Garmin Overlander

shade

Well-known member
LOL. I guess I've been lucky that I haven't found I couldn't stop and look at a map while under way. Or could be that I just don't trust myself not to cross lanes or go off the road bed so I much prefer to stop rather than fumble around with a device or map. I really am a pretty sub par driver, so I try to concentrate. It's also why I'm such a curmudgeon about not driving an automatic transmission. I find being engaged and not letting my mind wander is better for everyone.
LOL - It's really not that bad. With Gaia on a decent sized screen, it auto-scrolls. Once you have the screen zoomed to an appropriate level of detail, there's no need to touch it at all. I give it a glance while on a trail, but my main use for a big screen GPS is to see trail junctions for turns, or to see if I've managed to deviate from the trail. I found that useful when wandering around Death Valley, since the trail I was on was overgrown, and it was difficult to determine when I was supposed to be in a dry wash, and when I needed to get out of the creek bed.

If I want to examine a route more thoroughly, I still stop and check the screen. If I want a better view, out come the maps and guide books. Until we have cool screens on par with the ones from Red Planet, I don't think we'll be replacing printed maps.

Maybe that'll be the Garmin Overlander MkII.
 

kai38

Explorer
I was on the phone this morning with Garmin.
Finley spoke with a rep that had knowledge of the Overlander. Niklas at Product Support
Email from him:
Here are the steps I did to make this work. Please try it out and let me know if it works for you as well.

1. First, you need to convert your GPX file to a KML file.

1. Open BaseCamp
2. Select the route file you want to use on your Overlander
3. Click File > Export > Export Selection
4. A Windows File Explorer window will launch prompting you to save the file. Before you save the file, click the "Save as type" drop down and change it to KML 2.2 Document.
5. Click Save

That will save the KML file to your computer.

2. Next, you'll need to import the KML file into the Explore website.

1. Sign into the explore.garmin.com
2. Go to Map
3. Click the Import icon
4. Click Import GPX, KML, KMZ
5. Click Import As Tracks
6. Select a Collection option where you want the file saved
7. Drag and drop the KML file into the Import Data box, or click the box which will launch a File Explorer window where you can select the KML file.
8. Click Import.
Now, when you sync the Overlander your new track will be in your Explore app on the Overlander and should appear properly with the track going along the roads instead of straight direct-routing lines as the crow flies. To navigate this route on the Overlander, you'll go to the Explore App > Library > Tracks > Select the track > Tap the compass heading symbol > Tap Go!

I tested this by sending the KML file to my Overlander and it appears to have come through properly -- the route follows the roads just like it appears in BaseCamp. I also tested by importing the KML file as a "Route" in the Explore app, and while it did work, Routes are limited to 200 points, so Explore has to condense the route down which can result in route data being changed -- I would recommend sticking with the "Import as Track" option to make sure the track looks right.


I tried it and it looks like it works, best thing I will be able to use 10+ years of saved trip routes,tracks & waypoints which other Garmin service people have been telling me would be impossible to use with the new Overlander.
So I will test it locally and see how it works using .kml


UPDATE: Its still a POS
The route loaded I can see it on the Overlander, but when using the created route it routes me from my driveway right back into my driveway.
I can route waypoint to waypoint but on a multi day,week month long trip this is not something I want to be doing.
I'm going to sell it at a lose and use my NUVi

I talked to another CS person that sent me an even more complicated way to create and install routes what a huge PIA
 
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aardvarcus

Adventurer
After consideration of all options for off the beaten path navigation, I ended up ordering the Garmin Overlander. I really don’t think the price is too far out of line, especially since it is on sale right now (551.99, new, free shipping). Needing to replace an aging on-road GPS, not already owning a suitable cellular enabled tablet, and not wanting to spend a lot of extra time to download apps and maps pushed me in this direction. Time will tell how it performs.
 

1leglance

2007 Expedition Trophy Champion, Overland Certifie
I was on the phone this morning with Garmin.
Finley spoke with a rep that had knowledge of the Overlander. Niklas at Product Support
Email from him:
Here are the steps I did to make this work. Please try it out and let me know if it works for you as well.

1. First, you need to convert your GPX file to a KML file.

1. Open BaseCamp
2. Select the route file you want to use on your Overlander
3. Click File > Export > Export Selection
4. A Windows File Explorer window will launch prompting you to save the file. Before you save the file, click the "Save as type" drop down and change it to KML 2.2 Document.
5. Click Save

That will save the KML file to your computer.

