Fuel Cans: Scepter or Valpro?

slvyj

Observer
I'm station in Europe for the next few years and one advantage is I can get Scepter Fuel cans for about $65 or Valpro steel cans for $20. What should I get? I will need four. If I buy the Scepter, which fuel nozzle should I get for gasoline? Either the 1 1/8 high flow or the 3/4. Thanks
 

shade

Well-known member
I'm station in Europe for the next few years and one advantage is I can get Scepter Fuel cans for about $65 or Valpro steel cans for $20. What should I get? I will need four. If I buy the Scepter, which fuel nozzle should I get for gasoline? Either the 1 1/8 high flow or the 3/4. Thanks
If you're planning on eventually shipping them somewhere, you may want to check on requirements. Once used, it can be difficult to ship a fuel can.

I haven't heard of Valpro, but I prefer Scepter MFCs to metal for the improved durability and lack of corrosion issues.
 

slvyj

Observer
If you're planning on eventually shipping them somewhere, you may want to check on requirements. Once used, it can be difficult to ship a fuel can.

I haven't heard of Valpro, but I prefer Scepter MFCs to metal for the improved durability and lack of corrosion issues.
Valpro is a jerry can manufacturer in Latvia. I believe the are the supplier for the big names like Wavian or British Atlantic.



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krick3tt

Adventurer
I have had NATO cans for over twenty years and they show no signs of corrosion. I suppose if you want them to last for fifty years there might be some indication of corrosion but really who is going to pass them on to their heirs?
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
If you're planning on eventually shipping them somewhere, you may want to check on requirements. Once used, it can be difficult to ship a fuel can.

I haven't heard of Valpro, but I prefer Scepter MFCs to metal for the improved durability and lack of corrosion issues.
I think ValPro is the actual manufacturer for Wavian (e.g. I believe the real deal contract supplier) NATO cans, so either Scepter or ValPro would be of similar quality, e.g. actual military fuel cans.

The question is whether your preference is for steel or plastic. I converted completely to Scepter MFCs and wouldn't go back to steel personally but my only comparison are Blitz cans (pre-CARB), which work fine but rusted. Pretty sure real Rezol-lined NATO steel cans would last plenty long.

If I could get brand new genuine NATO steel cans, I dunno, hard to say I wouldn't go that way.

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shade

Well-known member
I have had NATO cans for over twenty years and they show no signs of corrosion. I suppose if you want them to last for fifty years there might be some indication of corrosion but really who is going to pass them on to their heirs?
Plastic won't rust, and can handle impacts better than steel, but there's nothing wrong with either choice when it comes to the best examples. A big knock against the MFC is availability in the U.S. If you can find a new one, it's going to be expensive. If you buy used, there's probably a reason it's being sold.
 

Kmrtnsn

Explorer
Scepter cans, without a doubt the most durable fuel cans I've eve used. Trying throwing a metal fuel can 25 feet to the ground out of a helicopter.
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
$68 must be European VAT inflation. Damned ridiculous price for a buck's worth of plastic. I hope you intend to ship them home with personal / household goods, unused. I don't think you'll have any luck shipping them home on their own, due to importation regs in effect in the States. 'No non-CARB cans / jugs for you!', say the eco-nazis.
You could pay that same price here in the States for illicitly shipped Canada-sourced Scepter MFCs.

But since you are in the service you might be able to arrange a 'deal deal' and get some Logistics guys to wrangle some shiny new MFCs at cost.

btw, Scepter's 'civilian' variant gas jugs with crappy CARB nozzles are about $24, widely available in the states, look and work very much like the MFCs, albeit with a fatter 'anti-tip' bottom that won't work in milspec MFC carriers and are about 2/3 the thickness of a proper MFC and still vastly more thick and sturdy than other plastic jugs on the market. If you aren't locked into the MILSPEC footprint, they're fine containers. Especially for the much lower price.
 

slvyj

Observer
I think ValPro is the actual manufacturer for Wavian (e.g. I believe the real deal contract supplier) NATO cans, so either Scepter or ValPro would be of similar quality, e.g. actual military fuel cans.

The question is whether your preference is for steel or plastic. I converted completely to Scepter MFCs and wouldn't go back to steel personally but my only comparison are Blitz cans (pre-CARB), which work fine but rusted. Pretty sure real Rezol-lined NATO steel cans would last plenty long.

If I could get brand new genuine NATO steel cans, I dunno, hard to say I wouldn't go that way.

View attachment 544495
My thought is I can buy three steel cans for the price of the scepter. On the other hand, a search of ebay and this forum, most appear to be paying $50-60 for USED scepters. I don't see anyone buying brand new scepters in the States for $63. Canada prices is $52 plus shipping.
 

Airmapper

High-Tech Redneck
I would get some of each, both metal and plastic have their place.

For around the vehicle use, I like plastic. Truck beds, trailer beds, and roof racks are usually metal, and plastic on metal tends to be easier to deal with. Less noise, less hassle securing them as there is at least some friction between the materials, also less chance of scratching paint if you bump into the vehicle.

For long term fuel storage, I'd go metal. No matter the quality of plastic, fuel will seep into it over time and it may not hurt it, but will discolor it and very very slowly seep out.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
My thought is I can buy three steel cans for the price of the scepter. On the other hand, a search of ebay and this forum, most appear to be paying $50-60 for USED scepters. I don't see anyone buying brand new scepters in the States for $63. Canada prices is $52 plus shipping.
We used to be able to buy real Scepter MFC, both new and military surplus, but they are no longer legal to sell in the U.S. So the price for the now all used ones remaining has increased, about double now what they were ten years ago. I like Scepter cans but definitely not if they cost 3 times as much as steel cans. It would be an easy decision in that case.
 

2.ooohhh

Member
The steel ones I’ve had good luck emptying and letting air out over a few days so I can ship them easily. Once the MFCs have held fuel they smell, it doesn’t seem to go away but I still like them. :)

My reserve is in a half dozen metal jerry cans, but I’ve been known to grab MFCs in Canada when they are on sale.


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