Fiskers X7 hatchet: NO!

geojag

Active member
I personally am not a fan of the Fiskars, but know they work well for a good many people. They are also a good choice for people who prefer to neglect their tools.

I have a couple issues with the - the bit shape (can't fix this) and the edge. As @jbaucom mentions above, the bit is a wedge, and a thick wedge at that. Most traditional axes have a bit of a hollow ground shape to the bit providing a thinner edge. Also, I prefer a curved cutting edge at the end of the bit, but the straight edge may be an advantage for easier sharpening.

The other issue is that the actual edge is essentially a Scandanavian grind. This results in a very thin edge that in my experience is brittle. With a belt sander or a piece of sandpaper and a mouse pad you can convex the edge which makes it much less prone to rolls or chipping.

Fiskars makes a splitting ax that is very good at its intended purpose, the wedge on that one is wider than on their axes and hatchets.

I think that the Fiskars works much better on soft wood, and that the wide wedge of the bit is a big disadvantage on hard woods.
 

Grassland

Well-known member
The way I read OP they are splitting with it, not chopping, so it didn't sound to me like they are using it for the wrong purpose.
I have a Fiskars axe and a splitter that's between a short axe and hatchet in size that is pretty handy, but forget the model.
 

TwinStick

Explorer
I would look at this as an opportunity. The opportunity to be generous and give it to someone that you know will appreciate it, like a young and upcoming camper or Scout member. They will never forget it. Then maybe they will pay it forward some day.

A knife or axe or any sharp instrument is viewed differently by different people. I am a "knife guy". Other knife people will understand this more than others. Everyone knows someone who uses their knife as a screwdriver all the time. Wrong tool for the job.....unless your life depends on it. I once sharpened a knife for a person who did that & I told him don't do that anymore because it is now wicked sharp. He didn't listen and cut his finger to the bone. It gave him grief for months until it finally healed.

I look at them as tools. I don't want to break one or chip one but if I do, I only have myself to blame. No big deal. If the OP doesn't like it, that's fine. Give it away or sell it & get something different. Rinse and repeat until you find your holy grail axe. I have a few axes but no high end axes. They all work great for me and like everyone else with common sense, if I had a Gransfor Bruks & a Home Depot axe & my neighbor wanted to borrow one, IT WOULD NOT BE THE GB !!! Some people chop into the ground with an axe, machete or knife.....because they don't know any better, then hit a rock & chip the blade & wonder why. My neighbor is "that guy". Lol, I don't let him borrow anything with a sharp edge. Lol
 

PlacidWaters

Adventurer
The way I read OP they are splitting with it, not chopping, so it didn't sound to me like they are using it for the wrong purpose.
I have a Fiskars axe and a splitter that's between a short axe and hatchet in size that is pretty handy, but forget the model.
Correct, I bought it to split kinding from wood up to about 4" in diameter. I found it really ineffective for that purpose. Sure, I could get a heavier hatchet or axe, but shouldn't any hatchet, regardless of size, be able to split dry 4" wood? If It can't handle wood that size, what's it good for? Granted, it was hardwood, but my old hatchet, barely sharpened, does a much better job.
 

pith helmet

Well-known member
Last time I took my Gerber camping I bought some gas station Aspen fire wood in CO. It split it fine....when I hammered it through with another piece of firewood. Those are lightweight, but I like them.
 

pith helmet

Well-known member
I am a tool abuser. I don't need really nice blades in my life. I have always gone for gerber knives and blades.
I have had both of these for 17 or 18 years. They don’t hold an edge like a high quality steel but they sharpen fast and what I need them to. I like the light weight and shock absorbency of the hollow handles.
 

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Regcabguy

Expedition Leader
I have an ancient American made axe. A local guy hones the blade to where I could almost shave with it. I've haven't had much luck with a hatchet. The axe never bounces back. I carry a bow saw also.
 

bas157

Member
I am a tool abuser. I don't need really nice blades in my life. I have always gone for gerber knives and blades.
I have had both of these for 17 or 18 years. They don’t hold an edge like a high quality steel but they sharpen fast and what I need them to. I like the light weight and shock absorbency of the hollow handles.
Pretty both of those are just rebranded Fiskars
 

67cj5

Man On a Mission
Every professional Axemen I have known beit a working Axe or a Competion Axe will always do the final shaping of the Axe by Hand them selves, and then they will spend days/weeks sharpening it until it is the is the way they want it,

Even a $2000 Racing Axe has to be finished by hand by the Owner.
 

burningac1d

New member
I read a lot of good reviews about the Fiskers X7 so I picked one up today. Very disappointed! It's too light to have much of an effect on cord hardwood (6" in diameter), but it's more than that: there's something weird about the shape of the blade. It more or less bounced back off the wood and took 7 or 8 hits to split very dry wood. Very little blade penetration with each hit. I got out my ancient $5 yard sale hatchet and sharpened it and it was far better. I'm going to return the Fiskers if Home Depot will accept it.
Did you return it finally? It's not an option when you'll face with serious logs. Isocore maul from Fiskars too(8 lbs - take a look at review!) would be more suitable for that. As said above, it's learning exercise anyway, don't care
 
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