Eco-Roamer - F650 based Expedition Vehicle

upcruiser

Perpetual Transient
Jay, it was really cool having the Eco Roamer along on the trip this weekend. It really does seem bigger in real life then the photos show. I was bringing up the caboose of the vehicle train Saturday (following Jay) and was stopped several times by bewildered folks in the woods wondering what the thing was. I would explain the best I could and all they would do is stare at me with an empty gaze, then basically say, "I don't get it." haha

Anyway, I think the trip was a good shakedown for him as he really put it through its paces on some rough and tight terrain. I give Jay some major credit for not being afraid of squeezing it through a few spots. I witnessed rear tires leaving the ground several times. Anyway, here's a some shots of it and a short clip made by another forum member following it out of camp.



 
Having the Eco Roamer at our event was like having a special guest star show up. I hope it ended up being a productive test trip for you. It was nice meeting you and your family.

 
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5x5

Observer
:iagree:

Plus, the margaritas and chicken wings were great. :chowtime: Any chance you could post the chicken marinade, as I didn't write it down. Thanks, Ian
 

Mickldo

Adventurer
Great build. Cheers.

I am a foreman at a fabrication shop and we make fully enclosed race car trailers, among other things. We use a full aluminium chassis and framework and then sheet it using Di-Bond. We used to use the Alucobond but we found the Di-Bond is available in a greater variety of colours, sizes and thicknesses.

To attach the sheets we use 3M double sided tape. We got the idea from an aluminium, double decker, prototype train we were asked to build for one of the rail mobs here. Apparently it is widely used in the train industry to attach the sides of the trains. It is very simple to apply and once it goes on there is not much chance of it ever coming off. It allows us to build the trailers without any holes for rivets in the sheets for water to leak in past. Well at least in the middle of the sheets, we still rivet the corner capping on using structural rivets.

Seeing your torsional testing is very interesting. Can't wait to see the rest of the build.
 

jayshapiro

Adventurer
Quick Update

Hi All,

Thanks for your great comments, and thanks to those who posted up pics from our fantastic weekend in the U.P. Michigan. (Thanks Kristian!)

We have spent the past weeks taking the truck out for it's first 'shakedown' trip and it has performed incredibly well overall. (on some pretty tough trails)

We're up in Canada at the moment and haven't had a lot of internet access, hence the lack of posts -- sorry!

However, we're connect again now using our snazzy new "Internet In Motion" system - read about it here!

Over the next week or so, I'll post various updates on the different 'bits' of the truck. In short though:

a) the dynamic body mount performed perfectly. If you've watched the video of us trailing near copper harbour you'll see how the camper was rocking back and forth on it's own - here. (Thanks Jason!)

b) nothing leaked - through torrential rain and substantial dust, the interior stayed dry and clean.

c) We're still running on the highway duallies (not the Conti MPT81's yet) but for the moment we're getting 8-10MPG which (combined with the 125Gal fuel capacity) gives us almost 1,000 mile range - taking some of the bite out of the fuel prices. So far we've only found one BioDiesel station - they don't seem to have them in Canada?!?

I'll be driving the vehicle back to Sturgis, Michingan this week and then comes the job of fitting the interior, the electrical system (including the solar panels), and the plumbing.

In the meantime, here are a couple of quick shots to show you what we've been up to:


Taking a break on the trail in Keweena, MI


Posing for the group shot at the ExPo U.P. weekend


Fitting the side tent before leaving Sturgis


A very happy Mrs. EcoRoamer - Hey, it only took 3 years to get here!

Stay tuned, there's lot's more adventure to come - but in the mean time: "It works!"

Cheers,
Jay.
 

jayshapiro

Adventurer
Gluey Goop

Mickldo said:
To attach the sheets we use 3M double sided tape. We got the idea from an aluminium, double decker, prototype train we were asked to build for one of the rail mobs here. Apparently it is widely used in the train industry to attach the sides of the trains. It is very simple to apply and once it goes on there is not much chance of it ever coming off. It allows us to build the trailers without any holes for rivets in the sheets for water to leak in past. Well at least in the middle of the sheets, we still rivet the corner capping on using structural rivets.
Thanks.

We took a very similar approach. The Alucobond is attached using a BASF single-part "Degabond" adhesive that comes in caulking-type tube. It goes on easy and allows a bit of time to move the sheet around a little bit to get it exactly right before it sets.

Once it is set there is great torsional and separational strength. We played around with it on some samples pieces first and COULD NOT get them separated through all sorts of improper means.

Similar to yours, this one is used for Aluminum aircraft assembly.

So far it has held up with no problem - I'll let you know in 10 years if it's still doing the job!

Cheers,
Jay.
 

egn

Adventurer
Most of the people here in Europe use Sikaflex 252 or other variants with high ultra violett resistance or higher strength to build their cabins. This is also used a lot for boats.

This polyurethane adhesive has a strength of 4 N/mm² (569 lb/sq.inch). This bonds like hell and it is easy to work with. You need primer for some materials. The only chance to separate bonded parts without damage is to heat the glue and then cut.

This seems to be similar to Degabond.
 
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jayshapiro said:
c) We're still running on the highway duallies (not the Conti MPT81's yet) but for the moment we're getting 8-10MPG which (combined with the 125Gal fuel capacity) gives us almost 1,000 mile range.
Jay.
Maybe you should carry a jerry can or two just to be safe. Just kidding.
 

spencyg

This Space For Rent
egn said:
Most of the people here in Europe use Sikaflex 252 or other variants with high ultra violett resistance or higher strength to build their cabins. This is also used a lot for boats.

This polyurethane adhesive has a strength of 4 N/mm² (569 lb/sq.inch). This bonds like hell and it is easy to work with. You need primer for some materials. The only chance to separate bonded parts without damage is to heat the glue and then cut.

This seems to be similar to Degabond.
Sika products are available here, and 3M has an amazing bonding agent called 5200. It takes a couple days to set up and cure, but once it does, you will NEVER seperate the components which you joined. Never. Actually, one needs to be very careful with its use because if you glue down a component which eventually requires replacement or repair, you'll end up doing tons of damage removing it. For gluing together a camper though, I can't think of anything better.

Spence
 

capterik

New member
spencyg said:
Sika products are available here, and 3M has an amazing bonding agent called 5200. It takes a couple days to set up and cure, but once it does, you will NEVER seperate the components which you joined. Never. Actually, one needs to be very careful with its use because if you glue down a component which eventually requires replacement or repair, you'll end up doing tons of damage removing it. For gluing together a camper though, I can't think of anything better.

Spence
They actually make a product called debond , which will remove 5200 really well, but it does do a good job at holding things together.
 

spencyg

This Space For Rent
Hadn't heard of Debond....nice to know. My version has always been a putty knife and propane torch :)

Spence
 
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