Gas can kill.

rnArmy

Adventurer
View attachment 541484

Really love the new color of your vehicles! Someone should consider marketing that as a paint choice for new SUV’s and trucks. Maybe the military can look into this too. Nice matte finish, not too gray, not too khaki, not too green. Beats Coyote Tan by a country mile!
And this is really high-tech "paint". If you got it wet, it took on a different shade, so now two vehicles would ever look exactly the same. You can see the shading in the picture.
 

gatorgrizz27

Active member
It's weird how much argument seems to arise from something that should be pretty simple.

It is self evident the fuel is a nonzero safety risk due to flammability. It is self evident the fuel is a nonzero hassle to carry. It is self evident the fuel is a nonzero weight penalty which has nonzero consequences on the kinetics and longevity of the vehicle to which it is mounted. It is self evident the equipment with which to carry additional fuel bears a nonzero financial expense.

So if we want to exercise self preservation and thrift, we should desire to not carry fuel unless it is strictly necessary for the action we intend to take. This is an objective conclusion.

And yet somehow it's controversial! :unsure:
If I’m reading your argument correctly, it’s don’t carry spare fuel unless you need it. I’d be willing to wager most here don’t do that, as this isn’t a mall crawler forum. So what, exactly, is your point?
 

pluton

Adventurer
Here's how I approach spare gas on my slow speed 4WD excursions:
1. Carried on the rear in city traffic or at high speed freeway traffic is a bad idea. Once on your dirt adventure begins, where the chances of being rear-ended are nil, it doesn't matter.
2. Carried on the roof (the way I do it, IF I do it) is less dangerous than the rear bumper in everyday traffic, but in severe crash/rollover adds hazard and upsets the center of gravity, which someday, somewhere, might matter. Once on your dirt adventure begins, it doesn't matter, unless there's a center of gravity issue, as on a sidehill.
3. Carried inside the vehicle (mine's a 4Runner) has the potential of gas vapor stinking up the inside and adds hazard in case of severe crash. Again, except for the smell, once off pavement, it doesn't matter as much. (See Tom Sheppard's solo trip in Algeria in the G-Wagen with, what was it?...8 jerry cans inside the vehicle?
 

jeff parker

Observer
I was amazed at the number of rigs carrying fuel on the trails around Silverton/Ouray. You are never more than 20 miles from gas station in that area. Did they all drive through the Yukon to get to Colorado?
 

shade

Well-known member
I was amazed at the number of rigs carrying fuel on the trails around Silverton/Ouray. You are never more than 20 miles from gas station in that area. Did they all drive through the Yukon to get to Colorado?
Maybe they were empty. Hard to say, but I know people that display them on their daily drivers because Overland!
 
Sure, gasoline / petrol have always made me a little nervous to carry...for me, extra fuel carried along is ONLY diesel and ONLY in NATO cans.

YMMV
20190722_090541.jpg20190722_090541.jpg
 

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krick3tt

Adventurer
I carry two NATO cans under my LR where the spare used to go. Now I have a custom rear bumper with the spare on a swing away carrier. I have carried extra petrol on the roof on occasion but prefer to carry things on the roof rack that are non explosive like extra water and clothes in a low profile surplus medical box. I do carry my 10 pound propane tank up there though.
I am aware that the COG is somewhat compromised by the water weight but I do drive with that knowledge foremost in my mind. The weight of the vehicle does, I feel confident, help keep the greasy side down. I had the weight checked at a vehicle inspection station, fully loaded for a week excursion, it came in at a surprising 7800 pounds.
 

lilkia

Active member
Low on the list until it happens.

It's at the top of my list.

Again, most people will never roll their vehicle, or so they think.

In sixty plus years of off roading I've seen more than my share of death. It's my observation in this new classification of camping called "overland ". I see fuel carried in dangerous ways.

I'm just trying to help others think about what they are doing.
Im more concerned that you think this is a NEW style of camping than I am with my external tanks rupturing. This "overlanding" has been around since the advent of the car. The only new thing about it is the stupid word "overlanding". Its called driving. Some people just choose to "drive" off of paved roads and then sleep outside of a hotel, either on the ground, in the vehicle, or in a tent. I saw someone on here call driving up the beach on South Padre Island in their full size SUV "overlanding". Cheese and rice Ive driven our Legacy sedan all the way to the east cut its not difficult, hell its not even adventurous. Its roughly 30 miles of hard packed sand its no different than driving on Miami beach.

It seems that word "Overlanding" has been appropriated by thousands of those that throw a rack on the roof of whatever and drive down dirt roads smoother than the driveway to my farm. Someone please explain why every kind of activity has to have some weird kitchy new name for it? Is that the so the vendors and manufacturers can get the hipster millenial types interested? They make it the new cool edgy thing to do and youre so cool if you belong?
Sorry for the rant. Im just tired of seeing these stupid things running around with racks and lights driven by peole who never leave the city with "overlanding" stickers everywhere.
 

Mike W.

Well-known member
My best buddy of 50 years is an all in type guy..what ever is the new fad he's all in..he built his Tacoma full bore..Roof tent, all the right goodies from the solar panels to fuzzy dice and a ham sandwich. I mean radio .

His wife finally asked what the hell that thing on the top of his truck was.. Excited he popped the tent in his driveway..She laughed and told him toss the old tent In the back..No F'n way am I sleeping in your treehouse..

We overland today but for the last Three decades we just went camping..I cook over an open fire.. prefer my trips on horseback..my bears spray comes in 12 gauge slug form..but I did buy my boots at Eddie Bauer..does that count?

Oh and I carry gas cans on my roof rack..always more than I might need..
 

craig333

Expedition Leader
Running Sierra Trek I've run out of fuel on a trail that is only 13 or so miles long in my Jeep. I sit on top of ten gallons of gasoline. Two Jerry cans in the rear. I know its dangerous. Heck, the Jeep is dangerous. No doors, no anti lock brakes, no airbags, no shoulder belts etc. Its a risk I willingly take. Staying home isn't all that safe either.


Pretty sure I won't see these views from my car though.
 

lilkia

Active member
Running Sierra Trek I've run out of fuel on a trail that is only 13 or so miles long in my Jeep. I sit on top of ten gallons of gasoline. Two Jerry cans in the rear. I know its dangerous. Heck, the Jeep is dangerous. No doors, no anti lock brakes, no airbags, no shoulder belts etc. Its a risk I willingly take. Staying home isn't all that safe either.


Pretty sure I won't see these views from my car though.
Youre gonna shoot your eye out!
 

pluton

Adventurer
Im just tired of seeing these stupid things running around with racks and lights driven by peole who never leave the city with "overlanding" stickers everywhere.
Similar to the shiny, never-been-off-highway mall cruisers or faux monster trucks that teenagers love[ed?] so much.
 
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