ExOffico: Give-N-Go Tee Shirts -- rubbish!

djm68

Observer
I travel quite extensively on business (from the US to Europe). At the end of my business trips I usually take a holiday and head somewhere in Europe that is off the beaten path. I like to hike, dive, kayak, etc. I like to travel light, so I am always looking for clothes that can double for work and then fun. I've been using Icebreaker or Smartwool, but find those shirts a bit on the fragile side. I've heard much about ExOffico, so decided to give them a try. Bought two tees and a pair of the boxer briefs.

The tee shirt material is really comfortable and the cut of the shirt is perfect for my build (5'9" 160 lbs, fit), but the fabric is wildly fragile. Within 5 minutes of wearing the shirt, my small dog managed to put a big snag in the front of the shirt. Then I put on a small backpack which had a loose velcro strap. The velcro stuck to the shirt so tightly -- it was impossible to remove it without totally ruining the fabric.

Sent to emails to ExOffico customer support -- no reply after several weeks. Called and after sitting on hold for 30-ish minutes, I talked to a representative who informed me (rather tersely) Give-N-Go shirts are not intended to be worn alone and should be worn under another shirt.

'Adventure' t-shirts that are expensive, fragile, and have a limited use case? Disappointing.

DJM
 

shade

Well-known member
I travel quite extensively on business (from the US to Europe). At the end of my business trips I usually take a holiday and head somewhere in Europe that is off the beaten path. I like to hike, dive, kayak, etc. I like to travel light, so I am always looking for clothes that can double for work and then fun. I've been using Icebreaker or Smartwool, but find those shirts a bit on the fragile side. I've heard much about ExOffico, so decided to give them a try. Bought two tees and a pair of the boxer briefs.

The tee shirt material is really comfortable and the cut of the shirt is perfect for my build (5'9" 160 lbs, fit), but the fabric is wildly fragile. Within 5 minutes of wearing the shirt, my small dog managed to put a big snag in the front of the shirt. Then I put on a small backpack which had a loose velcro strap. The velcro stuck to the shirt so tightly -- it was impossible to remove it without totally ruining the fabric.

Sent to emails to ExOffico customer support -- no reply after several weeks. Called and after sitting on hold for 30-ish minutes, I talked to a representative who informed me (rather tersely) Give-N-Go shirts are not intended to be worn alone and should be worn under another shirt.

'Adventure' t-shirts that are expensive, fragile, and have a limited use case? Disappointing.

DJM
I'm not surprised. Some of the "adventure" grade clothing is a joke. I have an ExOfficio bug shirt I bought on sale years ago. It's a good product, but probably in a different class than what you're after.

I've been happy with a few Sierra Designs shirts, but they're no longer being made. Too bad, because they're very comfortable, fairly stylish (think breathable polo shirt), and decently durable. If you're looking for a polo style, some golf shirts might work.

Andrew Skurka has written a positive review of the BD Rhythm Tee. Worth a look if the style or price don't put you off, but it's very lightweight fabric, so durability may not be the best. NuYarn and the like are interesting, and you may shop for that material in different styling to find something a little dressier.
 
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djm68

Observer
Thanks for the heads up on the Black Diamond Rhythm Tee -- that appears to tick all the boxes for my use case. Skurka use case is certainly more rigorous than mine! Will try one out.

Cheers,
DJM
 

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Ovrlnd Rd

Adventurer
I like the regular weight Carhartts and wear them every day ( have over 20 hanging in my closet). A clean pair of jeans, 2 shirts and underwear all fit nicely in a school size backpack so I can make it through an airport without too much hassle. May not be as "stylish" for some that may like hitting the Clubs but then I've never cared about what anyone thought of my style anyway.

I do recommend, for those buying, to get the Central American made shirts. The Asian made ones tend to run smaller in their sizes.
 

perterra

Adventurer
The only Carhartt t-shirts I see that are light weight, non-cotton are these: https://www.carhartt.com/products/carhartt-men-shirts/Force-Extremes-Short-Sleeve-T-Shirt-102960

Have your tried that style? Being fully synthetic, does it get stinky?

Thanks,
DJM
Sorry, I couldn't tell you. I dont do the synthetics. In my line of work I spend a lot of time in areas with lots of arcs and sparks and the synthetics are persona non grata . Personally I have found synthetics less comfortable than 100% cotton in extreme Texas heat, the only advantage is they dry quick when washed in a motel bathroom sink.

Ovrlnd rd above nailed it, buy the central American regular weight. May not be dapper enough but they wear forever.
 

djm68

Observer
Thanks for the tips on the Carhartt shirts, but cotton is not going to work for my for travel (too long to dry), I'll take a look at those for day-day no travel wear. My trip is two weeks long and I am looking to bring minimal clothes, so they need to dry really fast. No need to be dapper, I'm 50, don't do clubs! My line of work includes computers and meetings! I am a big fan of Carhartt shorts -- the ripstop cargo shorts are my staple for some years and are super durable.

