FWC Shell or Habitat

czukie

Member
Hey overlanders! I need your pros and cons list to help me decide between a FWC Shell or a AT Habitat. Either one will be mounted on a stock 3rd gen Tacoma TRD Sport. My list is below with more important factors for me in italics

Habitat
Pros:
-Weight
-Year round efficiency (i.e. no storage needed)
-Lower profile

Cons:
-Bigger footprint
-Price to amenities ratio (would still have to build out interior)
-Soft top

FWC Shell
Pros:
-Hard top
-More "livable"
-Better price to efficiency ratio

Cons:
-Require airbags or suspension upgrade
-Storage needed when not in use
-Maintenance
 
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czukie

Member
Whats your main usage for it?
Usage will vary depending on which I purchase in a way. Mostly wanting a space with standing room to make longer camping trips easier, as well as having a refuge in case of inclement or colder weather.

Most likely the breakdown would be as follows:
70% will be used for trips longer than 2 weeks during the summer months
25% will be used for shorter trips (less than 10 days)
5% will be used for long weekends

I am a teacher who travels to climb during summer months, spring break, and winter break. Mostly looking for pros or cons I did not think of. Always looking for an outsiders perspective.
 

NH4Runner

New member
If you're currently running stock suspension on your Tacoma odds are you'd end up buying airbags for the Habitat too. Ultimately that depends upon whatever else you bring with you on these trips, as well as what you do to build out the interior. The airbags would also help stabilize the Habitat when it is open too.
 

czukie

Member
If you're currently running stock suspension on your Tacoma odds are you'd end up buying airbags for the Habitat too. Ultimately that depends upon whatever else you bring with you on these trips, as well as what you do to build out the interior. The airbags would also help stabilize the Habitat when it is open too.
Thanks for the input! I was planning on leaf springs if I choose the habitat. You’re saying I’d want more though?
 

aaldape

Observer
Funny that you posted this topic - I just had a similar situation and I think the biggest thing that helped me make a decision was getting to see both in person.

Yes, you’d have to “build out” the Habitat and make it more immediately livable, but there is plenty of space. The low weight is a big plus too.

I found the FWC shell to be a little small for my intentions, but found that having the entire truck bed to work with in the Habitat was a major plus.

Lots of balancing to play when making the decision, but if you can go see them in person (I went to a trade show) it made a huge difference.
 

VanIsle_Greg

I can change my custom title now!!
Good thread to follow.

I am currently looking for something like a Habitat or a FWC for my 1500 Ram. I have an offroad trailer I use with my Jeep XJ, but plan on selling both to fund a camper of some description for the pickup.

Pros for the camper, its a more complete out of the box solution than the Habitat, and probably a lot nicer in the colder weather. You do pay for that with the weight however.

I am really liking the Habitat for not only the weight, but for the simplicity. Less stuff to mess with and lots of room.

Following this...
 

Littlehouse

Adventurer
Might want to check out what Go Fast is doing as well....For a small truck, I would probably go with the lighter, at least I think so, Habitat between your choices.
 

Martyn

Supporting Sponsor, Overland Certified OC0018
If you're currently running stock suspension on your Tacoma odds are you'd end up buying airbags for the Habitat too. Ultimately that depends upon whatever else you bring with you on these trips, as well as what you do to build out the interior. The airbags would also help stabilize the Habitat when it is open too.
We have a whole range of Tacoma customers many with stock suspension, others with air bags, and some with modified suspension. In all cases the Habitat works with what they have.

As I think we all know the Tacoma stock rear suspension is weak and many people supplement it or replace it even if they are not usually carrying a load. We have also seen rear leafs that overtime work well with no load but fail with any load introduced.

So while working on the rear suspension demands some thought it’s not necessarily required for every Tacoma, but ultimately it will depend on usage and load.
 

Clutch

<---Pass

czukie

Member
Go fast is definitely on my radar, however, the things keeping me away from them right now are:
-biggest reason is lack of real life reviews from multiple people (or even a video walk through). They are doing an awesome job of marketing, but I would like to see more of the product with their filters and without professional photography

-I would like the bed set up to be more permanent and not have to create my bed every time. I understand that the habitat I will have to throw bedding and things up there as it does not **** with anything up there. But having to physically move parts around to create a bed every time seems like it would get old.

-Sealing from dust and moisture worries me (though I trust the guys at Hondo so maybe this point is moot)
 

Mtnjeep1

New member
Usage will vary depending on which I purchase in a way. Mostly wanting a space with standing room to make longer camping trips easier, as well as having a refuge in case of inclement or colder weather.

Most likely the breakdown would be as follows:
70% will be used for trips longer than 2 weeks during the summer months
25% will be used for shorter trips (less than 10 days)
5% will be used for long weekends

I am a teacher who travels to climb during summer months, spring break, and winter break. Mostly looking for pros or cons I did not think of. Always looking for an outsiders perspective.
I may be biased, but I think the FWC would be a better choice. I had a RTT for awhile, but I was over it after the first trip. I didn’t like spending as much time as I was setting up/ tearing down, tho the Habitat seems like it would be quick as well. I also like to carry surfboards/skis, and can leave them on my FWC (once I install my roof rack). The bed literally takes 2seconds to setup when ready to sleep. It does take up the whole truck bed unfortunately, but I take it off inbetween trips. Takes me 20min by myself. Its also really a comfortable setup to hang out in, and I can sleep in it with the top down on the couch for stealth camping or taking a nap between my work shifts. I have it on a 4cylinder Taco, and can still pull 20mpg on the interstate, 17+ in the mountains.
 

kmcintyre

Observer
I would add a spring regardless of the solution you use. You might contact Boise Spring Works and talk to them. The do a lot of springs for people with FWC/ATCs
Also, if you were to order a FWC shell, you can get a slightly higher roof model (might be an extra 6") if you are taller or feel the ceiling is too low.
 

Pax2525

Adventurer
I may be biased, but I think the FWC would be a better choice. I had a RTT for awhile, but I was over it after the first trip. I didn't like spending as much time as I was setting up/ tearing down, tho the Habitat seems like it would be quick as well. I also like to carry surfboards/skis, and can leave them on my FWC (once I install my roof rack). The bed literally takes 2seconds to setup when ready to sleep. It does take up the whole truck bed unfortunately, but I take it off inbetween trips. Takes me 20min by myself. Its also really a comfortable setup to hang out in, and I can sleep in it with the top down on the couch for stealth camping or taking a nap between my work shifts. I have it on a 4cylinder Taco, and can still pull 20mpg on the interstate, 17+ in the mountains.

Exactly what I was thinking on this topic. Was literally talking to someone about this 2 days ago. I think the 30 second set up is a big deal. Also I like the ease to get the camper on and off if you do need to transport something larger. Yes you may have to store it off usage but its also not bad driving full time especially if your opting for a shell model. Also maybe the #1 reason thats so underrated is the HEATER! Yes ideally you're traveling in nice weather but you won't have to.
 
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