Go Fast Campers- taught enough in winds?

NudeLobster

Member
Hey guys,

I currently have a Tepui softshell and have been wanting to switch to a hardshell for a while. one of many reason is wind noise. Our tepui flaps and flutters in winds and keeps us up all night if we are in high desert winds.

I've been pretty much sold on an alucab since I decided to strive for a hardshell but the GFC RTT is really appealing to me. I was already planning to mount the alucab straight to the rack mounting points on my GX for maximum low profile, and was already planning to mount my lighting and awning straight to the alucab via drill/bolt/seal. the GFC beats the alucab in both those departments.

Anyways, back on topic, I can't help but notice in all my research of photos and videos that the GFC doesn't look like the gas struts hold the tent sides very taught. I could totally be wrong- I haven't been able to see one in person like I have JBs and alucabs.

Does anyone have first hand use of a GFC camper or RTT sleeping in wind that could chime in?
 

Crazy Schooner

Fortune's A Mistress
I was in the same boat as you regarding soft shell tents. The wind noise alone is why hardhsell tents are worth their weight. I had an alu-cab tent and slept in some crazy windy condtions. The tent was solid in that regard and if I buy another expensive RTT, I'd probably give GFC a try once their wait times settle down. If it helps, the struts on the alucab had quite a bit of oxidization when I sold it. The GFC seems to be much easier to service for small maintenance things like the struts and it'll be easier to mount then alucabs weird side rail setup. If someone who owns one can chime in regarding wind noise and it's positive, I'd go that route.
 

crazysccrmd

Observer
I haven’t had issues with wind noise, definitely nothing like my previous ARB RTT. The one night it was pretty windy I faced the wedge into the wind and wasn’t bothered at all.
 

NudeLobster

Member
I haven’t had issues with wind noise, definitely nothing like my previous ARB RTT. The one night it was pretty windy I faced the wedge into the wind and wasn’t bothered at all.
That's good to hear! I was just thinking of it, as well. With the tent portion being 6", 3" on each half, is there enough room to store bedding and pillows up there, or will it not close properly?
 

crazysccrmd

Observer
That's good to hear! I was just thinking of it, as well. With the tent portion being 6", 3" on each half, is there enough room to store bedding and pillows up there, or will it not close properly?
Some people have been able to store lightweight down backpacking quilts but that’s about it. GFC has a thinner mattress they’ve been testing or may have already implemented that provides a little more space when closed but apparently doesn’t compromise on comfort.
 

80t0ylc

Hill & Gully Rider
Yeah, it looks like the bedding is extremely limited to what you can keep in it when closed. But, wow, I'm impressed. My only other concern is the struts being out in the elements. These have a limited life in a protected environment. I'm wondering how they'll hold up. Might want to keep a spare set in the rig.

https://gofastcampers.com/

Nice and innovative product line! And built in Montana USA. I am especially interested in the Camper. Really ups the possibilities of using a pickup for an overlanding rig. Basic, but flexible & effective. We've all seen the typical boxy pop up campers that we assumed were the best compromise for comfort and agility. Alu-Cab's Canopy camper is awesome, but a $9.5K base + options is hard to swallow. It'll be interesting to see GFC's price on both the RTT & the Camper.
 
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NudeLobster

Member
Not being able to store bedding inside the tent is a dealbreaker for me. At least half the advantage/purpose of the RTT is to keep the bed "made," and not have to transport/setup/pack things separately.
agreed. That, combined with no right side entry, killed the idea dead in the water for me. Back to the taller Alucab.

GFC is 6", on a 4runner on 34s at 6' 9.5".

Not that some random prospective buyer would ever drive a design change or new model when they can't even keep up with current orders, but making each half 4" for an 8" total height to give an extra couple inches for pillows and bedding while still keeping (barely) under 7' residential garage door sounds like even hotter hot cake sales to me.

my 270 awning is going to be on driver side and I'd like to have access to tent when awning is open and kitchen in back is open, so i really want a right side entrance. Granted, I could close awning or kitchen if really need be but I'd rather not have that constraint. That's a much more individual need/want. An extra 2" for bedding/pillows is much more universal, I think. It's not like 2" is going to negate the "GoFast" nature. I'm confident they'd be 100% as huckable.

