support for 3rd party add-ons here in the USA, DPF delete kit availability in particular, older units have lower crash safety (I'm old but I still want to live:)), a USA purchased 'global' delivery truck will have lots of parts and tech that is not in the trucks sold/serviced outside of USA. The more heavy duty 'global' trucks are not so common and therefore less global. Lots of people avoid some of the problems above by purchasing older trucks which makes some of the other issues more of a problem. So, I don't see that there is an easy answer.

The superduty is more global than you might think as there are Superduty services centers in every region of the world. Unfortunately, they tend to concentrate in areas of oil production. I have contacted others who travel globally with a superduty and it hasn't been a problem for them. If the engine goes, I'm in a world of hurt no matter what vehicle I have, but depending on the country the 6.7 will be a bigger problem. Additional factor: I'm pretty handy and global freight can deliver almost anywhere:).
 
#4
My "world travels" were in a Volvo wagon so I'm not one to advise perhaps, but I'd suggest you start weighing your expected provisions and load, you have over of ton of fuel and water. I'd also suggest you consider what your electrical needs are, what does the fridge take, A/C, toys, etc. I'd try to get by with as little as possible, much of your 12V needs could probably be solar. People usually buy stuff along the way on any trip, but they have to have room for it until they can ship it back.

I'm not sure how many Ford dealers there are in China or Viet Nam, I'd consider a Euro vehicle Mitsu, BM, Izzu etc. Your Honda will be at home anywhere on the planet to go chase parts, good idea.

If you think you'll have a great water usuage, a watermaker might work for you.

I'd also zero in with google map and other sources and study the terrain and conditions to be traveled. IMO, proper prior planning prevents the loss of money, time, unnecessary efforts and disasters. Since you said you have no idea where you would go, how do you know what vehicle you really need? Just going big and heavy isn't the best way for overlanding or exploring and wait til you get six blocks up a narrow street only to find a parked car. Bridges can be a problem too.

If you intend on getting off road in Asia or Europe, they have low overhanging branches on trees, propably at the worst possible spot, and it's my understaning that you can't just go blazing off road like we do here, while road conditions may be rough, you'll likely be restricted to roadways.

If your vehicle is nothing more than the bedroom and the outdoors is the livingroom, you might get by with a much smaller vehicle and a small trailer. Lots of choices.

I'd look to the type of driving required and fit the vehicle to the need, but I also understand the motorhome approach. But the bigger you are the more restricted you'll be.

You have a huge voyage ahead, I'd research, research and research it until I recognized the places along the way.
 

heimbig

OnTheRoadAtLast
#5
I'm certainly not bragging here but there are authorized super duty centers in laos, cambodia and mongolia (but not vietnam, china, or thailand - lots of dealers though in those countries)
The made for America, built in Thailand, Honda 250 will likely not have any better support in asia (or africa) since a 250 is huge (outside of NA) and i've never seen any off road bike in Thailand.

the water and fuel for us is mostly about staying out for a long time, and probably won't be used as much for going deeper into the backcountry.

By saying we don't know where we will go is really to say we are flexible and can't predict the future. But we have visited a few places and have a some idea what the 'road' situation is. While it is true you can access most of the planet on paved and 'bad roads' and and another chunk of the planet on roads frequented by local delivery trucks and the next level of 'old beater 2wd pickup roads', this is a catagory that we know we will want to visit and i think with high clearnce, low(ish) Center of Gravity, and 4x4 we'll be ok, but I'm certainly not building a sand rig or rock cawler.

Watermaker is something I'ld consider but really uses a lot of Watts, has the advantage of using salt water.

Of course Watt requirement can all be resolved by walking or Biking and I've done both for weeks, but my wife isn't interested - she's also not going by Volvo wagon, SUV, or pickup:) - been there done that.
 
Last edited:

sg1

Adventurer
#6
Hi,
you have a great project. When I retired a few years ago and my wife and I decided to explore the globe essentially full time in an expedition vehicle we had very similar questions. After being on the road for over 2 years mostly in Africa a few observations:
Your choice of vehicle is certainly unusual, but why not (I have a Ford and it does the job). It meets the basic requirements (solid, good ground clearance, can carry a lot of weight, no DMF). I would not worry too much about parts availability, because they are not available anyway and can easily be shipped. Even a Toyota or Mitsu sold in the US will have few common parts with their counterparts in Asia or Africa even if they look similar. Make sure you have tires in a common size. These you will have to get locally because they are expensive to ship.
You carry a lot of diesel and water. Even when I crossed the Sahara on old forgotten French military tracks in the 80´s I never needed more than 1,000 miles range. Water is easily available in all countries I visited (locals have often no indoor plumbing and rely on fountains or wells) and 25-30 gallons would be enough for a week even with daily showers (if water is used sparingly). Even with a heavy duty rig weight puts a lot of strain on the system.
Propane or no propane: One of my most difficult decisions. I decided on propane but without a fixed tank. Diesel heater and hot water works fine but they need a lot of elelctricity and above 6,000ft you need a high altitude kit or better a second fuel pump to compensate for the lack of oxygen. Not a killer, but an additional complication. I do not like diesel cooktops. They are slow to heat up, difficult to regulate and they only have 2 burners (of the 2 only one works properly). Propane is readily available anywhere because locals usually cook with propane and clean and easy to use. You need lots of adapters though to get your tank(only mobile tanks, 20 lb is fine) filled. A friend of mine who did not want propane either eventually scrapped his diesel cooktop and got an electrical induction system. Works great if you have enough batterie capacity.
We found that a good bed, a good shower and toilet (only casette, their are no grey or black water diposal facilities in the 3rd world) and enough room to move and relaxe in your cabin are more important than a winch or offroad capabilities. In most countries in Latin America or Asia there are very few (if any) campsites (and if you find one you may not like their facilities) but a lot of people almost anywhere who are very curious. You will have surprisingly few spots where you can sit outside your truck unobserved somewhere in the boonies. If you travel for several months or even years your truck is your home (and your castle in bad weather or densly populated regions). Make it comfortable.
A walk through from the drivers cabin to the "living quarters" is great (if you can lock it with a solid door). It is so convenient if you can walk back to the fridge or the washroom if it rains or if you are on a game drive where you are not allowed to leave your vehicle.
Where ever possible use standard household (faucets, pipes sinks etc.) or industrial parts instead of parts designed for recreational vehicles. Standard parts can be found in any local hardware shop, rv parts are unavailable in the 3rd world.
But most importantly: Do not worry too much and have fun. We never regretted that we went "on the road" and so far we had no problem with crime, health or the truck. Right now we are on our way through Namibia, Botswana, Zimbbwe, Sambia, Mozambique to Tansania to see the great migration in the Serengeti in January and love every minute of it.
Save travels
Stefan
 

heimbig

OnTheRoadAtLast
#7
Propane or no propane: One of my most difficult decisions. I decided on propane but without a fixed tank.Stefan
For sure each has advantages and as I read a bit more it sounds like the major problem with propane has more to do with re-filling rather than availability. I'll have alternatives to whatever I choose as my primary heat source (I already own a camping stove the can burn gasoline, diesel, or kerosine and I'll have electricity generateed with gasoline or diesel); so propane is looking better. Perhaps I just need the right adaptors and a place for the various sized tanks and I'll be ok. Anyone have data about propane availability in SE asia? (NA and SA, Europe, Africa, Australia, China all appear to have propane) maybe I'll email my friends in Thailand and see what they know (edit 10/4/12: propane is available at every gasoline station in Thailand. In NA, Australia, and Thailand all promote gas/propane/lpg as alternative to petrol. From other posts at expeditionportal it seems propane is avialable in SA and Africa)

We found that a good bed, a good shower and toilet (only casette, their are no grey or black water diposal facilities in the 3rd world) and enough room to move and relaxe in your cabin are more important than a winch or offroad capabilities.
Good advise we are looking at campers next week - traveling to Denver to see first hand several builders.

A walk through from the drivers cabin to the "living quarters" is great (if you can lock it with a solid door). It is so convenient if you can walk back to the fridge or the washroom if it rains or if you are on a game drive where you are not allowed to leave your vehicle.
Really good advice, with a camper a 'crawl through' maybe all we can accomplish but since it isn't esential all the time having that option when it is needed is valuable.

Where ever possible use standard household (faucets, pipes sinks etc.) or industrial parts instead of parts designed for recreational vehicles.
Also good advice, and I'll follow through with camper builders next week.

But most importantly: Do not worry too much and have fun. We never regretted that we went "on the road" and so far we had no problem with crime, health or the truck. Right now we are on our way through Namibia, Botswana, Zimbbwe, Sambia, Mozambique to Tansania to see the great migration in the Serengeti in January and love every minute of it.
Save travels Stefan
thanks Stefan, we are really looking forward to a change in scenery.
Bruce
 
Last edited:

sg1

Adventurer
#9
Hi Bruce,
your truck looks interesting. A couple of observations.
I did not see your second spare tire. In my view a 2nd spare tire is important if you go on an overland trip, especially if you have a tire size which you do not get in every village.
The box with the bikes will be heavy. I would guess about 600lb a long way from your rear axle. If you drive a lot on bad roads or tracks you will have to attach such a weight to your frame or at least a very solid subframe. With a side entrance (which means a platform) this will be a lot easier to engineer than with a rear entrance because you avoid a hinge.
Pay a lot of attention to the engineering of your cabover. I have seen a few cabovers with cracks where they connect to the sidewalls. Do not underestimate the destructive power of a few thousand miles of washboard.
Personally I would not trust a wood frame especially when after a while moisture got into the walls. I had this problem and I will not buy woodframe again. Mine is SCS (Structural Composite Sandwich) and it is very strong and well insulated and you have no problem with moisture in the walls. A friend of mine has now been traveling for 7 years fulltime with a big MAN truck (they are not known to be softly sprung) through South America and Africa and he is now on his 3rd set of springs but his cabin ( made of SCS) does not have a single crack. A well engineered welded aluminum frame would be ok too.
Have you looked at XP campers? From what I can see (I have never really inspected them in detail) they look very well made.
Regards Stefan
 

heimbig

OnTheRoadAtLast
#10
Spares, 'swing-out' garage, and camper structure.