2. Next, you'll need to import the KML file into the Explore website.

1. Sign into the explore.garmin.com
2. Go to Map
3. Click the Import icon
4. Click Import GPX, KML, KMZ
5. Click Import As Tracks
6. Select a Collection option where you want the file saved
7. Drag and drop the KML file into the Import Data box, or click the box which will launch a File Explorer window where you can select the KML file.
8. Click Import.
Now, when you sync the Overlander your new track will be in your Explore app on the Overlander and should appear properly with the track going along the roads instead of straight direct-routing lines as the crow flies. To navigate this route on the Overlander, you'll go to the Explore App > Library > Tracks > Select the track > Tap the compass heading symbol > Tap Go!

I tested this by sending the KML file to my Overlander and it appears to have come through properly -- the route follows the roads just like it appears in BaseCamp. I also tested by importing the KML file as a "Route" in the Explore app, and while it did work, Routes are limited to 200 points, so Explore has to condense the route down which can result in route data being changed -- I would recommend sticking with the "Import as Track" option to make sure the track looks right.


I tried it and it looks like it works, best thing I will be able to use 10+ years of saved trip routes,tracks & waypoints which other Garmin service people have been telling me would be impossible to use with the new Overlander.
So I will test it locally and see how it works using .kml

All this is great.....unless you need to transfer the data when OUT of cellular/wifi range.
Why these folks can't make it easy to swap data at a campsite with someone else is beyond me.
 

aardvarcus

Adventurer
Where did you find it for $552?
I don't know if we are supposed to say names of non-forum sponsors, but it was through a reseller at a major auction site stacking the $100 off from the reseller (599.99) with that aution site's rewards program (additional 8% or $48 off).
 

outdoornate65

Adventurer
Those are the very reasons I hate phones. Now I don't have space for a decent sized tablet, which changes things. But a phone or small tablet is too small to substitute for a map or atlas and really isn't supposed to. GPS tells you precisely where you are but is supposed to complement a map for context. Even a big tablet just isn't going to be as easy *for me* as folding out a Trails Illustrated or Gazetteer and laying a ruler out and marking it with a pencil.

I'm not about to unwrap my head and leave maps and compass at home so the pull to duplicate them isn't strong. The GPS in my outfit is as much about recording my track for use later as anything and for that a Garmin device is perfect. It's always recording your track and with it set to roll a new track daily it's one less thing I have to deal with.
I'm with you Brother. Guess I'm just old (school) but I like looking at a real map....before/during/after a trip. Heck I recently paid $$$ fora Baja Almanac we will rely on for an upcoming trip.
I have an Inreach for emergency comms and peace of mind but do not use it for routine navigation.

Nate (in Denver too)
 

Coachgeo

Explorer
I'm with you Brother. Guess I'm just old (school) but I like looking at a real map....before/during/after a trip. Heck I recently paid $$$ fora Baja Almanac we will rely on for an upcoming trip.
I have an Inreach for emergency comms and peace of mind but do not use it for routine navigation.

Nate (in Denver too)
look at dates of "real maps" inside a new atlas and you will discover that often they are decade(s) old. one of the advantages of digital is users ability to keep updating. Which begs to question..... what is the apps or software that allows for input by users so others can to take advantage of user reports?
 
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shade

Well-known member
look at dates of "real maps" inside a new atlas and you will discover that often they are decade(s) old. one of the advantages of digital is users ability to keep updating. Which begs to question..... what is the apps or software that allows for input by users so others can to take advantage of user reports?
For on-road usage, Google Maps makes real time requests about conditions. On a recent trip, I was regularly queried about the seat availability while using mass transit, and I believe a traffic jam while I was driving prompted a question about the unexpected delay.

For trails, I'm not sure if there are any map systems that make real time changes to the actual base map due to end user comments, but there are plenty of downloadable routes/trails that are offered by vendors. Those vendors add value by keeping those up to date, so a user could contact them about making changes.

Files from individuals can include whatever they want, but I don't think that's what you're after. Google Earth allows users to populate points of interest wherever, but again, that's not a change to a base map.
 

outdoornate65

Adventurer
look at dates of "real maps" inside a new atlas and you will discover that often they are decade(s) old. one of the advantages of digital is users ability to keep updating. Which begs to question..... what is the apps or software that allows for input by users so others can to take advantage of user reports?
Agree, the Baja almanac I purchased is the most recent addition from 2009. I use a ton of Nat Geo maps which seem top be pretty current/updated and they offer online updates as well.
 

moto-treks

On the road
iOverland POIs missing after update
I bought the Overlander the other day. After updating the software and maps I noticed the iOverland POIs did not exist. Unfortunately, I did not validate that iOverland POIs existed before updating. Garmin support told be to reload the maps. I tried that but Garmin Express failed. I returned/replaced the device and have not updated a thing and the iOverland POIs are available. I'm on Garmin software version 3.0 and North America map version NT 2020.10. Has anyone updated to the latest software and maps and still have access to the iOverland POIs?
 
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