Gas - Plastic or metal

vermonter4life

New member
Back on the farm we always had inexpensive, plastic 5 gal gas cans. A piece of lashing and they road in the back of the truck into the field to rescue a tractor or up into the woods if the skidded needed juice or the power saws.
That was in yesteryears, now I need to bring some extra fuel in my Tundra as pulling my bigfoot trailer it sucks the go-go juice. Heading into some areas with fuel stations few and far between.

Standard gas can is cheep and can ride in the bed of the truck for a week. Piece of rope and it should be fine. When I get home, I'll dump the fuel into the truck and store the can empty.

Or get a fancy metal can with a bracket and holder and mount it in the truck bed. This option will cost me about $100.

Unless Im missing something, I say go with the cheep, standard can?
 

WOODY2

Adventurer
Scepter without a doubt. If they serve the Marines in a war zone you know the farm or back of pickup is safe with them.
 
Scepter military jugs aren't sold on the commercial market here in the States. Thanks California

The Scepter cans sold commercially are not the same quality as the military version plus you are stuck with that stupid nozzle.

If you want military quality the Waverian NATO metal cans are available commercially and has a great easy to use nozzle. Don't get the CARB version.
 

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A few years ago I went back to metal cans (the old WW2 style) as the plastic ones seem always to smell, especially in a warm car. Zero smell from metal ones, also don't swell up like plastic ones. I guess if I had a ute and not a wagon I'd still be using plastic ones.
 

Peter_n_Margaret

Adventurer
If I needed a dozen fuel containers and you gave me some metal ones, I would say "no thanks" and go and buy some good quality plastic ones.
I have some that are 20+ years old. Never had a failure, no smells, no rust, tough as old boots.
They swell until the internal pressure stops further evaporation. That is what is supposed to happen. Same happens with the steel ones, except steel eventually fatigues with the stress and plastic does not.
Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
 

ZMagic97

Explorer
I'm huge on the metal cans. I live in the Phoenix area, so high heat kills the plastic and causes swelling, and the metal isn't subject to rust.

I currently keep 5 NATO cans in my garage for all the vehicle needs. On my long work weeks, I stop once a week for fuel and refuel midweek at home with the cans. No leaks, smells, etc.

The metal are more money, but I have never had issues with them. I will mount one in the bed (via a WWII style holder) for trips, as I do n;t want it bouncing or becoming a projectile in case of an accident.
 

Laps

Active member
Plastic cans for the home utility equipment: chain saw, tractor (diesel), pressure washer, leaf blower etc.

Metal cans (Wavian NATO) for travel/overlanding/exploring, and secured in the truck bed.
 

pluton

Adventurer
A few years ago I went back to metal cans (the old WW2 style) as the plastic ones seem always to smell, especially in a warm car. Zero smell from metal ones, also don't swell up like plastic ones. I guess if I had a ute and not a wagon I'd still be using plastic ones.
This has been my observation with the Scepter MFCs. Great ruggedness and product quality, but if you have to store them in a smell-sensitive location, good quality, non-CARB metal (Wavian or =) transmits less odor. My observation.
 

jgaz

Adventurer
I use a 20L Wavian can to store fuel in my shed here in Phoenix.
I like that there is no smell at all and I can open the can without a wrench even after it’s been stored at 120+ degrees. YMMV
 

old .45

Observer
I concur with jags..... Wavin cans are the best for all seasons,,,. been using them for years with the old style opening and spout.... no problems whatsoever.
 

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Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
I've never had a problem with the cheap 5 gallon ones from Wal-Mart. Buuut I'm also not strapping them on or inside of a vehicle.
 

2.ooohhh

Member
The cans have to be air tight for reasonable storage of ethanol laced fuel due to it's propensity to absorb water so I only run nato quality steel or specter mfc. In canada mfc due to the ease of finding them and components in the US it will be wavians until I can slowly import enough new MFCs from up north for personal use.
 
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