FWC HAWK Flatbed on Tundra CrewMax, can it work?

vermonter4life

New member
Hey Gang.

I’m sure this has been tried/discussed, but I have searched all over the site and also lots of google searches too no avail.

Has anyone put a Four Wheel Camper flat bed onto a Toyota Tundra Crew Max? The week link of the crew max is the 5.5 foot bed. IMO the slide inFWC would have too small a floor our family of 3.

So how about pulling the bed off the crewmax and installing a 6 foot flatbed and then a Four Wheel Camper, Hawk.

The Hawks floor is 76 inches and weights 1300lbs dry.

https://fourwh.com/product/hawk-sho...amper-tray-ford-chevy-gmc-dodge-tundra-titan/


I don’t know what the difference +/- would be with removing the bed and putting on a flatbed tray.
My Tundra

5940lbs - weighed at scale.

GAWR:
Front: 4000lbs
Rear: 4150lbs

Total: 7200lbs

Has anyone done this? And if so how did it work?

Yes, I know stepping up to a ¾ ton crew cab and putting a flat bed on that would work with no question.
 

vermonter4life

New member
Yes, you are right but they have a flatbed camper on an extended cab tundra. That rig came with a 6 foot bed. The crewmax is another beast altogether. Its a huge crew cab but only has a 5.5 foot bed. That is the week link of the crew max. Im sure the payload is different between these two rigs but I can't speak with specifics. The 5.5 bed is a killer, hence the idea of pulling the bed, sticking a flatbed tray on it, that is 6 feet long and then the flatbed camper.

Has anyone done this?
 
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Rando

Explorer
I am sure it can be done, but it may not be a good idea, and it is a lot of money to spend on an imperfect solution. I have a Fleet flatbed on a Tacoma, and with this set up the center of gravity of the camper is about 8"-10" in front of the rear axel. Assuming the same distribution with a Hawk, and the extra weight of the flatbed sticking out an extra foot out the back, your center of gravity may end up significantly behind the rear axel. While not the end of the world, this is not good for handling and magnifies the weight on the rear axel. This diagram should help:


In addition to the technical issues, my worry would be that once you mate the camper/truck/flatbed you have essentially made an $70 -$90K 4wd camper as it would be hard to sell separately. I think you would find far fewer buyers for such a set up where the camper is obviously on the wrong truck.
 

fireball

Explorer
Toyota needs to start making the crewmax with a 6.5' bed. Until then, as much as I love Toyota and Tundras, it isn't the right tool for the job.

If I had more money than sense, I'd buy a new crewmax and send it to Utah to the www.stretchmytruck.com guys, for them to put a 8' bed extension on it. Then mount a Hawk flatbed and storage cubby behind the cab. That would be great, but would cost way more than a F250 which would handle the load much better.



My wife and 2 young kids and large dog do just fine with a standard slide in Hawk. The flatbed would be nicer for sure, but with just 3 of you I think you'll find a standard Hawk to do the job nicely.
 

Trikebubble

Adventurer
I've seen a couple people with Hawks on CM's. They just leave the tailgate on. I don't think it's an optimal combination at all, but I don't think the truck will implode.

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
 

Googlefish

New member
Looks like the new Tundra does now come with a 6.5’ bed with the CrewMax. Would this be preferred over the double cab 6.5‘ bed or would the CrewMax be too long?
 

slowtwitch

Adventurer
I wouldn't bother putting that kind of effort to get a Hawk with a fam of 3. That's what we are, and even the 6ft Hawk is small imo. You may think it's ok for a while, but then it wouldn't be.

Do it right, ditch the Tundra, get a 3/4 ton and 8 ft bed!
 

rruff

Explorer
The Hawks floor is 76 inches and weights 1300lbs dry.
Another member pointed out in another thread recently, that they weigh a lot more than they say they weigh. You'd think there'd be laws against this, but apparently not. I don't pay much attention to retail campers, but I know the XP V2 was a hell of a lot heavier than claimed as well. Tundras seem to hold up fine to being moderately overloaded, though.

I did a search and didn't find any examples of a flatbed Hawk on any truck with a 5.5' bed. As Rando mentioned it won't be ideal for weight distribution reasons. If you decide to go this route definitely use most of the back seat for heavy storage.
 
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