Fuel Storage at Home?

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
This is a topic I've been musing over for a while. Figured I'd see what others are doing.

How do you (safely) store all your fuels at home?

I'm a bit of a contradiction. My backyard workshop is like a Safety 101 video, I'm pretty sure I'm the only one in my neighborhood using an industrial fireproof cabinet to store all my volatile chemicals. That said, like any good weekend-warrior ExPo reader, I've got my collection of jerry cans, propane bottles, etc. I've been doing a... "mixed" job of keeping things out of dangerous storage locations. Propane bottles are stored covered and outside, but probably "too close" to the BBQ grill. My Jerry cans are probably also too close to an ignition source, etc. I'm probably doing better than most of my neighbors, at least one of whom has a rusty/leaky gas can for his lawn mower sitting next to a water heater in the garage...

I've decided to get serious about building a storage setup for all this stuff - both for convenient storage/retrieval, but also for safety. Most likely I'll just whip up a little wooden cabinet with a rack and a bunch of holes covered by mesh to vent any fumes and try to keep the spiders at bay, but I wanted to see what everyone else is doing. Anyone have a good solution? Or is everyone living dangerously? :D
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
Mine is stored in an aluminum cabinet bolted to the side of my shed. It has plenty of ventilation and it is lockable.
 

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Scoutman

Explorer
All my flammable fuels are stored in a 60 gallon fire safety cabinet on the covered back porch of my shop. Gasoline, diesel, propane, butane, lighter fluid, etc. One day I'd like to take the 20# propane tanks out and make a rack for them to free up some space but it hasn't been a huge priority.
 

jgaz

Adventurer
My fuel cans, generator, spare propane cylinder, torch tanks, and gasoline engine pressure washer are stored in this shed (about 10 feet from the house). Shed is well ventilated.

1993D514-3BB4-4E21-9F6A-7BBAAF4C3789.jpeg
My other flammables, mineral spirts, acetone, etc. are stored in a old metal filing cabinet also in this shed.
 
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Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
Nice jgaz. I need a 2nd shed. My current shed is really a workshop (filled with ignition sources, hence the fireproof cabinet for everything else). I'd love to have, like, a storage shed. :D
 

WOODY2

Adventurer
Nice jgaz. I need a 2nd shed. My current shed is really a workshop (filled with ignition sources, hence the fireproof cabinet for everything else). I'd love to have, like, a storage shed. :D
Hardyboard siding is relatively flame resistant if you build your own.
 

2.ooohhh

Member


Piles of mismatched Jerry cans fuel dump style. Probably should weld up a rack for them or something. I was in a stage where I was very interested in the slight differences between Specter, Wavian, and Valpro options.


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F350joe

Well-known member
I have some pipes that come out of the ground on the side of the house that make a great fuel can rack. Even has some sort of gauge to weight things. I think its broken, only seems to work when im doing laundry, which is so weird. I keep my ammo under that which is hidden with oily rags.
 

WRONG_WAY_DAVE

Active member
I have some pipes that come out of the ground on the side of the house that make a great fuel can rack. Even has some sort of gauge to weight things. I think its broken, only seems to work when im doing laundry, which is so weird. I keep my ammo under that which is hidden with oily rags.
--Let me guess, you have a gas dryer? ;)
 
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