I did not see your second spare tire. In my view a 2nd spare tire is important if you go on an overland trip, especially if you have a tire size which you do not get in every village.
I'll have 2 spares mounted left and right behind rear wheels under the bed.

How do i know what tires sizes are available, certainly 19.5 inch should be fairly available and in a pinch I could buy 2 smaller 19.5 and put them in the front (and not use 4x4) until I can find the right size. BUT will I find 285/70R19.5? how would I find out? Would any Michelin dealer be able to order them?

The box with the bikes will be heavy. I would guess about 600lb a long way from your rear axle. With a side entrance (which means a platform) this will be a lot easier to engineer than with a rear entrance because you avoid a hinge.
Agree and is a concern. My weight estimate is also in that range so I'm considering building the grarage with aluminum that would save maybe 100 lbs. The 'swing-out' garage does allow me to put the heaver motorcycle right against the back of the camper. Swing-out (which will have sturdy locks) will also makes the back door VERY secure. When closed the garage will be supported all along the bottom front edge - as well as the hinges and latches. The truck can handle it, and since I'm having the bed custom built I should be able to make it strong enough too.

SCS (Structural Composite Sandwich) and it is very strong and well insulated and you have no problem with moisture in the walls. Have you looked at XP campers? From what I can see (I have never really inspected them in detail) they look very well made.
Regards Stefan
XP camper is well tested and I'd be pretty confident with it. It certainly fits my requirements very well. It has a stark interior and is pricey, and it doesn't accomodate my garage idea very well - but we haven't eliminated it yet. Hallmark offers all composite camper construction and they extend the warrantee 3 years (vs. wood) so they must think it is pretty good. We'll be visiting Hallmark and other Campers in the Denver area next week and we will have to decide soon.
-Bruce
 
Last edited:

sg1

Adventurer
#11
To check tire availability in the countries I am traveling to I checked the websites of tire dealers and I enquired at customer support of a few tire manufacturers. When I explained in my mail why I needed this information they usually were very helpful.
regards Stefan
 

heimbig

OnTheRoadAtLast
#12
camper choice

My wife and I visited Denver last week to look over the primary competition in the area of pop up campers. We are about to 'pop' on a new Phoenix custom build.
We wanted side door, flatbed, 100gal water and that was no problem for Phoenix (really nice people Rob and Cari- we went back late in the day and they took the time to really go over our requirements - which are mammoth)
 
Last edited:

heimbig

OnTheRoadAtLast
#13
Phoenix camper A/C Genset requirements

Besides the above big items in my camper want list, Phoenix does not generally use a rooftop A/C unit which thus lowers the center of gravity, lowers the height, eliminates something on the roof to catch branches, and uses much less energy. I want a generator 1000 watts above the requirements of the A/C unit (to charge batteries/have spare power) so I'd been planning a 3000 watt GenSet. Smaller A/C (1000 watt) means a much lighter and smaller (and more economical) 2000 watt Generator. With a smaller genset I'm not forced to store/use it in my garage and instead can put it in a storage locker in the camper or truck bed.

My whole power system is now cheaper, lighter, lower center of gravity, and smaller. Also, I'll be able to drive right in to a shipping container.

All above makes me pretty happy.:smiley_drive:
 
Last edited:

heimbig

OnTheRoadAtLast
#14
The water, I'll need some - clean

Here is where I am for water. Thanks to Phoenix popup I'll have 100 Gallon h2o inside the camper. I've stolen my water purification ideas directly from the water purifying thread http://www.expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/82484-Water-purifying/ and freshwatersystems.com

  • Outside ‘pre' filter system that will be in an outside accessible box in the camper:


  • Tank water I will also purify with clorine either tablets or bleach - or some other commercial product.
 
Last edited:
#15
Sounds like a dream project. I'll be following this one till the end.

I do have a comment on the power usage and solar. I discovered after cooking yet another deep cycle battery in my t/c that there are better options. If you have the time, look up this site for solar info. http://handybobsolar.wordpress.com/ You may be surprised at what you can accomplish with it. I sure was.
With a moderate solar set up, you could supplement your generating with your truck. This could allow you to carry less weight and maybe save some room and money (no generator and perhaps fuel for said generator plus cheaper more readily available batteries). I do understand what you were saying about the cost (physical and environmental) in making the solar panels and re-couping said costs. That coupled with the savings of not having to buy/fix/operate/carry a generator may be worth it in the end.

This being said, I have not gone solar yet but if I ever follow through with my dream plans, I'll be likely going that route on a rig much like your own. Your planning and forethought on this is nothing short of amazing.
 
Top