Fuel Cans: Scepter or Valpro?

slvyj

Observer
The steel ones I’ve had good luck emptying and letting air out over a few days so I can ship them easily. Once the MFCs have held fuel they smell, it doesn’t seem to go away but I still like them. :)

My reserve is in a half dozen metal jerry cans, but I’ve been known to grab MFCs in Canada when they are on sale.


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That is good to know, thanks. I did ship over some used CARB compliant plastic cans with no problems but the regs can change at a moment's notice.

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shade

Well-known member
We used to be able to buy real Scepter MFC, both new and military surplus, but they are no longer legal to sell in the U.S. So the price for the now all used ones remaining has increased, about double now what they were ten years ago. I like Scepter cans but definitely not if they cost 3 times as much as steel cans. It would be an easy decision in that case.
On the third hand, it's a good excuse to come north to the Land of Scepter and buy some new ones. 🇨🇦
 

Wilbah

Adventurer
I was curious about this- has anyone had an issue bringing cans back into the states if purchased in Canada? Or are most just not declaring it?
 

jgaz

Adventurer
I was curious about this- has anyone had an issue bringing cans back into the states if purchased in Canada? Or are most just not declaring it?
I’ve done it twice.
Crossed back into the US once in Windsor and the second time in Sarnia.
Purchased the cans at Canadian Tire.

Note: Both times I had tools in the back of the truck since I was helping a cousin with a remodel job east of Toronto. Maybe this made a difference?
 

2.ooohhh

Member
I was curious about this- has anyone had an issue bringing cans back into the states if purchased in Canada? Or are most just not declaring it?
Bringing empty never filled cans as I understand it they can hold against you, as an attempt to import non conforming containers against EPA regs. I’ve always put fuel in mine when I buy them as I’ve been instructed that fuel containers holding fuel at the crossing are considered exempt. It’s likely no big deal most of the time but I pay very close attention to potential import/export violations so I don’t loose my trusted traveler status.


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Wilbah

Adventurer
Bringing empty never filled cans as I understand it they can hold against you, as an attempt to import non conforming containers against EPA regs. I’ve always put fuel in mine when I buy them as I’ve been instructed that fuel containers holding fuel at the crossing are considered exempt. It’s likely no big deal most of the time but I pay very close attention to potential import/export violations so I don’t loose my trusted traveler status.


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I just read the duty regs from Customs and if you were in Canada for more than 48 hours you could bring back $800 worth of items "duty free". (If you were there less than 48 hours the duty free amount drops to $200.) So with the exchange rate now and cost at Princess Tire (+/- $60 USD/can) that would be about 12-13 cans. And for that amount, especially if coupled to a trip, you could claim those were for personal storage etc. But it might be a way to do it if you had a trip planned for a few days.
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
Yep, Feds adoped CARB standards and retarded fuel can nozzles about a decade ago. IMporting or selling unmolested Scepter MFC is now verboten. Thus the ridiculous high prices for USED and the feeding frenzy when good quality metal "not for fuel" NATO-spec MFCs are put up for sale.
 

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Wilbah

Adventurer
Is that per person ?
Sounds like a family Canada trip could be profitable. Safer than smuggling cigarettes anyway...
If I read this correct it is per person.

 

2.ooohhh

Member
I just read the duty regs from Customs and if you were in Canada for more than 48 hours you could bring back $800 worth of items "duty free". (If you were there less than 48 hours the duty free amount drops to $200.) So with the exchange rate now and cost at Princess Tire (+/- $60 USD/can) that would be about 12-13 cans. And for that amount, especially if coupled to a trip, you could claim those were for personal storage etc. But it might be a way to do it if you had a trip planned for a few days.
It’s not about paying duty on the fuel or the cans, that bit is rather cut and dry. It is illegal to IMPORT, manufacture, or sell, non-CARB compliant fuel cans(PFCs) since 2009.

The law has an exemption for personal use.

If you import empty, and new cans, especially large quantities of them it’s harder to defend a personal use claim.

If you have a couple cans containing fuel, like a traveler might carry as spare fuel defending personal use is a non issue.


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Trikebubble

Adventurer
I love my Scepter MFC's. They seem bombproof, I'm pretty sure I could drive over one without harming it. They see 45* Celcius down to -20* Celcius without any complaining at all. I love the internal vent thru the handle, it allows them to fully empty in what seems like seconds. The long flexible nozzle and spanner are both a necessity. It's one of the itmes when living here in Canada doesn't cost 10 times more to procure something of quality.
 
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