Does the 2007 V6 4Runner have enough power

Galexc

New member
Hello all,

This is my first post and I promise I tried to go through the other threads to see if this question has already been answered. If I missed it I apologize in advance.

I have a 2007 SR5 4runner with the 4.0 v6. I want to start modifying so I can do some backcountry traveling this summer. I would like to add a 3" lift, 275/70/17, front bumper with winch, rear bumper with swing out tire carrier, on board air compressor, and a roof top tent. All told this is going to add about 700LBS to the vehicle. What I was wondering is if anyone has done something similar and noticed a significant decrease in power with the bigger tires and added weight. I know that my MPG will decrease but even though I will be spending a lot of time in the backcountry I still have to get there on the highways.

I have seen a ton of people mod their V8s but not many V6.

I really would appreciate any input.

Thanks!
 

phsycle

Adventurer
You should be ok but you will definitely feel that extra heft.

By the way, you can do your backcountry travel without every single one of those mods. Maybe none of them, depending where you’re going. Don’t fall victim to Instagram overloading standards.
 

gmtech

Observer
700 lbs... how much do you weight? that's like asking can my 4runner carry 4 "normal weight Americans at 250lbs each" for 1000lbs.

I had a 2004 4runner v6 once hauled 4 guys all our ******** stacked to the roof in the rear and 3 bikes on the back 14 hours to Colorado bone stock. and then over some easy passes. and it had 190k on it when it happened … no problem!
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
This is a subjective question, so I don't think you're going to get binary answers. We had a 2005 4Runner and found the power completely sufficient.

But my frame of reference at the time was a 4 cylinder 1991 with a stick shift and she was coming from a base model Civic. So it seemed downright powerful to us. OTOH they offered a V8 in the 4th gen 4Runner probably because the market demanded it.

I still drive a 4.0L V6 truck and find the power completely acceptable but plenty of people on forums complain about it being under powered. It is certainly not a 5.0L F150 in power, so it's a matter of expectation.

I'll never mistake mine for a race truck but it does fine. But my Tacoma has a stick shift (this is not insignificant IMO) and my tire size is still reasonable. I think it's more going too big on tires that really causes these trucks to struggle, so staying in the 31" to smaller 32" sizes I think is important unless you plan on a re-gear.
 

Galexc

New member
700 lbs... how much do you weight? that's like asking can my 4runner carry 4 "normal weight Americans at 250lbs each" for 1000lbs.

I had a 2004 4runner v6 once hauled 4 guys all our ******** stacked to the roof in the rear and 3 bikes on the back 14 hours to Colorado bone stock. and then over some easy passes. and it had 190k on it when it happened … no problem!
Thank you!

I never thought of it that way, I know that sounds pretty stupid but you are absolutely right!
 

Watt maker

Active member
I have a 2008 4runner with the 4.0, 33’s, bumper/winch, decent amount of recovery gear/first aid/survival gear in the back. It’s not a race truck but I don’t have a problem with the amount of power the 4.0 makes. Out of all the things I’ve added to it, the steel bumper and warn winch with steel cable had the most impact on perceived power and actual mpg. It still takes us where we want to go. Honestly, it feels like it has twice the HP of my 5th gen 4runner. I’ve towed the boat and my flatbed trailer loaded with Jeeps, hay, wood, metal, you name it on there and the little v6 in the 4th gen just keeps chugging along. No, not the same power band as my Tundra but I’ve been impressed by it. We mostly use ours for backcountry travel now and it still has plenty of power for that. I think I would probably re-gear it if/when I upgrade to 35’s on there. On the other hand, I may pick up a 2nd gen Tacoma to build up because I like the 4.0 v6 so much. I think yours will do just fine.
 

lugueto

Adventurer
700 lbs... how much do you weight? that's like asking can my 4runner carry 4 "normal weight Americans at 250lbs each" for 1000lbs.

