FJ62 Reimagined - Restoration - Modern Drivetrain - Stoffregen Motorsports

Are manual transmissions an option for such a swap?
Yes. We use an H55F Toyota 5 speed. They are super strong and shift very nicely.

LS swaps make everything better!
Absolutely. I don't care what's under the hood as long as it does the job. The LS does a great job. Hopefully I can get to do an FJ60/62 LT swap soon.

Still would like to do a 60 restoration with a 2.8L Cummins. Tagged for follow.
R2.8 is also a great engine, but I wonder how it would do in a rig as heavy as the FJ60/62.
 

lugueto

Adventurer
Taking a page from the second generation 70 series with the front coils / rear leafs?

Being somewhat of a purist I'd love to see a Toyota V8, but the R2.8 would still be awesome.

Keen to see how it turns out as usual!
 
Taking a page from the second generation 70 series with the front coils / rear leafs?

Being somewhat of a purist I'd love to see a Toyota V8, but the R2.8 would still be awesome.

Keen to see how it turns out as usual!
The coils/leafs situation was a compromise. The owner wanted to do an FJ80 chassis, but there are too may pitfalls with that conversion. Leaf springs in the rear just make sense for a "truck" with their parallel control arm geometry, but the radius arm front suspension does give a measurable amount of advantages, both on and off road.

A Toyota V8 just doesn't make sense. Dollar for dollar, pound for pound, a Toyota V8 doesn't stack up against the LS platform. If labor were free, you might have an argument, but then you'd have the myriad electronic and emissions hoops to jump through, and ultimately have less on tap than an LS. Other than seeing Toyota valve covers, the benefits do not outweigh the penalties. As for the R2.8 argument, this is not the vehicle for that. It really is all about the numbers here. While the R2.8 make impressive torque numbers, I don't feel that it is the right engine for this type of vehicle. In a much lighter vehicle, absolutely, but not an FJ60/62.

Thanks for your interest. I hope this build thread meets or even surpasses your standards.
 
As with any build, it all boils down to the process. This process began with a very nice northern California grown original FJ62. Disassembly ensued.









A donor FJ80 chassis had been previously sourced. Measurements were taken, and the plasma cutter began it's surgery.







Cutting the donor pieces off the FJ80 chassis enables us to place the original pieces in just the right places to get a proper view of things to come.

 
After a solid mock up using pieces from both the donor FJ80 chassis and the FJ62, we had a good idea of the layout of the new chassis. Pieces were scabbed off the donor chassis and new parts were sourced. Using a pair of radius arms from Delta Vehicle Systems, the ride height was set and a comprehensive mock-up was done to make sure all pieces of the puzzle were accounted for.















 
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A mix and match of FJ80 and FJ62 pieces were used in the radius arm FJ80 axle conversion, but almost all of the components were OEM Toyota. One part tha was not OEM was a new steering shaft from Borgeson. The older OEm joints are very large and could not clear the vital suspension components so parts were sourced from Borgeson to complete the task.

Having done a few of the FJ60/62 S conversions, we applied our knowledge to place the motor mounts, and those were welded in place while the suspension fabrication was being done.



Here, the new LS3 EROD is being mated up to the new transmission and set in place. Using and adapter, the new powertrain was adapted to the original Toyota split case transfer case.







A custom spacer is machined to get the proper clearance for the transfer case.

 
These conversions require a new transfer case crossmember location, and the manual trans crossmember location is different from the auto trans crossmember location. We've got all those bases covered.



With a new trans mount fabricated up, the engine and transmission now have a new home.

 
The radius arm conversion was done using all OEM components with the exception of new control arms from Delta Vehicle Systems. Careful cutting and some slight mods allow us to re-utilize the OEM Toyota frame brackets.



Our engine swaps can be done to any level of completion, but most of them require the engine bay to get a new coat of clean. Tool grey is the color of choice.

 
Trimming of the inner fender wells is required to fit the new front suspension.





New brackets were fabbed up for the front sway bar.



And custom slider brackets were also built to allow strong yet easily removable sliders to be installed.





 

lugueto

Adventurer
The coils/leafs situation was a compromise. The owner wanted to do an FJ80 chassis, but there are too may pitfalls with that conversion. Leaf springs in the rear just make sense for a "truck" with their parallel control arm geometry, but the radius arm front suspension does give a measurable amount of advantages, both on and off road.

A Toyota V8 just doesn't make sense. Dollar for dollar, pound for pound, a Toyota V8 doesn't stack up against the LS platform. If labor were free, you might have an argument, but then you'd have the myriad electronic and emissions hoops to jump through, and ultimately have less on tap than an LS. Other than seeing Toyota valve covers, the benefits do not outweigh the penalties. As for the R2.8 argument, this is not the vehicle for that. It really is all about the numbers here. While the R2.8 make impressive torque numbers, I don't feel that it is the right engine for this type of vehicle. In a much lighter vehicle, absolutely, but not an FJ60/62.

Thanks for your interest. I hope this build thread meets or even surpasses your standards.
I agree 100%. The Toyota engine would just satisfy my purist mindset, but the LS makes complete sense in the American market. There have been a few R2.8s installed on 60/62s, but its obvious it will be a slouch when compared to the V8. It would just be for the cool factor.

My standards really aren't that high, not even close to your level of craftmanship and attention to detail, so it's basically a certainty that you'll exceed them. I'm genuinely jealous of the owners that commisioned their builds to you. Kudos.
 
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