Expeditions 7: Two Years Around the World on all Seven Continents.

grimbo

Explorer
Why the 20 hours per stint of driving? Seems like a lot of pressure on drivers to battle through fatigue and I'd imagine the constant daylight would just add to havoc being played on your body clock
 

Scott Brady

Founder
Why the 20 hours per stint of driving? Seems like a lot of pressure on drivers to battle through fatigue and I'd imagine the constant daylight would just add to havoc being played on your body clock
We have multiple drivers per car. The trucks never shut off and you only have the fuel you carry with you, so the goal is to push. It is also fatiguing and a challenge to set camp in those conditions, so those who have come before us have determined that this is the optimal balance.

Of course, conditions dictate. If the snow and visibility is good, then we can drive fewer hours and have longer breaks. If conditions are bad, then you don't stop driving. . . There is no "next flight" option ;)
 

Redline

Likes to Drive and Ride
snip...
When I was in Africa, I did a thorough test of a borrowed 28-300mm, while I still had my standby 17-40 and 70-200 2.8L as backup. I never took the 28-300 off, and was quite happy with the images. I never noticed the weight. At 240lbs. I don't even notice one camera over the other with regards to weight. If I was hiking with it, then a different deal. snip...
Recently I purchased and have used a lens with a very similar angle-of-view. I've never used a 'super-zoom' lens before, but was impressed with the utility. Infrequently changing lenses certainly has advantages, even in less extreme environments.
 

Every Miles A Memory

Expedition Leader
Ok, received my Sigma lens in the mail a few days ago. It's useless on a Full Frame body, so forget my entire post :(

Works great on the 7D Body and is probably where it'll reside while traveling
 

zimm

Expedition Leader
The old wives tale of sleeping in little or no clothing inside your sleeping bag has killed a lot of people. Sure, you warm up the insulation of the bag more quickly, but the total insulation is much less.
funny you should mention that. i was having lunch with the dear dr. shue last week, and he insisted you took everything off and slept with it, especially your m-14. 1959 US Army cold weather training in Alaska. I kept lookin at him funny. id only be exposed long enough to change the layer closest to the sphincter, and thats only once week if necessary. he insisted curled up in fetal with skin on skin was better than being in cloths, and it got the sweat off. i insisted that was just perception from having a few warm areas and the rest of you is freezing to death. it was easier to agree im an idiot and move on discussing healthcare.
 
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zimm

Expedition Leader
You loose a heck of a lot of heat from your head, even with hair.
thats a yes and no.

the issue is, people think you lose more heat from your head than other areas, and thats not true. heat transfer is directly correlated to area of exposure, albeit your head or bicep. as such those of you not bald, really do have an advantage, if its not a clean and blowing in the wind.

ive had people in tshirts and tassel caps at ballgames tell me they were loosing less heat than a hatless guy in a jacket.
 

Scott Brady

Founder
thats a yes and no.

the issue is, people think you lose more heat from your head than other areas, and thats not true. heat transfer is directly correlated to area of exposure, albeit your head or bicep. as such those of you not bald, really do have an advantage, if its not a clean and blowing in the wind.
You seem to be correct Zimmster. Interesting article. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20130708-is-most-heat-lost-from-your-head

Looks to be only about a 10% increase in heat loss through your head than any other similar surface area of skin. Most likely due to the vascularity and skin thickness close to the scalp.

Being bald, I really do need to be careful. I am bringing three wool beanies just in case.
 

BIGdaddy

Expedition Leader
For tents, we are using two different models, most from Nemo, but a few built by an obscure manufacturer in Norway called Nanok

Nemo has really pushed into the specialty markets, even making overland specific tents. I have been close friends with Cam, Nemo's CEO for years, and we have traveled quite a bit together. I asked him which tents and sleeping bags to use, and in good faith he suggested a few competing brands, but also some new products his team had developed. Knowing my friend wouldn't let me freeze to death, we are using Cam's most recent mountaineering and antarctic offerings.

