Flatbed and composite panel build on Dodge 2500

OutbacKamper

Supporting Sponsor
Thanks for the link. I have inquired with a couple different manufactures. Some make limited sizes, some only make the honey comb panel. Personally I would prefer
the sandwiched foam panels. Andreas seems to have the total package. He even has a method so the walls can support items such as spare tires,
racks, etc. This is also important for attaching interior cabinetry. As a DIY , I need to keep it as simple as possible:) But I sure wish I had Mark's toys..
Here is some info Andreas shared with me;

Extruded Polystyrene (blue foam)(XPS) has an R Value of 5-5.4 per 1" thickness

Polyurethane (yellow foam)(PU) has an R value of 6 per 1" thickness. Compare to the XPS it will break down sooner (15-20 years) but can handle chemicals better (like polyester resin)

PP Honeycomb has an R value of ~ 2.5- 3.5 per 1" thickness

You may get away with the honeycomb panels for 3 season camping but when hitting sub freezing temperatures your heater will run a lot more often or you will even get condensation inside the cabin.

As for the weight differences: Honeycomb is about 10-15% heavier but more rigid. (can handle impacts better)

At the end it comes down to your preference and the intended use. But I always mention that 99% of all the expedition trucks are constructed with PU or XPS. I only came across the honeycomb here in North America as a building material.
You can also get the honeycomb panels injected with foam, which gives you the rigidity of of honeycomb with the R value of 5-7 per inch depending on foam type.
 

Jeep

Supporting Sponsor: Overland Explorer Expedition V
You can also get the honeycomb panels injected with foam, which gives you the rigidity of of honeycomb with the R value of 5-7 per inch depending on foam type.
I built a custom trailer with a set of panels, honeycomb core, foam filled, glass skins. When we cut the door plug out we checked the panel construction out pretty closely, and we ripped the skins off by hand....needless to say we don't use that manufacturer. It's too bad because conceptually it would be the ultimate panel.
 

Jeep

Supporting Sponsor: Overland Explorer Expedition V
Umm, more like 1980sMercedes. :)
1943 GPW
1957 CJ-3B high hood (still have it)
1963 Willys FC 150
1966 CJ-6
1974 CJ-5
1980 CJ-7
1994 YJ
1995 YJ DD
1995 YJ kinda
1995 YJ tub, Scrambler top, FJ45 style box....this was long before the Brute
1997 TJ DD
1998 TJ
2000 TJ DD
1998 TJ (latest Cummins powered Jeep now sold)


1982 Toyota 4x4 P/U
1974 FJ-40 Land Cruiser
2005 Tundra
2007 Tacoma

Jeep (I might say the original expedition vehicle) wins, but I've liked every Toyota I've owned too!
 

mk216v

Der Chef der Fahrzeuge
I think Dzl was commenting how a Toyota is better built than a Jeep, so since your cabins are better built than others, your name should be more synonymous with good build quality. ;)
 

Jeep

Supporting Sponsor: Overland Explorer Expedition V
I think Dzl was commenting how a Toyota is better built than a Jeep, so since your cabins are better built than others, your name should be more synonymous with good build quality. ;)
But you've never had a Jeep I built :)
 

Jeep

Supporting Sponsor: Overland Explorer Expedition V
The $2500 piano hinge

I was hating the fact that a fold up bunk was going to block my window, and that the top of my head has enough scars from the top of your typical 6' tall RV door, so I really didn't want something else to add to that fun stuff. Linear guides mounted to an aluminum plate, spaced to match the extrusion with a nice adhesive gap. The mounting plate was cnc cut and acted as the pattern to punch the holes in the shower wall. Cycles nice and fast, smooth, goes up 24" in 25 seconds. A couple of positive rests will go on so the weight is off the actuators in use, and a safety switch to keep big brother from squishing little sister.

Bunk 3.jpg

Bunk 5.jpg

Bunk 6.jpg

Bunk 4.jpg

Bunk 7.jpg

Bunk 1.jpg

Bunk 2.jpg
 

Jeep

Supporting Sponsor: Overland Explorer Expedition V
Unrelated but a cool project

Doing another media truck for an adventure show. ROPS/rack will hold spare tire, lighting, kayaks, snow boards, surf boards, and fix 3 dirt bikes in place. Ladder on both sides to access the top without crawling over the bed sides.

Forbes 1.jpg

Forbes 2.jpg
 

Healeyjet

Explorer
Excellent solution to a problem Mark!! Looks very strong. The cost sucks but you will enjoy it every time you hit the actuator switch!

Ward
 

mk216v

Der Chef der Fahrzeuge
Sweet stuff, gorgeous shop! Looks like no one works in there. ;-)

Any shots of the bunks fully deployed?
 

S2DM

Adventurer
I was hating the fact that a fold up bunk was going to block my window, and that the top of my head has enough scars from the top of your typical 6' tall RV door, so I really didn't want something else to add to that fun stuff. Linear guides mounted to an aluminum plate, spaced to match the extrusion with a nice adhesive gap. The mounting plate was cnc cut and acted as the pattern to punch the holes in the shower wall. Cycles nice and fast, smooth, goes up 24" in 25 seconds. A couple of positive rests will go on so the weight is off the actuators in use, and a safety switch to keep big brother from squishing little sister.
I'd been investigating something similar from motion control, as well as uhmw polyethyelene based guides from 80/20 and a few others. Wondering how it seems to you from a binding standpoint? Probably way less of an issue with CNC precision and dead square installation as in your build. Curious how much slop/movement is present in the carriage bearing unit?
Was looking for something to control side to side motion and center my box as it articulated. My walls have some flex and wanted to find something to set the distance between the walls and keep it constant. Been using sliders, but they arent great for that, so I'm interested in a track and bearing carriage or uhmw based carriage for a couple reasons.
 

Jeep

Supporting Sponsor: Overland Explorer Expedition V
Sweet stuff, gorgeous shop! Looks like no one works in there. ;-)

Any shots of the bunks fully deployed?
Sometimes by the time I get into the shop everybody is gone home! That's the way every shop should look at the end of the day, it's easier to start the next day when it's organized.
 
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