Freightliner ambulance conversion project.

nick disjunkt

Adventurer
It'll probably be the OM906la that's I've got in my truck. Let me know if you need any advice on it. It's not a particularly exciting engine but it's reliable and smooth running and service intervals are huge if you use good oils.
 

rlrenz

Explorer
It is a Medic Master and it is a Mercedes. Uncharted territory for me. I definitely would of preferred a Cummings or even a Cat. But the rest of the rig (except no pass through) was a good fit for us.

One other issue is that all the controls are digital and software driven. Makes it a bit harder to repurpose the circuits (imagine sticky labels on the touch screen ).[/QUOTE

Since Medic Master closed down in 2008. their ambulances are orphans, and the users want to trade to something that has factory support, which equals a lower price. The good news is that Medic Master was owned by American LaFrance, which was part of Freightliner. As a result, their builds are very well done. If you got the Medic Master owner's manual with it, you'll see a tremendous difference compared to other builders.

The possible GOTTCHA out there is their digital control system. It is still around as the VMUX system, and is manufactured by Weldon and used by multiple ambulance manufacturers. Components for it show up on EBAY from time to time. Foster Coach (www.fostercoach.com) usually has components available used that were left over from a remount. Unfortunately, though - prices are usually high.

The programming can not be changed in the field unless you have the correct programmer - it might require that the control head be sent into Weldon if changes are needed. Since doing this would shut down an in-service ambulance until it could be turned around by Weldon, you can still buy an ambulance with conventional relay/diode logic since they can be diagnosed with a DMM or a test light.

A bit of good news is that I have a Medic Master manual that covers a unit the VMUX system. I'll pull out the operating instructions for the VMUX system and email them to you.

Since Medic Master was built for many years in Sanford,FL, ambulance dealers near Sanford might be able to help you with any problems. Try to figure out who the previous owner was, and contact them to see if they still have the manual. Offer payment/bribes/donations to the VFD - whatever. Plan B is to try to identify the dealer who sold the unit - they may have a manual in their files. If all else fails, talk to "10-8 Company". They are in Sanford, and have some of the old Medic Master folks working for them.

Again, if all else fails, my copy wouldn't be specific to your ambulance, but we could scan the pages and they would be better than you have now (zero---). Medic Master probably used the same approach on all their ambulances, and the documentation should be pretty close.

Happy Trails!
 

gunner

New member
i worked on those on my previous assignment, caterpillar acert engine, Allison transmission, abs brakes. they drive really nice, i was able to recover 20+tons vehicles without any issues and able to drive 45 mph on freeway
 

rlrenz

Explorer
i worked on those on my previous assignment, caterpillar acert engine, Allison transmission, abs brakes. they drive really nice, i was able to recover 20+tons vehicles without any issues and able to drive 45 mph on freeway
We moved dead M60-A3 tanks with one of them very easily - I've also seen photos of one driving through mud up to the windshield (I'll bet that cleaning the mud off either took a few days with a hose, or a driving through a pond for a while). You don't even want to think about the cost of the tires, though -
 

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gunner

New member
We moved dead M60-A3 tanks with one of them very easily - I've also seen photos of one driving through mud up to the windshield (I'll bet that cleaning the mud off either took a few days with a hose, or a driving through a pond for a while). You don't even want to think about the cost of the tires, though -
You are right, cost of the maintenance is very high on these trucks.I used to maintain these trucks for an Infatry Battalion,they are A4 ,instead of A2 probably you had with detroit diesel. the cost of their maintanence is crazy, like engine take approximately 13 gallons of oil, each axle take 11 gallons, transmission 17 gallons, service kit ( filters ,some bolts,seals) needs to be caterpillar parts to maintain the warranty.
new Hemmt A4 drives great, but i cant afford to drive or maintain that truck.
 

Ozrockrat

Expedition Leader
Ouch that was Snowverland Expo West. Cold, wet, windy, snow and sleet and that was only during the class I was running. Great times but I was sure glad I wasn't on a bike or in a roof top tent (better than a tent I suppose). We stayed warm and dry inside but getting around was a whole lot of fun.
 

Ozrockrat

Expedition Leader
After all these years of calling it "Old Yella" I had some guys swing by and polish the rig the other day. Turns out it is more green than yellow.

IMG_9378.jpg IMG_9375.jpg
 

patoz

Expedition Leader
The official term used in Emergency Services is 'Lime Green'. It's supposed to be more visible than the traditional red or white, but we all hate it.

It actually turned out looking pretty good!
 

rlrenz

Explorer
I'm guessing that "Ol' Yella/Greenie" will be rolling down the road to a new owner after you build up "Big Red"? Or are you planning to start an ambulance collection?

Regardless, a bit of polish does make it look a lot nicer.
 
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