We are using three Moki 3p tents with vestibule and the connection tubes. http://www.nemoequipment.com/product/?p=Moki+3P
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Note: We are not paid to use any of this gear.
I really like the idea of having a "hallway" between tents. With myself and my wife in one, and our three girls in the other, I don't think my wife would feel as disconnected from them (which has prevented us from moving to 2 smaller, more manageable tents rather than one giant "party" tent. Pretty legit. Also, I think people tend to under-estimate how hard on a tend kids can be. Probably the same wear in a long weekend that most adults cause in a twice or three times as many nights - especially the zippers and mesh screening. haha!
 

graynomad

Photographer, traveller
people think you lose more heat from your head than other areas, and thats not true. heat transfer is directly correlated to area of exposure,
Correct, I often see that comment and want to ask "under what circumstances", I was going to expand on it but didn't think it was worth it.

Obviously it depends a lot on other factors, for example if you're completely naked then the head part is a small percentage and a hat will have little affect. However I think when in your sleeping bag and the head is the only exposed part you could easily claim that's the major source of heat loss because it's essentially the only source of heat loss. Same if you're rugged up outside with no hat.

Also I suspect that not all surfaces on the body would lose heat at the same rate, for example the head has a lot more blood flow then say the knees, but I'm an electronics engineer so this is not exactly my area of expertise.

Anybody got a thermal image of a body, it would be interesting to see if that is indeed the case.
 

Scott Brady

Founder
Working through the personal equipment for the trip, primarily clothing. It all fit in two med-sized duffles, along with the sleeping bag and tent. The manufactures listed are just what we chose. In some cases, our research resulted in a few different options.


All of it laid out. Finding any replacements will be difficult in Africa. Impossible in Antarctica. . .

Environmental_Layer.jpg
Environmental (outer) Layer
Extreme condition boot - tall Baffin or Mukluk
Operational conditions boot - Salomon
Operational conditions gaiters - OR
Extreme condition insulated parka - Baffin
Extreme condition insulated pant - Baffin
Operational conditions shell jacket - Triple Aught Designs
Operational conditions shell pant - 66 North
Arctic Hat, animal fur or similar (optional) - Canada Goose Aviator or similar (if jacket is not hooded)
Extreme conditions mitt - Baffin
Operational conditions glove. Five fingered - Arc'Teryx Zenta AR

mid_layer.jpg
Mid Layer: Note, some used in warmer conditions like Novo and indoors at Novo and SP Station
Operational gloves. High function with insulation
Sweater. Wool - Triple Aught Designs Service Sweater, wool
Flight and Novo Pants - Triple Aught Design Doomsday Canvas
Performance insulation layer. bottom - Baffin
Performance insulation layer. top - Baffin and 66 North
Down mid-layer jacket - Down sweater or similar. Arc'Teryx and Marmot
Polar cap - Triple Aught Design Watch Cap, Wool
Balaclava - ColdAvenger
Neck warmer or scarf -
Heavy Socks - Over the calf wool or similar - Baffin

base_layer.jpg
Base Layers
Silk Gloves (Pair)
Underwear (comfort over technical performance)
Long Underwear Bottom. Wool preferred - Arc'Teryx
Long Underwear Top. Wool preferred - Arc'Teryx and ExOfficio
Socks - Over the Calf Liner. Silk or material of pref. - Vagden or similar
Thin beanie cap - Arc'Teryx
Base Layer Balaclava (optional) - Triple Aught Designs

Personal and Hygiene - Some additional personal kit items. Not comprehensive as other items are covered in team equipment
Sunglasses (with retention cord) - American Optics or Oakley
Glacier Sunglasses (optional) - Julbo Vermont
Goggles - Oakley
Down bootie -
Watch - automatic or similar (optional) - Traser
Belt
Folding knife
Flashlight (optional)
Passport
Multi-vitamins
Ibuprofen or similar NSAID
Personal medications as required
Sunscreen (SPF 50 minimum)
Hand and face salve (dryness)
Mosquito repellant*
Goldbond powder or equivalent
Lip balm (with SPF 15 minimum)
Melatonin sleeping aid
Eye cover sleeping aid
Dopp Kit (tooth brush, tooth paste, deodorant, etc.)
Wet wipes
Synthetic towel, quick dry in mesh bag
Ear plugs
1 Liter drinking bottle (insulated preferred)
1 Liter urine bottle
Leatherman or similar
Lighter
Small sewing repair kit
Contact list and numbers
Pen and Paper (personal)
Reading glasses as required (plus spare)
$200 USD
2,000 RAND
 

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grimbo

Explorer
Mosquito repellant?

I'd probably have my drinking bottle and urine bottle different sizes, just in case:)
 
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