Give me your best 3 hikes...please

newhue

Adventurer
Found this in a blog here http://marc.merlins.org/perso/hiking/post_2007-08-18_2007-08-10-17_-John-Muir-Trail-from-Bishop-Pass-to-Mt-Whitney.html. Its a little old but surely it's not this hard if so popular. I have bought a bicycle from a junk shop in the past and ridden it back 10km to the trail start after dropping the car at the trail end; but 6-8 hours in a car is something different.

from blog
I had no desire to do the lonely and long 6-8 hour two car drive to Lonepine and Bishop to have a car waiting for us at the exit while leaving the first car at the entrance, so I managed to find a plane I was able to rent for 10 days (which is a bit hard to do), and we ended up flying to Bishop (the other option being to fly to lonepine and catching a bus to Bishop, which was a bit iffy if you missed the bus).
Of course, this now meant that we had to find a ride from bishop airport to city center, one from the hotel to the trail head the next day, and then one from Lonepine back to Bishop at the end. This isn't as easy as it seems because there is virtually no public transportation there (Bishop has a dial a ride system which doesn't work on weekends), and no taxis. Luckily, we found some nice locals who offered their driving services for a fee. Getting dropped at South Lake Trailhead in Bishop was $50, and getting a ride back from Whitney Portal Trailhead, through Lonepine and to Bishop was $100, which was actually a good price considering it's a 1H+ drive.

no enterprising hiking transfer business popped up that anyone is aware of up?
 

plainjaneFJC

Goofball
I guess you mean hiking off designated trails? I didn't need a permit to hike to bottom and back.
If you want to hike the canyon, you will have to get in front of the permit process at the appropriate time. It's complicated, but I can help with it. The Grand Canyon is really arduous hiking. The bottom is a full 5,000 feet 1.4 km DOWN. So crawling out can be tough. I know of a few off the beaten path trips in the 4 day range that are possitiely amazing. I can give specifics via PM if you like. You have to get your permits a few months in advance, but no sooner that four months out.

I would also advocate trips in the Sierras in Callifornia. Yosemite is stunning as are the trails in Sequoia Kings.
 

Co-opski

Expedition Leader
1. Kalalau Trail, Na Pali Coast Kauai Island, Hawaii State Park.
2. Kesugi Ridge Trail, Denali State Park, Alaska.
denali small.jpg
3. Salkantay Trail, Peru.
 
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gorillamel

Dirty Blonde
All in Idaho:

Sawtooth Wilderness (within the Sawtooth National Recreation Area)


Owyhee Mountains in S Idaho (Bruneau Canyon, Succor Creek and Leslie Gulch are pretty cool areas. As is Big Jacks Canyon accessed via Parker Trail)


Not a hard one, but Sunset Mountain near Idaho City remains one of my favs.
 

jpachard

Adventurer
I will second Salkantay in Peru. We did it a few years ago and it was fantastic. We also did Annapurna this past Christmas. Despite the claims now that more is road, these road sections can be avoided to some extent. Going during Christmas was great as well as we only saw a dozen or so other trekkers. Apparently in high season it’s like ants on a log.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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