E-bike or motorcycle for secondary vehicle

Photobug

Well-known member
I have a tandem and as much as I’ve racked my brain I cannot figure out how to electrify it. I’ve build 6 bikes now and encourage you guys to do one. It is a game changer and so much fun. The range is insane and actually more than I want to ride most trips. I have an old Bridgestone mb1 I got in college that may get the next setup. Hard tails are perfect. I use my 8 speed townie the most. The 1up rack is tested by the weight and it is above my aluminess rack on the back of the van. Kinda scary 6 feet up.


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Have you had any problems converting any bike? My old college Mtn Bike is so old it does not even have a sealed bearing which appears is part of the preferred setup.

I think the thing is about 29lbs+ probably more with fenders, rack etc. I would think being as heavy as it is it is built like a tank but still worried if it would hold up to the torque of an electric motor. My biggest concern with the older bikes I am considering is the braking system. Older brakes were a nightmare to get right, I also feel a better braking system might be called for with the potential higher speeds. There was a bike rental place around the corner from me that was selling off last summer's inventory. I reached out to them to see what they have left. Maybe a slightly newer bike with disk brakes might be a better platform?
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Right now the CRF 250s are plentiful used, they have been made for years. If you want a CRF 300 L which I just discovered myself and think it might be a perfect fit for me, better get in line. There is a waiting list for spring deliveries. I have my name on a waiting list and will call the other shops to put my name on there as well. One is for sale at a premium on the Utah KSL classifieds.



I'd agree there is a good number of older CRF 250's out there but, I'm staying away from anything pre 2014 due to the whole valve issue and any other 250 models that don't meet my need. I recently had to pass on a 300 mile, 2017 250x due to the guy never titled it and still only had the CO certificate in his name/date of purchase, so someone (not me) was going to have to pay some taxes on it. I like the 300L, but its approx. 50-60 lbs heavier (depending on where you look) then the 250x and that could be an issue on the trail or on the carrier.
The good news is I just got back from buying a couple of inflatable kayaks so at least thats done!
 
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Photobug

Well-known member
I'd agree there is a good number of older CRF 250's out there but, I'm staying away from anything pre 2014 due to the whole valve issue and any other 250 models that don't meet my need. I recently had to pass on a 300 mile, 2017 250x due to the guy never titled it and still only had the CO certificate in his name/date of purchase, so someone (not me) was going to have to pay some taxes on it. I like the 300L, but its approx. 50-60 lbs heavier (depending on where you look) then the 250x and that could be an issue on the trail or on the carrier.
That is some great info. I am often looking at used because I am just cheap that way. However as I crunch the numbers. Saving 50-60% for a used boat or RV where that means 10s or 100s thousands of dollars I am willing to do some elbow grease or take a little risk. When used bikes are $3-5k and new are $6k, I have come to the conclusion a new CRF300L would be a good investment. The 50-60 lbs difference though of the 250x would benefit my Van and myself likely when I am learning to ride. I will start looking at those as well.

The good news is I just got back from buying a couple of inflatable kayaks so at least thats done!
One of our main summer fun is on the water and our favorite vehicle is our inflatable kayak and having a motorcycle or E-bike would make the whole process of shuttling so much easier. What kind of kayaks did you get?
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
That is some great info. I am often looking at used because I am just cheap that way. However as I crunch the numbers. Saving 50-60% for a used boat or RV where that means 10s or 100s thousands of dollars I am willing to do some elbow grease or take a little risk. When used bikes are $3-5k and new are $6k, I have come to the conclusion a new CRF300L would be a good investment. The 50-60 lbs difference though of the 250x would benefit my Van and myself likely when I am learning to ride. I will start looking at those as well.



One of our main summer fun is on the water and our favorite vehicle is our inflatable kayak and having a motorcycle or E-bike would make the whole process of shuttling so much easier. What kind of kayaks did you get?
One additional issue with the 250x is it's height. They're a tall bike. Make sure to sit on one first to make sure it's not too tall which can become an issue off-road. Good luck!

I found a couple of new/used Aquaglide Rogue kayaks. They no longer make them but I wanted them due to their wide, stable and open stern design. The open stern allows for much easier reboarding if you dump it or just want to go swimming. Also has a couple of fishing rod holders and made with removable/repairable HD polyester covers that cover the 3 chamber tubes. They also fold down compactly enough so I can sew a carrying pack to carry them on the moto when shuttling back to the Tiger.

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Photobug

Well-known member
One additional issue with the 250x is it's height. They're a tall bike. Make sure to sit on one first to
Then that is out for me. I am 5'10" with a 29" inseam. My wife is 5'2" and our legs are about the same length. So I am on the search for a bike for stubby legged people or one that can be lowered to fit me.