DJM
 

perterra

Adventurer
Thanks for the tips on the Carhartt shirts, but cotton is not going to work for my for travel (too long to dry), I'll take a look at those for day-day no travel wear. My trip is two weeks long and I am looking to bring minimal clothes, so they need to dry really fast. No need to be dapper, I'm 50, don't do clubs! My line of work includes computers and meetings! I am a big fan of Carhartt shorts -- the ripstop cargo shorts are my staple for some years and are super durable.

DJM
Dont take this wrong, but its amazing the world has survived all the eons without microfibers
 

djm68

Observer
Dont take this wrong, but its amazing the world has survived all the eons without microfibers
Lol. No offense taken in the least! I am actually more of fan of natural fibers and based on my recent experience with the crap Give-N-Go I am back to wool and cottons. I realize there is this whole 'light and fast' outdoorsy thing that is more fashion that function. I am a 'disabled' (?) adventurer and I have to carry all my kit on my back wherever I go...on crutches. One trip, where I planned a diving excursion in the Mediterranean following business in London -- my pack was 40lbs. That was a bitch to haul, so I am simply looking to lighten up my load.

DJM


524144
 

perterra

Adventurer
Lol. No offense taken in the least! I am actually more of fan of natural fibers and based on my recent experience with the crap Give-N-Go I am back to wool and cottons. I realize there is this whole 'light and fast' outdoorsy thing that is more fashion that function. I am a 'disabled' (?) adventurer and I have to carry all my kit on my back wherever I go...on crutches. One trip, where I planned a diving excursion in the Mediterranean following business in London -- my pack was 40lbs. That was a bitch to haul, so I am simply looking to lighten up my load.

DJM


View attachment 524144
I see you got a limb missing, but I would be hesitant to call you disabled. Your in a place where a lot of fully functioning folks probably would not go. More power to you. I suspect you will accomplish most of what you wish to accomplish in life.
 

shade

Well-known member
Lol. No offense taken in the least! I am actually more of fan of natural fibers and based on my recent experience with the crap Give-N-Go I am back to wool and cottons. I realize there is this whole 'light and fast' outdoorsy thing that is more fashion that function. I am a 'disabled' (?) adventurer and I have to carry all my kit on my back wherever I go...on crutches. One trip, where I planned a diving excursion in the Mediterranean following business in London -- my pack was 40lbs. That was a bitch to haul, so I am simply looking to lighten up my load.

DJM


View attachment 524144
'Tis but a scratch. Good on ya.

Light is fine as long as it still meets your other goals. Andrew Skurka turned away from the MegaSuperUltralight ethos when he realized there is such a thing as "stupid light", but he still promotes the idea of watching weight, and keeping a simple kit. Over the years, I've shed significant weight from my pack by learning to do more with less, and selecting items that aren't over engineered for the job. It sure makes for more comfortable travel, and I've found it easy to cover much more ground when I'm not needlessly humping a big pack.
 

djm68

Observer
Thank you both for the words and, honestly, I do not identify as 'disabled' but rather 'other-abled'. As noted, I do tons of stuff 'abled bodied' folks don't do.

Great link about 'stupid light' -- became familiar with the term when I went through a stupid-light-phase while building a mountain bike years back. Cut down bars that were too narrow, uncomfortable seat, fragile tires with too little tread, fragile wheels, etc...

Cheers,
DJM
 

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perterra

Adventurer
Thank you both for the words and, honestly, I do not identify as 'disabled' but rather 'other-abled'. As noted, I do tons of stuff 'abled bodied' folks don't do.

Great link about 'stupid light' -- became familiar with the term when I went through a stupid-light-phase while building a mountain bike years back. Cut down bars that were too narrow, uncomfortable seat, fragile tires with too little tread, fragile wheels, etc...

Cheers,
DJM
I'd say inconvenienced more than disabled. Seriously, I know you are having to really expend some effort for the things you do, and I hope your attitude is contagious.
 

Todd n Natalie

Observer
I like the regular weight Carhartts and wear them every day ( have over 20 hanging in my closet). A clean pair of jeans, 2 shirts and underwear all fit nicely in a school size backpack so I can make it through an airport without too much hassle. May not be as "stylish" for some that may like hitting the Clubs but then I've never cared about what anyone thought of my style anyway.

I do recommend, for those buying, to get the Central American made shirts. The Asian made ones tend to run smaller in their sizes.
Huh. I thought Carhartts were made in the USA with a life time warranty. Guess I thought wrong.
 
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