Front diff diff.

GR8ADV

Explorer
Is there any difference between the limited slip offered by Allen, ATW, and EC? Thanks all
 

whatcharterboat

Supporting Sponsor, Overland Certified OC0018
Is there any difference between the limited slip offered by Allen, ATW, and EC? Thanks all
Hi Ken,

ATW diff is made in the UK by a long established motorsport company. Very high quality steel and machining. The same guys make components for military and F1 so QA is first rate.

Regards John.
 

Aussie Iron

Explorer
I've fitted one supplied by Alan, very happy with the way it works and can't complain about the workmanship that I saw in it before it was fitted. I believe they are pretty much all the same animal being all ATB. The ones supplied by Alan have a spring loaded centre so are self engaging and I believe the ATW ones you need to apply a little brake pressure to get them to engage. EC could be using Alans.

Dan.
 

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SkiFreak

Expedition Leader
The only other ATB diff centre that I know of for the Fuso/Isuzu is the one supplied by Kym Bolton, but his was considerably more expensive that either Alan's or ATW's.
 

alan

Explorer
Is there any difference between the limited slip offered by Allen, ATW, and EC? Thanks all
Our Outback LSD is made in Taiwan by a motorsport company, as many engineers will tell you Taiwan make the best cnc gear cutting machines in the world!
 

GR8ADV

Explorer
Ok other than where or who makes them, what are the operational/functional differences? Why would I buy one over the other. Thanks.
 
Last edited:

SkiFreak

Expedition Leader
Why would I buy one over the other.
So, to address your direct question...
All of the three businesses that offer these ATB (auto torque biasing) differentials for Fuso/Isuzu trucks use the same basic Torsen style design. As to which is "best", well, that is technically difficult to say.
As has been mentioned, there are slight functionality differences between these units. My understanding is that Alan's diff has a spring loading setup which will auto engage the diff if one wheel was getting no traction at all (off the ground etc.) whereas the others will require a bit of brake pedal force to do the same thing.

Given that these are high load related devices, the quality of the material they are made from and the tolerance of the individual parts is probably key here, but unless you had all three available for testing, finding out that information would probably be challenging. Unless someone were to do a technical and/or destructive test of all three, which I am pretty sure has not been done (well, not publicly at least) it would be virtually impossible to know which is actually made better and which will perform best and last the longest.
Every manufacturer will probably say that what they sell is the best; why wouldn't they?

Sadly, the only thing that you can really do (at this time) is to base your purchasing choice on the feedback users have given with the different versions. Find out, if you can, if there have been any failures. I would also check the warranty situation with each type, so you know what will happen if there is a problem with the diff months or years down the track.
 

GR8ADV

Explorer
I love it when I have new stuff to learn. I did not think ATB AND THE TORSEN systems were the same. Not sure about this idea of tapping the brakes. I never had to do that on my ATB quaife and according to the video it is not required on the TORSEN. Much to learn apparently.
 

alan

Explorer
I love it when I have new stuff to learn. I did not think ATB AND THE TORSEN systems were the same. Not sure about this idea of tapping the brakes. I never had to do that on my ATB quaife and according to the video it is not required on the TORSEN. Much to learn apparently.
You can clearly see in Dan's video from Cape York the LSD in action, one wheel is spinning in the soft sand and you can see the LSD feeding drive to the lh wheel on the hard ground.
 

SkiFreak

Expedition Leader
I did not think ATB AND THE TORSEN systems were the same.
Definitely not identical, but they are both torque biasing differentials.


Not sure about this idea of tapping the brakes. I never had to do that on my ATB quaife and according to the video it is not required on the TORSEN.
The ATW ATB diff is made by Quaife.
I do not have one myself, but have been informed that you do need to tap the brakes if you have no contact with one wheel. I may be wrong.
 

yabanja

Explorer
I have a torsen in my spec miata race car which works very well. I had never learned how it worked. Decided to look it up:

 

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GR8ADV

Explorer
Definitely not identical, but they are both torque biasing differentials.




The ATW ATB diff is made by Quaife.
I do not have one myself, but have been informed that you do need to tap the brakes if you have no contact with one wheel. I may be wrong.
I had a quaife in my race car back in the day. It was flawless.
 

GR8ADV

Explorer
I love it when I have new stuff to learn. I did not think ATB AND THE TORSEN systems were the same. Not sure about this idea of tapping the brakes. I never had to do that on my ATB quaife and according to the video it is not required on the TORSEN. Much to learn apparently.
Ok, so as I ever so slowly get smarter, it appears that both the Quaife and the Torsen LSD's are best suited for on road use. They do not bias enough of the torque to deal with one wheel off the ground or spinning freely to be effective. Hence the concept of having to apply the brakes to get them to function. Starting to make sense.
 
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