Electric Chain Saw???

leeleatherwood

Active member
Since I already own Milwaukee tools (1/2 impact, Impact Driver, Drill, 3/8 Ratchet) and keep them in my vehicle, it makes sense for me to add the Milwaukee M18 Chainsaw too keep standardized batteries and chargers. Started looking up reviews on this thing and its a freakin BEAST. 16" Bar, built in chain luber thingamabob, battery lasts forever, etc. I dont see any downsides? (Besides maybe cost)

I LOVE my other Milwaukee tools.

 

Doug Moreland

New member
I've been trying to talk myself into buying a chain saw for years...just can't do it. Hauling the saw + gas + oil + tools for something I only need once each year seems like a lot of work.

But, yesterday I saw one of the new electric Stihl saws . Anybody tried one? I think this might be what I need. Small, light, easy to use. Some research suggests that the saw with two charged batteries would get through a reasonable one or two night trips. I don't require a whole lot of fire wood. Might want to cut a tree out of the road here and there.

Or, do I just need to bite the bullet and buy a gas saw? I'd be interested to hear thoughts from those with experience.
I use the Stihl msa200c with two batteries. The battery will last as long as a tank on the comparable gas version and has as much power or more. I’m a big fan and carry it on all our camping trips... it’s also quiet, so if you are at a campground and need a little wood, most people won’t even hear or recognize what you’re up to. 😉
 

geojag

Member
Since I already own Milwaukee tools (1/2 impact, Impact Driver, Drill, 3/8 Ratchet) and keep them in my vehicle, it makes sense for me to add the Milwaukee M18 Chainsaw too keep standardized batteries and chargers. Started looking up reviews on this thing and its a freakin BEAST. 16" Bar, built in chain luber thingamabob, battery lasts forever, etc. I dont see any downsides? (Besides maybe cost)

I LOVE my other Milwaukee tools.
I picked one up, also because I am heavily invested in the Milwaukee M18 line of tools. I can easily cut more than enough wood for a weekend on one of the big 12ah batteries and still have half battery life. That is hardwood and I like big fires.

The downside is that it takes a lot of space because of the motor/battery/handle configuration. I take the bar off and keep it in a duffle bag with a quart of bar oil and a spare chain.
 

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mobydick 11

Active member
Last weekend I used my Stihl battery saw to remove a tree from the road (in order to get to one of my favorite camp sites). Gotta say that my "Testosterone Footprint" has increased dramatically.

Even though I've been storing it with the blade removed, it didn't take but a few minutes to install the blade, chain, and go to work.

For reference, yesterday I went camping with the family (old fashioned lumberjacks). Dad spent 30 minutes getting his gas-powered Stihl out, messing around with it, adding oil & gas, etc. In the end he said, "Sh!t, it's leaking gas"...and then he continued to screw around for a while.

When it finally started he proceeded to "fell" the tree. There was 10 minutes spent mid-cut while he yanked on that pull. Saw wasn't working for whatever reason. Eventually the saw started and he fell the tree.

So, real-life experience. For occasional wood work, gas saws are a ridiculously complicated waste of time and life. Period. Absolute statement.

Anyone that says otherwise if full of sh!t and has a gas-powered saw. ;)
Hi Jacob ,I do not see you posting anymore ?? I hope that some of the insulting things people say has not turned you off of sharing with us . I am sure many of us enjoy following you builds . You had talked about starting a van build ,don't know if I missed it or you are not posting .Anyway hope all is well and you are having fun .
 

jacobconroy

Hillbilly of Leisure
Hi Jacob ,I do not see you posting anymore ?? I hope that some of the insulting things people say has not turned you off of sharing with us . I am sure many of us enjoy following you builds . You had talked about starting a van build ,don't know if I missed it or you are not posting .Anyway hope all is well and you are having fun .
Hi,
I've been off on a tangent playing with semi-custom 1911 pistols (since I traded my AT Chaser for a handful of them), but it's gotten cold outside and I am getting ready to start the van build again.

Yes, there are some "bags with which one douches" on the forum, but there are more good people than not. Who cares what the DBs have to say anyway? That's what the ignore feature is for (and I use it). ;)

There is a link to the van build in my signature and there should be a lot of activity in that build this year. My parents gave me the Honda TR200 that I used to ride as a kid but I have no way to haul it since the Jeep is already overloaded. This means it's time to commit to the van. I'm kindof excited because the van and the bike are the same age, lol.

Thanks for the thoughts. I'll be back!
 

billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
At 65 I decided to give up finding my own firewood and now buy it thru our Community Services Job Training Program.
Altho I miss this..
DSC_0209.jpeg

and sold my gas chainsaw I still need to deal with this.
DSC_0112.JPG

So I am in the market for a cordless electric. Still shopping but I'm pretty much settled on a Stihl.
Which will also power a new lawn mower, hedge trimmer and whipper snipper.
ebfbc7ad1cab41d19f8bda0057b7434a.jpg

I live in a logging town and several of the fallers have the gasless Stihl and say it'll do everything I need.
I am definitely looking forward to keeping it in the cab of my Jeep 24/7 and having it start "first pull".
 
