Favorite Tire Repair Kit?

1leglance

2007 Expedition Trophy Champion, Overland Certifie

Recently during a novice Overlander class we got to put my Extreme Outback tire repair kit to good use.....

This led to my recommendations to the folks there and then after I got to wondering what others were actually using/liking.

So let's hear what everyone carries, if you have actually used it and any thoughts.
 

TantoTrailers

Well-known member
I keep a similar kit in the truck, I have a can of fix a flat in case I have a seal leak of some sort but I would resort to that as the last possible option including after limping it along with a compressor to a shop. A small 12v compressor is always in my truck as well. I have used the kit multiple times throughout my life and last time I brought it in to fix the tire shop asked if I wanted it replaced with one of their patches as if it was a fitting permanent solution already.
 

pluton

Adventurer
I bought a safety Seal kit about 15 years ago. I bring it when going to remote places but have never needed it. I've renewed the plugs once or twice in case they "go bad". Also cary 2 tall cans of fix a flat and if going really remote, 2 ways to inflate a tire, motor- and hand-powered
 

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SirCampalot

Adventurer
I've had great luck with the ARB kit. I've plugged around 5 passenger car tires and 1 BFG AT/KO2. Great kit at a reasonable price.
 

Ducky's Dad

Explorer
I have an ARB kit in one truck and a Safety Seal kit in the other. Seem to be pretty much the same, except for the color of the case. ARB worked fine the one time I really needed it. Both trucks carry cans of Fix-A-Flat and at least one compressor in each.
 

1leglance

2007 Expedition Trophy Champion, Overland Certifie
Looks like I am one of the few who actually has had to use a plug kit....a bunch of times over the years.

Good to hear folks carry a compressor as I agree this has saved my bacon in town when it was easier to just fill and drive to a shop.
 
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Low_Sky

Member
Plugs and associated tools get used the most.
I also carry patches of various sizes and associated tools and rubber cement.
Valve stem tool with replacement stems and cores.
Spray bottle of windshield fluid (for washing windshield and use as tire bead lube).
Tire spoons.
CO2 tank, hose and tire inflater.
Hi Lift jack for breaking tire beads.

The only part I haven’t used on the trail in the last two years is the patches. Just haven’t found a cut sidewall that was too big to plug and didn’t have a spare available.

I do more dedicated off-roading than overlanding, so my setup is probably overkill for a lot of the membership here.


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Plugs and associated tools get used the most.
I also carry patches of various sizes and associated tools and rubber cement.
Valve stem tool with replacement stems and cores.
Spray bottle of windshield fluid (for washing windshield and use as tire bead lube).
Tire spoons.
CO2 tank, hose and tire inflater.
Hi Lift jack for breaking tire beads.

The only part I haven’t used on the trail in the last two years is the patches. Just haven’t found a cut sidewall that was too big to plug and didn’t have a spare available.

I do more dedicated off-roading than overlanding, so my setup is probably overkill for a lot of the membership here.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
You forgot the can of engine starting fluid to seat the beads! Just kidding
 
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get a basic kit for the tools, then get some refill plugs and patches from local auto parts store. Always have a few extra tubes of rubber cement. If you open one, plan on replacing it when you get back home, they never last long once opened. Put you plugs in a vac sealed bag to help them live a little longer, usually 5 plugs per pack and keep about 5-6 packs. Extra valve stems, valve cores and valve core tool, few razor blades are good to have. Throw everything into a 30 cal ammo can.

I ended up stitching a sidewall and plugging the tire with 32 plugs and it was able to get back to base camp, this guy had two spares and went thru them both on a 6 mile trail. So you can never have too many extra plugs.

a good compressor is a great asset. I keep my co2 hidden from anyone that wants to air up, they can use the compressor. you only get about 16 air-ups on a 10lb co2 depending on what size tire.

my loaner is a viair 400p, then i have a smittybilt 2781 which is crazy fast, and a viair 450 hard mounted as backup which has never been used.

most worth while tool is also an electric impact. i have a nice makita one thats cranks out over 1100 ft/lb. which is handy to have on the trail .
 

1leglance

2007 Expedition Trophy Champion, Overland Certifie
I do love the electric impacts....beats the days of trying to make my on board air setup solid enough for an air impact.
 

TantoTrailers

Well-known member
Yea when I did my trip to CO I had my DeWalt impact and drill haha. I need some stem cores and a core tool good call! When you say patches/plugs to fix a sidewall, do you mean the type they use at tire shops that are inserted from the inside or the glue string type like used in the OP pic?
 

1leglance

2007 Expedition Trophy Champion, Overland Certifie
Yea when I did my trip to CO I had my DeWalt impact and drill haha. I need some stem cores and a core tool good call! When you say patches/plugs to fix a sidewall, do you mean the type they use at tire shops that are inserted from the inside or the glue string type like used in the OP pic?
The Extreme Outback kit I carry has 1 big patch and a few smaller patches like you used to use on bike tubes, they can be used to with heavy thread or wire to sew up a gashed sidewall and patch from the inside.
Yes you have to break the bead and either remove the tire from the wheel or lift the tire partly away from the wheel. But I have done it once and it was the only choice so just take your time and enjoy the outdoors.
 

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67cj5

Man On a Mission
I have the ARB Kit and 2 of their portable compressors, The ARB repair kit is about the best on the market and the Compressors speak for them selves.
 
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