Egads, not another drawers thread!

Hey guys, I hate to add yet another thread on the topic of drawers but I could use some (expert) advice before I commit to making mine. I've got my plan 99% roughed out with the exception of the type of plywood to use. I've been going back and forth between using pressure treated plywood for the whole thing and using pressure treated for just the frame and top sheet with non pressure treated for the drawers themselves.

My main concern would be transfer of the chemicals used to pressure treat the plywood onto my cooking equipment, hence using non treated plywood for the drawers themselves. But on the other hand, I don't know if I'm just overthinking things.

Any advice you could give is much appreciated!

Cheers!
 

ripperj

Explorer
I would not use pressure treated either. I have not had good luck with cheap cabinet grade ply from Depot or Lowes, the veneer layer tends to blow off when making box joints and dados. I would go with Baltic birch, a bit more expensive, but worth it. It's great to work with and requires very little sanding on routed edges. The


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jgaz

Adventurer
I would not use pressure treated either. I have not had good luck with cheap cabinet grade ply from Depot or Lowes, the veneer layer tends to blow off when making box joints and dados. I would go with Baltic birch, a bit more expensive, but worth it. It's great to work with and requires very little sanding on routed edges. The


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^X2!
I've also recently found voids in this material in a number of cases. Buy the Baltic birch and be done with it.
 

ripperj

Explorer
Voids is a good point, I just got done making some drawers for my Alaskan and they came out ok until I rounded the top edges with a 1/4" round over router bit. There were a couple voids with black burn looking marks. I used Depot ply because it's all I had


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rayra

Expedition Leader
zero reason or benefit to use pressure treated. Just use a good grade of sanded plywood if you'll be sanding and painting, or a good baltic birch or similar 'cabinet grade' plywood if you'll be wantign the wood visible or only clearcoated. Whatever you go with, seal the finished work to control moisture issues.
 
Thanks for the input guys! What would be the best way to seal the plywood against moisture? I'd most likely be painting them black, but I assume I'd need to seal the wood before painting the drawers.
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
If you are painting, then I'd suggest something like KILZ oil-based primer. And if you discover any voids in your plywood edges after building / shaping them, using a simple sandable / stainable wood putty will quickly fill things up for a nice finished edge under the paint. A gallon costs about as much as 2 quarts. A drawer project would take about a bit mor ethan a quart, so I suggest buying the Gallon up front. It will keep for a long time if you store it properly. Long enough to use it up, anyway. There are several varieties, I've had good results with both the original oil-based and the latex variant. in fact I used the latex variant as an undercoat on my roof rack deck and it has worked fine so far.


 
Thanks for the input guys! What would you recommend for protecting the top sheet? I was thinking of getting a rubber bed mat from a full size truck second hand and cutting it down to size.
 

PhilActual

Observer
I also used kilz primer on my first drawer system and used about 10 cans of bed liner spray paint. I found that if I had a scratch or a worn spot in the bed liner the white primer would show through. On my second drawer system I used some black spray paint like a primer and rolled the rest with rustoleum bed liner. The finish isn't as nice as the stuff in the can but it's a lot cheaper and durable.
But to answer your question 3/4" birch was my material of choice.
 

greg.potter

Adventurer
The preservative used in pressure treated plywood (chromated copper arsenate) promotes oxidization of ferrous metals - I'd avoid it for that reason. Additionally pressure treated plywood weighs considerably more than regular plywood - I am guessing somewhere between another 25 - 50 percent.
 

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