Dry fire for improving shooting accuracy

Kmrtnsn

Explorer
Are you familiar with the concept of "riding the reset"? Frankly, it's the biggest reason for large and inconsistent group sizes. Squeeze the trigger, do not let up when the gun fires, feel the tactile resetting of the trigger as you slowly and under control, let pressure off the trigger. STOP at this point and then regain your sight picture and squeeze again for your next shot. Your follow-up shots will be more consistent and exponentially faster once you master it. Feeling the reset and understanding the mechanisms at play is easily done during dry fire.
 
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lilkia

Active member
Lighten up, he was making a joke. Seriously you have a (commie) caliber as your username like youre some awesome gunslinger and youre calling other people out?

For those wanting real practice, take an empty piece of brass and balance it on the end of the barrel. Youll know your trigger pull is good if you dont drop the brass. If you can do it with an SA or DA youve really got it down.
 

1leglance

2007 Expedition Trophy Champion, Overland Certifie
Are you familiar with the concept of "riding the reset"? Frankly, it's the biggest reason for large and inconsistent group sizes. Squeeze the trigger, do not let up when the gun fires, feel the tactile resetting of the trigger as you slowly and under control, let pressure off the trigger. STOP at this point and then regain your sight picture and squeeze again for your next shot. Your follow-up shots will be more consistent and exponentially faster once you master it. Feeling the reset and understanding the mechanisms at play is easily done during dry fire.
Weeelllll for the most part this is true and valid advice....Up till you are trying to go really really fast like my son and I do in competition.
If you try for the "reset" trigger feel action when you are at 0.2 splits you might get trigger freeze or a failure to reset. There is only so fast your finger can move back, while feeling for reset then pull forward, and 0.2 is about the edge.
So take the above advice and understand it and try it but know that as you go faster between shots you will need to make sure you are seeing your front sight rise and fall.

We put in time dry firing for draw, for movement and for reloads. Just make sure you are not training yourself to be a 1 shot wonder. Since dry fire usually only allows 1 shot then you need to reset (depending on your pistol) then you can train yourself to only do 1 shot.
In our glocks we will sometimes put a bit of wide rubber band in the ejector area which keeps a glock out of battery and lets you get many trigger squeezes. The key to this is that your front sight doesn't wobble around shot to shot.
 

Payback

Imperial Pilot
I used to be a competitive shooter and still do alright at the range. My targets where the rounds don't end up in the 10 ring are usually because I tightened my grip and shot over to the right at about the 4 o'clock position. You seem to be an asshole that is full of yourself. Add something useful to the discussion. By the way, dry-firing and calling your shot is a very productive exercise.

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jadmt

Well-known member
sometimes guns are just easy to shoot. I am old and shaky and can't hit the broad side of the barn. I bought a G42 pea shooter and these were the first rounds thru it at 7 yards. I dry fired it a couple of times just to see how the trigger felt. I would like to see someone's group who can actually shoot.
 
Something I was taught by one of our instructors for live fire is to load dummy rounds in the magazine with live rounds, 2-3 at random. This sure helps me break the anticipation habit that seems to creep in on me.
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Something I was taught by one of our instructors for live fire is to load dummy rounds in the magazine with live rounds, 2-3 at random. This sure helps me break the anticipation habit that seems to creep in on me.
Also teaches you how to fix your gun during a fire fight. Well done.
 

PPCLI_Jim

Adventurer
Seriously? Wow I'm glad I live up in Canadaland. Where very few Polar bears and Mooses [Mices?] try to shoot us, so I don't have to worry as much.
 

Modeler

W1DCS
An FTF is an FTF and knowing how to/practicing how to clear and in battery the firearm as quickly as possible is just good business.
 
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