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mobydick 11

Active member
Thanks Jacob ,got caught up on the van build . Had a couple good laughs along the way .That is a neat van ,did you say 460 ? Had one of them back in the day ,hardest thing I have ever owned on gas .
 

billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
Thanks Jacob ,got caught up on the van build . Had a couple good laughs along the way .That is a neat van ,did you say 460 ? Had one of them back in the day ,hardest thing I have ever owned on gas .
I must say, my F350 dump, cab and chassis with 4WD, a 460, 5speed and duals got better mileage than my TJR gets towing 2000 pounds.
 

MapJunkie

New member
I bought a Stihl electric saw and have loved it. I can carry it in the cab of my pickup and I don’t get gas fumes. With a couple of batteries, I can cut way more wood than I need in weeklong trips. Plus, I can charge the batteries as I drive.
 

jacobconroy

Hillbilly of Leisure
Thanks Jacob ,got caught up on the van build . Had a couple good laughs along the way .That is a neat van ,did you say 460 ? Had one of them back in the day ,hardest thing I have ever owned on gas .
Yup, 460. The MPG checking I did was about 13 but I'm not quite sure I believe that. I'm going to start using the van for going to the range each week and will keep an eye on it.
 
Over at coyote works. He is using a dual battery makita. In my old jkur I had a 800 watt inverter but could have easily gone bigger. 2000 plus. Just didn’t think it through on how much I used it powered hand drills air pumps and all sorts of small electrical devices. How much wattage is used by a corded saw?
 

billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
Over at coyote works. He is using a dual battery makita. In my old jkur I had a 800 watt inverter but could have easily gone bigger. 2000 plus. Just didn’t think it through on how much I used it powered hand drills air pumps and all sorts of small electrical devices. How much wattage is used by a corded saw?
My old black and decker was 12amp
 

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another_mike

Adventurer
Im having a hard time justifying an electric chainsaw... not because it might not work for my use... but initial cost is more, and maybe a possibility battery type gets updated and the saw is then useless.

Since I already have Makita.. I'm looking at a 16" bar Makita.
From Home Depot:
The saw alone? $299....
A single 5ah battery? $129
The saw with 2 5ah batteries and a double charger? $409
comparo.png

If I buy a single 5ah battery I pay $129..... two 4ah batteries can be had for $100
Twofor99.png

The package which has two 5ah batteries and a double charger $109.... They love selling these tool packs.. I already have two rapid chargers (one of which I never use because I don't need more than one). They can obviously get away with selling 5ah batteries for around $50.. so why charge $129?!?!

I would still need to buy a DC charger for off grid since I have no plan to ever add an inverter to my setup.
dccharger.png

So at minimum Im paying no less than $500 after tax......

Then, Makita is releasing a new series of tools and batteries (20v XGT) and I wonder how long the LXT will truly be around... https://www.makitatools.com/company/press-releases/2019/makita-offers-vision-of-cordless-future-with-expanded-lxt-and-new-xgt . While they say they will continue to "invest heavily" in LXT, I wonder how long before they start pushing me into XGT by stopping LXT support....

For $500 I know I can get a Stihl and be using it in 10 years without worry (with proper maintenance of course)......

Anyway, that's just where Im at with my line of thinking. It may sound like I've talked myself into a Gas saw.. but I haven't. Although the "new standard" that electric tool manufacturers like to push every few years really gets old when you want to purchase something that will last a while and have support for maintenance and repairs.
 

shade

Well-known member
Im having a hard time justifying an electric chainsaw... not because it might not work for my use... but initial cost is more, and maybe a possibility battery type gets updated and the saw is then useless.

Since I already have Makita.. I'm looking at a 16" bar Makita.
From Home Depot:
The saw alone? $299....
A single 5ah battery? $129
The saw with 2 5ah batteries and a double charger? $409
View attachment 561313

If I buy a single 5ah battery I pay $129..... two 4ah batteries can be had for $100
View attachment 561314

The package which has two 5ah batteries and a double charger $109.... They love selling these tool packs.. I already have two rapid chargers (one of which I never use because I don't need more than one). They can obviously get away with selling 5ah batteries for around $50.. so why charge $129?!?!

I would still need to buy a DC charger for off grid since I have no plan to ever add an inverter to my setup.
View attachment 561315

So at minimum Im paying no less than $500 after tax......

Then, Makita is releasing a new series of tools and batteries (20v XGT) and I wonder how long the LXT will truly be around... https://www.makitatools.com/company/press-releases/2019/makita-offers-vision-of-cordless-future-with-expanded-lxt-and-new-xgt . While they say they will continue to "invest heavily" in LXT, I wonder how long before they start pushing me into XGT by stopping LXT support....

For $500 I know I can get a Stihl and be using it in 10 years without worry (with proper maintenance of course)......

Anyway, that's just where Im at with my line of thinking. It may sound like I've talked myself into a Gas saw.. but I haven't. Although the "new standard" that electric tool manufacturers like to push every few years really gets old when you want to purchase something that will last a while and have support for maintenance and repairs.
I think the key to getting the most for your money with cordless tools is to wait for the inevitable sale, if you can. I've bought tools bundled with a battery for the same price as the full retail price of the just the battery.

I'm not sure how good Makita has been about maintaining backward compatibility with their battery systems; DeWalt offers adapters to use new batteries with older tools. Your concern about having an orphaned tool is a valid concern. The same applies to many battery powered devices. Depending on the battery construction, it's possible to rebuild an old battery with new cells, so there's a possibility to keep an old tool running.
 
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