F150 - 2.7L vs 3.5L vs 5.0L

Todd n Natalie

OverCamper
That was my understanding that the 7.3 is a "modern" engine whatever new and unproven things are associated with it (given strict EPA regulations too).
I would love to be proven wrong.


Thanks, this is very interesting.
One question, isn't what you described more of an "old schools engine" than the 6.2? I wonder why did Ford have to "revert back"? could not they just make the 6.2 bigger?
Yes, I would say the 7.3L is more old school than the 6.2L. I read that is was designed for reliability and serviceability in fleet use.


 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
That was my understanding that the 7.3 is a "modern" engine whatever new and unproven things are associated with it (given strict EPA regulations too).
I would love to be proven wrong.


Thanks, this is very interesting.
One question, isn't what you described more of an "old schools engine" than the 6.2? I wonder why did Ford have to "revert back"? could not they just make the 6.2 bigger?
Fleet service engine they were targeting lower cost diesel replacement option not high performance.
 

Explorerinil

Observer
That was my understanding that the 7.3 is a "modern" engine whatever new and unproven things are associated with it (given strict EPA regulations too).
I would love to be proven wrong.


Thanks, this is very interesting.
One question, isn't what you described more of an "old schools engine" than the 6.2? I wonder why did Ford have to "revert back"? could not they just make the 6.2 bigger?
The 7.3 replaces the v10. The 7.3 also makes power lower in the rpm range vs the 6.2 dual overhead cam. The 7.3 was made to be a medium duty gas engine that’s easy to repair, compact design that can fit in everything from f250 to f600 I believe. Blue bird is now sourcing them in gas and propane for their new busses. The 6.2, is a great engine that makes decent power, but it’s far more complex than the 7.3.
 

1000arms

Well-known member
"Designed for use in the Super Duty F-250 and F-350 trucks and other applications, the 7.3-liter engine pounds the ground with over 400 lb-ft of torque from 1,500 to 5,500 rpm, with the 475 lb-ft peak. Horsepower tops out at 430 at 5,500 rpm. With the right mods its personality could get a lot more powerful." is from:

 

Regcabguy

Expedition Leader
It's so hard took away from the hp and tq of the newer 3.5L EcoBoost
My friend who has a 5.9 Cummins pre-emissions '05 with a Goerend trans and Smarty turned up drove a new F-150 2.7 this week and said it would smoke his Ram. He backed off on the gas on the freeway and the mpg readout said 25 mpg. I know that's overly generous but it hauled ass with the 10 speed transmission.
 

Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
My friend who has a 5.9 Cummins pre-emissions '05 with a Goerend trans and Smarty turned up drove a new F-150 2.7 this week and said it would smoke his Ram. He backed off on the gas on the freeway and the mpg readout said 25 mpg. I know that's overly generous but it hauled ass with the 10 speed transmission.
Meh. I'm highly skeptical of these stratospheric MPG claims, particularly for the 3.5. I drive like an old grandma and it's tough for me to break 16 MPG. Of course, most of my trips are short city trips but even on the highway, 18 is the best I see on a regular basis.

The only way I can figure people are getting 20+ MPG on a regular basis is that they have a long commute that features a lot of freeway time, is relatively flat and there is no wind. Any kind of stop-and-go, any kind of climbing, or any kind of wind will knock MPG down quickly, at least that's my experience.

I'm on a couple of FB groups and people on there are always bragging about 20+ MPG numbers. I can't help but wonder if most of them are running 2wd trucks on factory tires and driving 50+ miles of flat, windless freeway every day.
 

Todd n Natalie

OverCamper
The only way I can figure people are getting 20+ MPG on a regular basis is that they have a long commute that features a lot of freeway time, is relatively flat and there is no wind.
That's my commute. 60 miles of highway / freeway with cruise set at 65.

5.0L w/ 3:73's. 6 speed and duratracs.

In the summer I usually average 19-21.

I suspect that my 3.5 w/ 10 speed and 3.55's should do better as I think it should stay out of boost on that same commute.

(If I ever get it)
 

D45

Explorer
On a 7 hour drive, I did pull really good numbers in my old 2012 F150 3.5L

2 adults and one child and the bed packed full

Round trip I averaged over 18 mpg

I had a cap on the bed and the truck has 3.73s, with the 6 speed
 

deserteagle56

Adventurer
Meh. I'm highly skeptical of these stratospheric MPG claims, particularly for the 3.5. I drive like an old grandma and it's tough for me to break 16 MPG. Of course, most of my trips are short city trips but even on the highway, 18 is the best I see on a regular basis.

