Exploring the Northern Bighorn Mtns

ttora4runner

Expedition Leader
Felt the itch this weekend to get out and do some exploring in the Northern Bighorn Mountains and attempt to do some fishing.

Fishing attempt and Sibley Lake and some random pond, in which I caught I caught jack squat and learned my reel is screwed up.

Trails: FS 167, Freeze Out Point, Riley/Dry Fork Ridge, Skull Ridge and an attempt to find the remains of Bald Mountain City.

Sibley Lake


View of Twin Buttes from FS Rd 15


Out on FS Rd 167


One of the rare times I've come across Moose's on the trail


Water Crossing before rejoining FS Rd 168


The routes that lead to the ridges and ATV trails


Views from Freeze Out Point










Views from Riley/Dry Fork Ridge








The route up Skull Ridge and the surrounding area






Near the end of the trail


End of the route - there's an old ATV trail past the sign


Random Photos


 
Last edited:

ttora4runner

Expedition Leader
Headin back down the trial






Wasted some time trying to catch a few small fish in this pond


Tried to find the remains of Bald Mountain City but only came across a few scattered structures like this


 

jackkent

New member
Nice photos. I laughed when you post about wasting some time trying to catch a small fish in the small pond but that's still okay, charged to experienced ;) Better luck next time maybe. This is still a great adventure though. What was your favorite part of this trip?
 

xjaugie

Adventurer
I'm with backwoods rambler, those "got an itch trips" are the best for clearing the mind. Great scenery and photos.
 

ttora4runner

Expedition Leader
Gotta love the "felt an itch" trips! Great images of great scenery! :smiley_drive:
I'm with backwoods rambler, those "got an itch trips" are the best for clearing the mind. Great scenery and photos.
I can't agree more. I think with these types of trips I tend to relax more.

Nice photos. I laughed when you post about wasting some time trying to catch a small fish in the small pond but that's still okay, charged to experienced ;) Better luck next time maybe. This is still a great adventure though. What was your favorite part of this trip?
Ya, I fiqured I wouldn't catch anything but I wanted to try. Wasn't in hurry to get anywhere any ways.
 

ttora4runner

Expedition Leader
Changed the tile of the thread so I can kick a running thread for the Northern Bighorn Mountain trips.

7-4-13

Headed back up into the Bighorn Mountains on the 4th of July to visit two waterfalls in the area: Bucking Mule and Porcupine. Also, to make another attempt to find the site of Bald Mountain City.

Bucking Mule Falls

The drive to the trailhead


On the trail - the trail for the most part stays with the trees.


The falls overlook - this is the close as you can get that I know of.




View towards the west


Porcupine Falls






My understanding is that gold miners cut this portion of the falls in to help with their operation.

Found the site of Bald Mountain City, apparently I didn't drive down the spur road far enough on my first trip.


The hike to Bucking Mules is 2.5 miles one way and is a pretty mellow trail and is mostly dirt with few rocks till the end of the trail. There is one bridge crossing. Porcupine I want to say in .5 miles one way down hill. The first section has a series of switchbacks and is mostly dirt. A third of the way you come to set of wooden stairs/erosion control measures (whatever you want to call it) the final third is rocky but not bad.

Sorry, for the lack of photo's the camera operator was having issues :sombrero:.
 

Skavenger

Observer
I really need to explore the bighorns more. I live in Powell and work at Bighorn Canyon so I have no excuses lol. You took some awesome pictures and your trips looked fun!
 

ttora4runner

Expedition Leader
Woodchuck Pass 8.24.13

I don't know if it was the cool damp air, the smell of campfires all around me or a combination of the two but I couldn't think of a better way to start the 17 mile mountain bike ride though Woodchuck Pass.
Woodchuck Pass consist of three Forest Service Roads 226, 277 and 278 making one giant loop, FSR 226 is the most difficult of the three roads due to either a steep rocky accent or descent along with 4 creek crossings only about foot or so deep one of which you can't see the bottom due to all the sediment in it. FSR226 also has 3 gates which must also be opened and closed.
Forest Service Roads 277 and 278 have some rocky and steep parts but nothing compared to 226.
Looking towards Woodchuck Pass

Looking back from the top of the pass

The route ahead

Looking back to Woodchuck Pass from FSR278 (the connecting trail between FSR 226 and 277)





Hoping that it doesn't rain on me

On FSR277 nearing the junction with FSR226 and the halfway point.


Forest Service Roads 226 – no really photos from this section of the trail since it's mostly a rocky uphill though the pines and well I just wanted to get through it.

The least shallow of the 4 water crossings - only about ankle deep.

Nearing the junction with 278 and the longest and probable the most difficult water crossing
 
Last edited:

ttora4runner

Expedition Leader
The one water crossing that I don’t think I’d want to run solo.

People have made two alternate crossing to the right of the above photo though the grass and have torn it up some trying to get though. The Forest Service blocked off another crossing to the left in this photo.
The last stint of the trip is back down-hill along FSR 226 to the junction of Red Grade Road and back to the parking area. After 17 miles I was glad to be back at my car and relax and to head back home. I’m looking forward to possible returning and camping in the area and maybe try the water crossing.
Three final photos of the old splash dam that you pass along Red Grade Road.


 

Forum statistics

Threads
179,204
Messages
2,793,419
Members
214,212
Latest member
JordanW
Top