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Fly fishing question

mep1811

Gentleman Adventurer
I have a old Fenwick backpacking fly rod (7ft) rated for 6 weight. I would like to use it on small streams/ brooks. Should I use 6 weight line or go to a lighter line? Or is my tippet size more of a factor depending on the fly I'm using?


Thanks
 

PJorgen

Desert Dweller
Depends, will you be fishing dries or nymphs? If you're fishing nymphs, use a weight-forward 6wt line and just plop them out there. Not my idea of real fly fishing but a lot of people do it and catch fish.

If you want to cast dry flies, it will be a bit of a challenge with a 6wt on small water. For shorter casts you won't be able to get enough line out to properly load the rod. I prefer double-taper lines but in your case a weight-forward line will help load the rod but it will be difficult to make delicate presentations. Shorter leader and tippet combination will allow you to get more line out but again, not very delicate presentations.

For small water you'd be better off with a 3 or 4 wt rod.
 

mep1811

Gentleman Adventurer
Thanks . For the time of year I'll be either be nymphing or fishing terrestrials. There are some waters where the only things that work are nymphs or dries during a hatch.
I'll be fishing some small streams in the Big Horns and Big Horn river and up to Montana.
 

LaBalaDePlata

New member
I agree with what PJorgen said above. If you're going to stick with the rod you have, I would not go to a lighter line for what your rod is rated for, ever. If you're going to get a new rod (which I would if I were making the trip from El Chuco to Montana) then I'd get a 3 or 4wt rod and use your 6wt for streamers. 7ft rods are not ideal for fishing big rivers but sometimes you gotta use what you got.
 
If it were me, I’d go with a 7-7 1/2‘ 4wt on small waters. Your 6wt will work, but it’s going to be pretty stiff. You’ll have more fun with the lighter rod.

For bigger waters, I prefer a 9’ up to 10 1/2‘ rod with weight matched to the typical size of fish you’re targeting. A 7wt is typically the biggest rod I use. Most are in the 4-6wt range.
 

LocoCoyote

World Citizen
A bit off topic, but I love reading you good folk discussing some technicalities of fly fishing…makes me want to learn it all the more. Seems like the best and most fun way to fish.
 
A bit off topic, but I love reading you good folk discussing some technicalities of fly fishing…makes me want to learn it all the more. Seems like the best and most fun way to fish.
Don’t let the elitists make it seem hard, it “ain’t“. Pick up a copy of The Curtis Creek Manifesto, by Sheridan Anderson. It’s a well written cartoon style book that tells you every thing you need to know to get started, maybe $15 these days (I bought my copy in 1978). Visit a local fly shop and get a starter kit. Let them know what you want to catch, and what flies are effective in that area.

Ask about fly fishing clubs, the ones I’ve belonged to were very helpful with beginning fly fishers, they also are conservation minded, so you can get a chance to help the fish.
 

LocoCoyote

World Citizen
Don’t let the elitists make it seem hard, it “ain’t“. Pick up a copy of The Curtis Creek Manifesto, by Sheridan Anderson. It’s a well written cartoon style book that tells you every thing you need to know to get started, maybe $15 these days (I bought my copy in 1978). Visit a local fly shop and get a starter kit. Let them know what you want to catch, and what flies are effective in that area.

Ask about fly fishing clubs, the ones I’ve belonged to were very helpful with beginning fly fishers, they also are conservation minded, so you can get a chance to help the fish.
Very nice, thank you.


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The_Squid

New member
I agree with everything above. A 6wt is a good ‘all-around’ rod that you can do just about anything with. But if you don’t mind shelling out a few dollars, I think you would get more enjoyment out of a lighter rod (4wt or even a 3wt if the fish aren’t very big).
 

chaosinwest

New member
The 6wt is pretty robust for small streams. But, you should fish with what you got so I would stick with a 6 wt line. On small streams, leader size and tippet size are usually more important because you won't have much of the fly line out of the tip of your rod. Just for an idea, a 5 wt in Colorado is pretty common for everywhere until you get to small mountain streams. Then, a 7 foot, 3 wt works awesome.
 

Todd n Natalie

Observer
A bit off topic, but I love reading you good folk discussing some technicalities of fly fishing…makes me want to learn it all the more. Seems like the best and most fun way to fish.
Don’t let the elitists make it seem hard, it “ain’t“. Pick up a copy of The Curtis Creek Manifesto, by Sheridan Anderson. It’s a well written cartoon style book that tells you every thing you need to know to get started, maybe $15 these days (I bought my copy in 1978). Visit a local fly shop and get a starter kit. Let them know what you want to catch, and what flies are effective in that area.

Ask about fly fishing clubs, the ones I’ve belonged to were very helpful with beginning fly fishers, they also are conservation minded, so you can get a chance to help the fish.
Agreed. This is pretty interesting and make me want to learn. Probably better than the Denny Crane approach to fly fishing...


 
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