Extreme use Earthroamer

waveslider

Outdoorsman
TnN, I can't speak for the Vancouver drivers, but the Idaho logging road drivers are a bit of a random sampling. Some of them are quite reasonable and others will run you off the road the first chance they get.

As a result, we will occasionally pre-ride a selected road with the e-Bike to make sure its not an active road before committing the big rig to a narrow, winding road which frequently has a 2k foot drop off.
 

FrenchieXJ

Expedition Leader
Isn't this whole web site about Expeditions?

Howard
This forum started out about Expedition and Overlanding forum! Though in the last 3 or 4 years it has migrated with more of the offroading.

In case anyone of you want to be politically correct the term for Offroading is "Off-highway. Unless your on private property or a designated open area. it is off-highway. This was brought about by trying to clean-up our asumption thatmany people "Offroading" has, of driving over vegitation, aminals, and distroying the environment. I will point out that this may have been many years ago before we got educated about the environment. That has changed for the most part, but there are still some people that do this.

OK! Back to the topic at hand, Mine is bigger and better then yours.🦕🐳

Da Frenchman
 

Trikebubble

Adventurer
Is there room for that on those logging roads or was there damage to your vehicle as a result? Curious as I've never explored any logging roads but sounds like it could be fun.
Their are pullouts on the logging roads, if you have the right radio and listen you will know when to pull over and wait. I don't, so I just drive with extreme care. Most logging trucvks are the regualr on-road ones and usually you have enough room to squeeze by. The large off-road ones do really take up 95% of the road, so you just kind of slowly pull into the ditch area and let it lumber by, then hopefully you can pull back onto the road after that. The logging trucks are in contact with each other and I believe will relay information on civilians traveling on their roads. It's a little hairy but well worth it when you find what is at the end of some of these logging roads.
 

al_burpe

Observer
Is there room for that on those logging roads or was there damage to your vehicle as a result? Curious as I've never explored any logging roads but sounds like it could be fun.
Where I grew up in Idaho, it was advisable to have a cb when driving on logging roads. The road would have the station posted and mile markers painted on the trees. You would call out your mile markers for on coming traffic.
 
Where I grew up in Idaho, it was advisable to have a cb when driving on logging roads. The road would have the station posted and mile markers painted on the trees. You would call out your mile markers for on coming traffic.
So just call them out at random as you're driving or would you be in contact with oncoming traffic along the way?
 

Trikebubble

Adventurer
So just call them out at random as you're driving or would you be in contact with oncoming traffic along the way?
In BC, each road is given a specific fequency channel (I believe they use VHF or something like that). Their are large signs letting you know the frequcny channel to listen to, if you have the right type of radio (they don't use CB's here). The logging truck drivers will call either up or down and a certain kilometer marker on the given road to let other logging truck drivers know their location. Around here you see signs saying "Must Call 13-Down" (for instance) all over the place. Again, it's just part of life living here in BC. Logging roads will take you everywhere, so you just get used ot traveling on them, knowing where active logging is taking place, and be cautious.
 

shade

Well-known member
In BC, each road is given a specific fequency channel (I believe they use VHF or something like that). Their are large signs letting you know the frequcny channel to listen to, if you have the right type of radio (they don't use CB's here). The logging truck drivers will call either up or down and a certain kilometer marker on the given road to let other logging truck drivers know their location. Around here you see signs saying "Must Call 13-Down" (for instance) all over the place. Again, it's just part of life living here in BC. Logging roads will take you everywhere, so you just get used ot traveling on them, knowing where active logging is taking place, and be cautious.
Good advice.

I spent a night at Wistaria Provincial Park while wandering north and ended up in an active logging area without a CB. I think that's the only time I ever wished I'd had one because the roads were well marked just as Trikebubble described. Fortunately, the roads were wide and the drivers were courteous and careful - the heavy rainfall probably helped.
 
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AbleGuy

[Back] Roads Scholar
TnN, I can't speak for the Vancouver drivers, but the Idaho logging road drivers are a bit of a random sampling. Some of them are quite reasonable and others will run you off the road the first chance they get.