We have a 3 person inflatable, which makes it nice for solo or a couple with two dogs or a 3rd person. Even though we have plenty of other boats we use the inflatables or SUP the most.
 

Vandiesel

Member
Have you had any problems converting any bike? My old college Mtn Bike is so old it does not even have a sealed bearing which appears is part of the preferred setup.

I think the thing is about 29lbs+ probably more with fenders, rack etc. I would think being as heavy as it is it is built like a tank but still worried if it would hold up to the torque of an electric motor. My biggest concern with the older bikes I am considering is the braking system. Older brakes were a nightmare to get right, I also feel a better braking system might be called for with the potential higher speeds. There was a bike rental place around the corner from me that was selling off last summer's inventory. I reached out to them to see what they have left. Maybe a slightly newer bike with disk brakes might be a better platform?
I’ve not had conversion issues but had to switch plans on that epic shown above. Carbon fiber is thick and the bafang is an integrated bottom bracket and motor that slides in with the motor hanging below out front. With carbon it’s too thick to allow it to slide in. I think there is like 9mm of space so no go. The CYC was unknown to me at the time or maybe not on the market. When I found it I was so excited and jumped on it. With the smaller option now it is about as perfect a platform as I’ve seen. Mid drive is by far the best way to go IMHO. Electrify Bike in Salt Lake will help you sort it out. I highly encourage everyone to try it. A home made ebike is great and it is very satisfying to give new life to an old friend.


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Photobug

Well-known member
Mid drive is by far the best way to go IMHO. Electrify Bike in Salt Lake will help you sort it out. I highly encourage everyone to try it. A home made ebike is great and it is very satisfying to give new life to an old friend.
That is my plan is to get a setup from Electrify Bike. We had looked at E-bikes but had trouble deciding which make or model. I like the idea of buying a setup from them and be able to move it from bike to bike. My wife will get one for X-mas for us to start off and check out how an e-bike works for us. I was going to put them on her older 90s Trek hardtail. A bike rental place near me had some gravel bikes for sale for $300/ea. They are shut down for the season but I sent them an email to see if they still have any left as I think any e-bike will benefit from disk brakes.
 

RoamIt

Active member
I think you're on target about the disk brakes, with the potential for more speed, given the weight of the bike/rider combo going down hill, in the wet, etc.

I did a century this year with some significant down hill sections (with curve's!), I hit 40mph. That doesn't sound fast, but I assure you going that fast downhill with rim brakes gets your attention.
 

F350joe

Well-known member
That is my plan is to get a setup from Electrify Bike. We had looked at E-bikes but had trouble deciding which make or model. I like the idea of buying a setup from them and be able to move it from bike to bike. My wife will get one for X-mas for us to start off and check out how an e-bike works for us. I was going to put them on her older 90s Trek hardtail. A bike rental place near me had some gravel bikes for sale for $300/ea. They are shut down for the season but I sent them an email to see if they still have any left as I think any e-bike will benefit from disk brakes.
Hard tail ebike can be a rough ride on dirt with all the weight. Some will go with more rubber but that rolling resistance kills range in dirt. I found the ability to carry cargo is important when using an ebike as an overland dingy so hardtail is better for hauling. Run what you brung, you have it figured out for the most part, but think mid drive full suspension with a lock out for the rear shock in the future. Mid drive also means you can remove the wheels with a quick release. Also, make the battery removable and get two so one can sit on the solar charger or put in the cab to reduce weight on the rack. The most power and biggest batteries you can afford will reduce range anxiety and eat hills, low range and low power bikes can be really frustrating. No matter what you do it will probably be your favorite accessory on trips.
 

Photobug

Well-known member
Hard tail ebike can be a rough ride on dirt with all the weight. Some will go with more rubber but that rolling resistance kills range in dirt. I found the ability to carry cargo is important when using an ebike as an overland dingy so hardtail is better for hauling. Run what you brung, you have it figured out for the most part, but think mid drive full suspension with a lock out for the rear shock in the future. Mid drive also means you can remove the wheels with a quick release. Also, make the battery removable and get two so one can sit on the solar charger or put in the cab to reduce weight on the rack. The most power and biggest batteries you can afford will reduce range anxiety and eat hills, low range and low power bikes can be really frustrating. No matter what you do it will probably be your favorite accessory on trips.
I own everything from a folder to a full suspension 26" Stumpjumper. Whatever I put this on will be adjusted as needed, meaning I will likely install a motor on our most simple bike but one day try it out on our full suspension to see how much fun that is. I foresee having a bunch of toys to take with us as we see the need when traveling. I really like your scooter, had a ton of fun on scooters when we rented them.
 
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