-Justin
 

eatSleepWoof

Explorer
I didn't even realize they only had entry on one side. That's crazy.

It's not like 2" is going to negate the "GoFast" nature. I'm confident they'd be 100% as huckable.
IMO the "GoFast" aspect is nothing but marketing. No one is racing down the desert with a (any) RTT attached. And the GFC RTT, at 135lb, is not a lightweight by any stretch of the imagination. I drove with a JB RTT (160lbs) and hundreds of pounds of other gear up high, (for about 8 months) and never found myself unable to do anything I wanted. Lower weight is always nice, but 25lbs is not going to make a difference between "going fast" and "not."

Consider the Eezi Awn hard-shell RTTs. I believe they are fairly heavy (200lbs?), but they have some nice things going for them.
 

crazysccrmd

Observer
IMO the "GoFast" aspect is nothing but marketing. No one is racing down the desert with a (any) RTT attached. And the GFC RTT, at 135lb, is not a lightweight by any stretch of the imagination. I drove with a JB RTT (160lbs) and hundreds of pounds of other gear up high, (for about 8 months) and never found myself unable to do anything I wanted. Lower weight is always nice, but 25lbs is not going to make a difference between "going fast" and "not."
These guys and a lot of buyers have most assuredly been racing down the desert way faster and harder than most people ever will. Good luck keeping up with them with a heavy RTT and hundreds of pounds of other gear up top like you said.
 

eatSleepWoof

Explorer
These guys and a lot of buyers have most assuredly been racing down the desert way faster and harder than most people ever will. Good luck keeping up with them with a heavy RTT and hundreds of pounds of other gear up top like you said.
I'll rephrase: most folks are not racing down...

I'm sure there are a half dozen people in the world who do, in fact, "go fast" (LOL) with a RTT on the roof. I'm also sure that there are about a million other factors coming into play which contribute to one's ability to "go fast," that the tent is a tiny and possibly insignificant part of those factors, and that 99% of RTT owners never have and never will even attempt to "go fast."

I'll take the "Go Fast" slogan seriously when I start seeing GFC tents on top of Dakar vehicles, instead of Jim Bob's (or whatever his name is) instagram. It's a great name from a marketing point of view, but that's it.
 

Wallygator

Adventurer
I didn't even realize they only had entry on one side. That's crazy.



IMO the "GoFast" aspect is nothing but marketing. No one is racing down the desert with a (any) RTT attached. And the GFC RTT, at 135lb, is not a lightweight by any stretch of the imagination. I drove with a JB RTT (160lbs) and hundreds of pounds of other gear up high, (for about 8 months) and never found myself unable to do anything I wanted. Lower weight is always nice, but 25lbs is not going to make a difference between "going fast" and "not."

Consider the Eezi Awn hard-shell RTTs. I believe they are fairly heavy (200lbs?), but they have some nice things going for them.

I think you can get one made with an opening on either side. Would have to ask them to make sure.

Also don't forget that with your JB RTT you have the weight of a rack to account for. With the GFC RTT and certain vehicles, like the 4Runner, FJ, etc...you do not need a rack. The tent bolts to the stock rack anchor points saving the weight of a rack and traditional RTT. That being said I agree, it needs to have storage for at least bedding so you don't have to find another spot for your bedding and have to make/breakdown the bed everyday.
 

crazysccrmd

Observer
That being said I agree, it needs to have storage for at least bedding so you don't have to find another spot for your bedding and have to make/breakdown the bed everyday.
An extra five minutes to stuff your bedding in a stuff suck is a good tradeoff in my opinion. I was able to store bedding and pillows in my old RTT and don’t find myself missing the ability now.
 

80t0ylc

Hill & Gully Rider
An extra five minutes to stuff your bedding in a stuff suck is a good tradeoff in my opinion. I was able to store bedding and pillows in my old RTT and don’t find myself missing the ability now.
To each their own. Living on the road for weeks/months at a time has different consequences, though. The GFC lineup presents some awesome possibilities, but you can't escape the premise that storage is reduced when the closed height is less. I like the GFC Camper for a pickup. It would make extra bedding & RTT items storage a no-brainer, but this doesn't work for an overlanding SUV style rig. I guess unless I change to a pkup, I'll keep my CVT hardshell.
 
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