As a result, we will occasionally pre-ride a selected road with the e-Bike to make sure its not an active road before committing the big rig to a narrow, winding road which frequently has a 2k foot drop off.
Yup, it’s never been a good idea to try to play chicken with a log truck driver.
 

shade

Well-known member
Yup, it’s never been a good idea to try to play chicken with a log truck driver.
The truly dangerous part is they may not be able to do anything, even if they want to give another vehicle room. Stopping a big truck with a heavy load on questionable terrain is similar to stopping a train. Swerving can be a very bad idea for everyone.

On roads like those, I consider myself a guest. Public or private, they're made and maintained for industry, not tourism. If enough people cause enough problems, use can be restricted.
 

AbleGuy

[Back] Roads Scholar
The truly dangerous part is they may not be able to do anything, even if they want to give another vehicle room. Stopping a big truck with a heavy load on questionable terrain is similar to stopping a train. Swerving can be a very bad idea for everyone.

On roads like those, I consider myself a guest. Public or private, they're made and maintained for industry, not tourism. If enough people cause enough problems, use can be restricted.
And coming down a steep hill, fully loaded, you cannot expect the truck driver to have much of an ability to quickly stop or zig around you. They’re usually going pretty fast too, because these guys are trying make a living. We have to respect that, whether we agree or not with what they’re doing out there.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
In BC, each road is given a specific fequency channel (I believe they use VHF or something like that). Their are large signs letting you know the frequcny channel to listen to, if you have the right type of radio (they don't use CB's here). The logging truck drivers will call either up or down and a certain kilometer marker on the given road to let other logging truck drivers know their location. Around here you see signs saying "Must Call 13-Down" (for instance) all over the place. Again, it's just part of life living here in BC. Logging roads will take you everywhere, so you just get used ot traveling on them, knowing where active logging is taking place, and be cautious.
I drove pickups on RR (resource roads) for years but once I started pulling trailers on the RR I got a radio and licence. It is great knowing what is on the road...wish everyone pulling a trailer or with a dual wheel truck did the same!

The RR are radio assisted not radio controlled so there is no requirement to have a radio.

The 35 RR channels in BC are VHF. A CB won't work.

An operator has to be licences to use these frequencies but I've only heard or radios being seized when people abuse the privledge.

Fifteen of the channels are not to be used within 40 miles of the USA border. I think these are Military Auxiliary Radio Service (MARS) frequencies.


Each road (active roads for sure) will have a sign at the start (up) of a road. Some signs will list the call procedure. Due to the fact that some RR are numbers I call the name/number - then up/down - then the km.
A call list.
1. Number or name of RR you're on
2. Up - Down - Stopped - Leaving
3. Kilometer number you're at. Often one calls even going up and odd going down
3. What you are vehicle is. I call "Pickup with 5th Wheel Camper"

Vehicles going down have the right of way.

Everyone on RR with a radio will report vehicles without a radio.

If the road is not active or you find youself coming in at the at the end (down) of the a RR there may not be a sign.

Below are the RR channel maps. I keep a binder in glove compartment with the pages.

***The signs on the RR take precedence over the web site info.***


MUST CALLS are for sharp turns, single lane section of roads/bridges. A MUST CALL is a warning of dangerous road conditions.

There is no way a 100,000lb logging truck can stop. I know someone that dives them. On some routes leaving a cut once they roll over the edge there is no way to stop for miles. These routes will have KEEP OUT ACTIVE LOGGING signs.
 
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AbleGuy

[Back] Roads Scholar
I wonder if there is a automatic timer on the forum that we can set so this topic comes up every 3 months as a matter of course?

That way no one has to remember "Oh, it's my turn to start the "large expo vehicle/rock crawler/offroad vs bad road butthurt pissing match" thread. It gets annoying when someone misses their turn and we have to wait a whole 5 or 6 months for it to come around again.
Great Quote.....so here’s the human assisted auto timer to re-set this entertaining thread, which is definitely worth re-posting to keep up the chatter....🥳
 

waveslider

Outdoorsman
Good deal, thanks Able guy. Which angle shall we take on this go around?

Will it be the "My truck is bigger and more expensive therefore its clearly superior...." angle or will go with the time-tested approach of "Even if I had the money, those things are far too big to do any REAL off-roading or rock-crawling so therefore they are a waste of money for anyone and should be banned from the planet - my Landcruiser is badass...."?

Maybe we'll get lucky and have both...
 
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