F150 vs Tundra....I’ll make a decision tomorrow

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Deleted member 9101

Guest
I can get home with that pretty much no matter what happens, I can submerge it completely, drain it out, dry it out, put fluids in and drive away. Pretty sure I can't do that with a new computer driven Toyota, ford, dodge, chevy, Jeep, whatever.
Perspectives I guess.

Funny thing...I've been driving since 1994 and I've had one vehicle leave me stranded. It was a 2002 Tundra and although it was an easy fix, no one was open at 2000 on a Sunday night to get parts (alternator went out). Reguardless of what vehicle I would have been in, it still would have resulted in a tow truck taking me the last 70 miles of my trip home.

Also, I've never once worried about submerging a motor...haha.
 

direwolf82

Member
Funny thing...I've been driving since 1994 and I've had one vehicle leave me stranded. It was a 2002 Tundra and although it was an easy fix, no one was open at 2000 on a Sunday night to get parts (alternator went out). Reguardless of what vehicle I would have been in, it still would have resulted in a tow truck taking me the last 70 miles of my trip home.

Also, I've never once worried about submerging a motor...haha.
That's very true. I was thinking more along the lines of computers getting fried, sensor wires getting yanked off or just how to make it go, I can drive my old Jeep on 4 out of 8 cylinders banging away. If I can ever get a 12v cummins then even the alternator going out wouldn't matter. Pop start and away you go, during the day as you wouldn't have lights of course.
Fording seems to be a personal thing, I love it but many people prefer to avoid it. I don't like the idea of having a big bad 4x4 then having to turn around, will always wonder a. What was on the other side of that and b. How bad could it have been to try? Guess that's why I take my basically stock 4runner places I've seen lifted jeeps on big tires turn around at.


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D

Deleted member 9101

Guest
That's very true. I was thinking more along the lines of computers getting fried, sensor wires getting yanked off or just how to make it go, I can drive my old Jeep on 4 out of 8 cylinders banging away. If I can ever get a 12v cummins then even the alternator going out wouldn't matter. Pop start and away you go, during the day as you wouldn't have lights of course.
Fording seems to be a personal thing, I love it but many people prefer to avoid it. I don't like the idea of having a big bad 4x4 then having to turn around, will always wonder a. What was on the other side of that and b. How bad could it have been to try? Guess that's why I take my basically stock 4runner places I've seen lifted jeeps on big tires turn around at.


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Actually, computer controlled vehicles can run with a myraid of sensors failing or disconnected. They just revert to "closed loop" mode and run based on preprogrammed data vs. real time. It won't be as efficient or powerful as normal, but it will get you home with out harming the motor/tranny.

Now, when a "computer" failes, it's game over (depending on which one fails). If you think about it though, if the HEI system fails on an old small block or the diaphram denigrates on your carb, you're in a very similar situation... Only difference is your repair will probably be cheaper...lol.

Honestly though, I've had far fewer problems with "new" vehicles than older ones. At the mileage where a small block or TH350/C6 would be considered "worn out" is nothing to a newer drivetrain. Also, kind of enjoy not adjusting valves, setting dwell, or dealing with the ever shifting timing...haha.
 

direwolf82

Member
Actually, computer controlled vehicles can run with a myraid of sensors failing or disconnected. They just revert to "closed loop" mode and run based on preprogrammed data vs. real time. It won't be as efficient or powerful as normal, but it will get you home with out harming the motor/tranny.

Now, when a "computer" failes, it's game over (depending on which one fails). If you think about it though, if the HEI system fails on an old small block or the diaphram denigrates on your carb, you're in a very similar situation... Only difference is your repair will probably be cheaper...lol.

Honestly though, I've had far fewer problems with "new" vehicles than older ones. At the mileage where a small block or TH350/C6 would be considered "worn out" is nothing to a newer drivetrain. Also, kind of enjoy not adjusting valves, setting dwell, or dealing with the ever shifting timing...haha.
True again, unless your talking cam and crank sensors or things like that. I feel like I can rubber band the old stuff together a whole lot easier though and there is just less stuff to fail to begin with. I can inspect mechanical components and get a rough idea of life expectancy or wear, I can't do that with sensors and such. The Jeep has maybe 60 feet of wire in it, I shudder to think about tracing an electrical issue in the Toyota.
I've been stuck in computer controlled cars more than mechanical. Plus I can bring spares, carb rebuild kit? Cheap insurance to have and it's in the truck right now, Extra computer? Probably won't bring a spare of those. Fuel pump? Mechanicals are pretty cheap since they only need to put out 5 or 6 psi, I can't afford to have spares of the fancy new stuff but 60 year old tech is pretty cheap and easy to work with, for me at least since I grew up setting dwell, cleaning points with matchbook strikers, carbs and stick shifts.
We seized an old ford transmissions in the woods once, yanked it out, tore it down, pulled the broken 2nd gear components, slammed it back in and made it back to my friends place for a real rebuild. Don't think the Toyota would be happy if I tried that with her.
Hell, I run safety split rims so I can patch tires and replace tubes(yeah, I said it, tubes)out in the field. Old school? Oh yeah, but I can fix a sidewall tear pretty nicely and securely. And no, they aren't the illegal split rims.
The new stuff and old has it's place for everyone, personally for me I'll take the old stuff into the deep wood for a week long trip before I take a modern car. I would much rather drive to the trailhead in the modern car though.
I'm not saying older is better, I'm not saying newer is better. Just for me and what I do I'll take the old stuff, I just feel more confident in working on it on the side of a trail if I end up there. Plus I like to tinker and tune the carb and timing, watch that vacuum gauge!
In no way am I an expert, just a crusty plumber that likes wrenches and hammers as opposed to scanners and sensors when your in the field.


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