Ford F700 Build

shortbus4x4

Expedition Leader
It will be much much easier to move the axle on the frame versus moving the wheel wells on the box. If you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself talk to a truck shop or mobile truck guy. It is pretty common to do this on commercial trucks. If you don't want or can't move the truck right now because of the box see if the truck shop will let their best mechanic come do it on their time or his. Just make sure he has done it before and knows what he is doing, don't get some guy who just started and this is his first job.

You could go with a bigger box but if you are happy with what you have then run with it. There is something to be said for putting a light load on a HD chassis when you are running rough roads far away from parts and mechanics. My grandfather built a custom camper in the early 70's using a 27' Winnebago fifth wheel trailer and a 1970 Ford 700 Cabover chassis. He took the axles out of the trailer, jacked it up and backed the truck under it. He then extended the rear frame, moved the rear axle and bolted the two together. It was a double frame motorhome. He ran singles in the rear and modified the rear springs due to it being lighter than what the truck was built for. He drove the Alaska Hiway 16 years in a row with it and didn't have any serious issues. I think he put 270k on it before he sold it too me when he couldn't drive it anymore in 2005. The first motorhome he drove up in the late 60's was a stick and staple on a IHC chassis. It broke the front springs on the way up and he had to junk it when he got back due to the body coming apart. He was very disgusted with it so he built his own that would last.
 

bajajoaquin

Adventurer
My grandfather built a custom camper in the early 70's using a 27' Winnebago fifth wheel trailer and a 1970 Ford 700 Cabover chassis. He took the axles out of the trailer, jacked it up and backed the truck under it. He then extended the rear frame, moved the rear axle and bolted the two together. It was a double frame motorhome. He ran singles in the rear and modified the rear springs due to it being lighter than what the truck was built for. He drove the Alaska Hiway 16 years in a row with it and didn't have any serious issues. I think he put 270k on it before he sold it too me when he couldn't drive it anymore in 2005.
I don't believe it. Without pics, it didn't exist!

:)
 

shortbus4x4

Expedition Leader
I don't have pictures of it being built because it was made before I was around but it is sitting in my driveway and I will take some pictures this week. My grandparents wintered in Arizona and mined gold every summer in Alaska for close to twenty years, late 60's to mid 80's. He told me he could almost make it from Phoenix AZ to Fairbanks AK without stopping for fuel. He tried it once and ran out about 40 miles before Fairbanks, I think it holds 400 gallons of diesel in about 4-6 different tanks. It has a CAT 1145 V-8 with a five speed and two speed rear, I think he told me he could get about 12mpg from it. I bought it from my grandparents and never used it so I traded it to a older gentleman and his wife in exchange for him painting my house. I need to put injectors in it and then it is leaving me.:( Oh well at least it will get used. By the time I have free time to use it I am sure it will have rusted/rotted away.
 

hdemetrious

Adventurer
I'm thinking of boxing the gap in and making it the bathroom. It will be the shower on one side and the tiolet on the other all the while allowing for a cab to cabin connection.
 

shortbus4x4

Expedition Leader
I'm thinking of boxing the gap in and making it the bathroom. It will be the shower on one side and the tiolet on the other all the while allowing for a cab to cabin connection.
That is an excellent idea. You could actually put the black water and grey water tanks right under the facilities that way on the outside of the frame with minimal plumbing involved.
 

alaskaboy

Observer
What? Where did the box was non-negotiable go?

In any event, I think your now thinking outside the "box". Ha Ha! A HiLo would be a tremendous upgrade in terms of livability and space utilization. I do believe that they are liquidating and you might find a deal. The crawl thru might really be a crawlthru, if even possible.
 

T.Low

Expedition Leader
Again, it would not add up. Why have to deal with the compromises of a truck that big and still have to deal with the compromises of a high-low also?

You put up with a big truck so you can have a big convienent living space.
 

alaskaboy

Observer
A 21 foot trailer is pretty big for living space. Convenient, maybe not so much in a HiLo. Hde would gain significant vertical clearence and CG with the HiLo, obviously, over a conventional trailer just stacked onto the truck frame. A custom cabin would be slightly lower if you did not have to deal with a trailer ready chassis in place. It might be worth the trade off based on where he plans to go. A "lift" switch on the dash to pop it up just as your parking might not really delay any ingress/egress.

Life is series of compromisses, unfortunately.
 

hdemetrious

Adventurer
I need to enclose the 21" gap between the box and the cab. It looks like it will be pricey to weld an aluminium extension. I am thinking of creating a fiberglass extension. I know how to work with fiberglass. What do you guys think?
 

spencyg

This Space For Rent
If done right, I think cored fiberglass (i.e. build it out of plywood, and then encapsulate with thick 'glass) would be quite sufficient and easy to accomplish.
 

hdemetrious

Adventurer
Aluminum Boxes

I want to install aluminum boxes for gear storage which will mount under the box in front of the rear wheels. They will be higher than the transfer case. There will be about 14" from the ground to the bottom of the box. They are five feet long so they will cover from the rear wheels to the start of the box. Is there a problem with this?
 
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