I had a 2004 4runner v6 once hauled 4 guys all our ******** stacked to the roof in the rear and 3 bikes on the back 14 hours to Colorado bone stock. and then over some easy passes. and it had 190k on it when it happened … no problem!
Well, this is logic reasoning as well as completely flawed simply because he's adding 700lbs to the unloaded weight. To that you have to add the 4 "normal weight americans" for 1000lbs plus gear. That's when things start to get really heavy. The vehicle will obviously be able to move 1700lbs, but deciding if its doable, acceptable or safe depends on the owner. Also, it will depend on your country's/state's laws.

IMO the 4Runner, as well as most 1GR Toyotas, have plenty of power. I've used a BUNCH of 1GR platforms and neither one has felt sluggish. The stock 4th gen 4Runner has been without question the fastest of the bunch. Love to drive that truck. I can't speak for modified 4th gens as mine only has 32s and a 1in leveling kit. I consider it a fast & powerful rig and engine.
 

skrypj

Member
You should be ok but you will definitely feel that extra heft.

By the way, you can do your backcountry travel without every single one of those mods. Maybe none of them, depending where you’re going. Don’t fall victim to Instagram overloading standards.
Wait a minute. Wait . . . a . . . minute.

Are you saying I don't need to be SAS'd on 40" swampers with lockers to go offroad?
 

skrypj

Member
I have a 1995 4Runner with a 22RE on 33x10.5" tires, SAS, winch, winch bumper, sliders, compressor, roof rack, etc and probably 4" of lift. That 22RE was rated for 110hp at sea level. I live at 6500' so I estimate its making ~90 hp or less here. It does fine. It will slow on huge climbs to around 57-58 mph but in general it will roll along fine at 65-70mph.

Any truck with 150 hp or more can likely maintain freeway speeds most anywhere. Anything above and beyond that is just about convenience unless you are towing too.
 

alanymarce

Well-known member
Well, this is logic reasoning as well as completely flawed simply because he's adding 700lbs to the unloaded weight. To that you have to add the 4 "normal weight americans" for 1000lbs plus gear. That's when things start to get really heavy. The vehicle will obviously be able to move 1700lbs, but deciding if its doable, acceptable or safe depends on the owner. Also, it will depend on your country's/state's laws.
The payload on the vehicle is 1285 lb (GVM is 5330). So 1700 lb is not going to be possible (at least without exceeding the GVM which I assume is illegal in most places.

OP plans to add 700 lb with all this stuff, so will be able to carry 585 lb of people, luggage, fuel, etc. Assuming that the question is "how much will the additional 700 lb affect the performance" the comparison (same people/kit/fuel/etc., in both cases) is the difference between a total mass of 4630 lb and 5330 lb, which is an increase of 15%.

The power doesn't change however the power/weight ratio does - by 15%. So the question is whether a 15% change in power/weight ratio is going to be:

a) noticeable - yes

b) too much for the vehicle (standard power is 236 HP I think) - it's effectively as if the power available has reduced to ~200 HP - this is more than adequate for overland travel so my answer is that it's not going to present a problem.
 

BigSwede

The Credible Hulk
My previous rig (95 Trooper) had 175 hp... and 35s, bumper, winch, sliders, rear bumper with swingout... never felt underpowered mainly because I regeared it to regain a near stock final drive ratio.
 

BlairB

Observer
I have a build very similar to what you are thinking of doing (minus the RTT) and I will echo what others say about you feeling the weight. That being said it is totally doable, although you could benefit from regearing (I have 255/80/17's and have been putting it off for too long).



 

Watt maker

Active member
I have a build very similar to what you are thinking of doing (minus the RTT) and I will echo what others say about you feeling the weight. That being said it is totally doable, although you could benefit from regearing (I have 255/80/17's and have been putting it off for too long).



Happy to see this 4runner still hitting the trails! I remember it from the forums years ago.
 

BlairB

Observer
Happy to see this 4runner still hitting the trails! I remember it from the forums years ago.
Thanks! Not hitting the trails as much as I would like, but still doing my best to. Covid has led me to tackle quite a few projects on it and it is on full time camp/off road duty now. Don't ever think I will part with it (owned it since new and still only have around 90k miles on it).
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
Load it up and put larger tires on it... If you don't like how it performs, regear it or increase the HP (or both).
 
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