The only way I can figure people are getting 20+ MPG on a regular basis is that they have a long commute that features a lot of freeway time, is relatively flat and there is no wind. Any kind of stop-and-go, any kind of climbing, or any kind of wind will knock MPG down quickly, at least that's my experience.

I'm on a couple of FB groups and people on there are always bragging about 20+ MPG numbers. I can't help but wonder if most of them are running 2wd trucks on factory tires and driving 50+ miles of flat, windless freeway every day.
Of course a lot of it depends on how YOU drive and the driving conditions you mention, especially the stop-and-go. Mountains don't seem to affect the mileage on my truck that much - seems like the mileage I lose going up a mountain pass is regained going down the other side...I live in Nevada where there are a LOT of high mountain passes. Those turbos laugh at mountains! I think it must have a lot to do with the individual truck also.

I'm one of the lucky ones. 2016 F150 Supercab bought new in May 2016. 3.5 Ecoboost, 4x4, 3.55 gears, wearing LT265/70R17 load range E tires. This truck has been outstanding in every way. Oil changes and tire rotations are all its needed since new. As with all my vehicles, I maintain a log book to log everything, including fueling. Periodically I enter all the fuel data into an Excel spreadsheet which calculates the fuel mileage exactly. With nearly 58,000 miles on the odometer now, the overall fuel mileage according to the spreadsheet is 20.66 mpg. Looking at my spreadsheet, my absolute worst mileage was 13.8 mpg recorded when towing 4,000 lbs into a fierce headwind. The best mileage was 24.09.

I think it helps my mileage that I live in an area with very few paved roads - but miles of very good dirt roads so I do a lot of driving at 45 - 60 mph. Shots taken at dawn yesterday:
P1013951erexpportal.jpg

P1013952erexpportal.jpg

That's an 800 lb Yamaha Kodiak in the back, plus there's a lot of gear on the back seat. When I got home last night my lie-o-meter was indicating 21.8 mpg but since it is almost always optimistic I figure the actual mileage is closer to 20.8.
 
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Jupiter58

Active member
Meh. I'm highly skeptical of these stratospheric MPG claims, particularly for the 3.5. I drive like an old grandma and it's tough for me to break 16 MPG. Of course, most of my trips are short city trips but even on the highway, 18 is the best I see on a regular basis.

The only way I can figure people are getting 20+ MPG on a regular basis is that they have a long commute that features a lot of freeway time, is relatively flat and there is no wind. Any kind of stop-and-go, any kind of climbing, or any kind of wind will knock MPG down quickly, at least that's my experience.

I'm on a couple of FB groups and people on there are always bragging about 20+ MPG numbers. I can't help but wonder if most of them are running 2wd trucks on factory tires and driving 50+ miles of flat, windless freeway every day.
I am the opposite! I wonder how people can only get 16 mpg. Do you use eco mode at all? I have to beat the heck out of mine to get down under 20. All Flat down here though.

I do notice I have lost about 1-2 mpg in all my vehicles since January. Anyone else have that issue?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

ricoisme26

Active member
more data points to throw in the mix:

2012 CrewCab short bed with a cap on the bed and typically about 100lbs of tools in the bed

Daily commute I was averaging about 14mpg, I climb about 900ft in elevation over 7 miles to work
My fiance has been driving it daily for about 2.5 months now, her commute is similar about a mile shorter overall and she gets about 12.5mpg. I give her benefit of the doubt that she's been driving it in the coldest weather Jan-Feb temps 5F-25F most days. Will be interesting if it picks up with the warmer weather or if she can't blame the weather any longer

Highway trips I've seen around 17-17.5 running 65-70
Highway trips running 70-80 15mpg
both above scenarios are loaded with more luggage and sometimes more family members

Best mileage is rolling hills backroads like when I go to a family camp or even just visit my parents about an hour away, any drive approaching an hour or longer in length with speeds 45-60mph usually gets close to 18mpg (unloaded)
 

onemanarmy

Explorer
My family sample size is not good for Ford. 2 F150s, both garbage..
This is what is so wrong with car froums. There are thousands of mitigating circumstances that could cause a vehicle to fail in hundreds of ways.

This 'my truck was gargbage' with no background info skews perceptions and offers no real world useable info.

And when asked.....simple minded responses like 'motor blew up' is even worse.
 
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