Do you regret buying a base model truck?

Todd n Natalie

Observer
I configured an STX yesterday, and you need to choose the STX "Sport" seats to get the center console. There should be four options, bench and console for base and the same for STX "Sport". Differing color packages I think.
ooooh.... I didn't scroll down far enough to see the 2nd bucket seat option.
 

Oilbrnr

Active member
Adding factory remote start would be cool. Are you saying that those features can’t be added without the 8.2 screen added? Or just the ones related to climate control, voice control etc?
I'm pretty positive that the 8.2 is a requirement for some mods like the single zone auto climate control and I wouldn't doubt for the remote start, but with some poking around on other forums you could find out.

Couple of other things I forgot to mention, you can directly swap out the instrument cluster for the 7" EVIC that comes in the highest trim and I added the Homelink roof console to control my gate and garage door openers.

If you have a good boneyard nearby, you can pick up most of these pieces pretty easy or there is always ebay.
 

jbaucom

New member
If you have to ask that question, then a base model truck may not be for you. Only you know which features you want in a vehicle. Once you make that list, then you can narrow down the trims that fit your needs and land on the best option. New base model trucks (especially crew cabs) have features equivalent to a mid-level trim from 10 years ago. Feature creep makes it easy to buy more equipment than you really care about in a new vehicle, especially if you continue to trade-up for the same trim level each time.

I drive a F150 STX, and it suits my wants almost perfectly. It had all of the features I was looking for that are expensive or difficult to add, and I filled in the gaps myself with easy to add accessories. For me, a vehicle must have power windows, mirrors, and locks, tilt and cruise, factory dark tint rear windows, alloy wheels, remote entry, and sufficient interior storage (console, storage armrest, underseat storage, etc). For the truck, I also wanted 4WD, locking differential, towing package, skid plates, and extended range fuel tank (36 gal). I don't care about driving nannies (lane keep assist, adaptive cruise control, etc) and do not want sensors in the bumpers. Many mid-level trims come with these features as "standard" in their equipment groups. I got all of that except the skid plates, which I added myself with a combination of OEM take-off engine, transfer case, and fuel tank plates and an RCI transmission skid plate. Rubber floors would've been nice instead of carpet - I bought rubber floor liners to cover all of the carpet, front and rear. I'm indifferent toward the color matched bumpers - I would have preferred chrome to ward off scratches, or plain black painted to make repainting easier (no color matching) when they're chipped and scratched enough to need it.

The trucks I had prior to this F150 STX were: 2014 GMC Sierra SLE, 2007 Nissan Titan SE, and a 2005 F150 XLT. They were all mid-level trims, and this STX has everything (and more) that those trucks had, except for a power driver's seat and the pretty aluminum trim on the GMC dash. The only feature I really miss from that "nicer" GMC are the corner bumper steps.
 

MR. ED

Observer
I do...had a few electric gremlins in the past. I found a fleet truck a few years ago and thought that manual windows and locks would be a good idea. Not so, can’t reach over and roll it down while driving, got to stretch across to open the door lock. I’m use to it now, but .......
 

MTVR

Well-known member
Look at it this way- a loaded F150 costs more than a not-loaded F750. So when you buy all that foofy stuff, are you really upgrading, or are you actually downgrading?
 

MTVR

Well-known member
The "more options is better for resale" thing is utter hogwash.

It's a lie that car salesmen tell gullible buyers, to trick them into spending tens of thousands of dollars more, for the same car.

It's a lie that customers tell themselves, to justify having spent more, for the convenience of taking home the option-bloated model sitting on the dealer's lot, instead of saving a ton of money by ordering exactly what they wanted.

And it's just not true- people who are not good at math, see that heavily-optioned used cars sell for more, and assume that means that means that heavily-optioned cars are a better value. But almost all cars depreciate, so the more a car costs when new, the more you're going to lose when you sell it, all things being equal. If a $60,000 F150 depreciates 50%, that's a $30,000 loss, but if a $30,000 F150 depreciates 50%, that's only a $15,000 loss. Bonus points for paying more in interest to finance a greater loss.

Besides, who are you buying it for- you, or the next owner?
 
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MTVR

Well-known member
Keep these principles in mind when shopping across brands, too.

The 5-passenger 161hp FWD Hyundai Nexo Limited costs thousands more than the 5-passenger 348hp AWD Porsche Macan S.

Do you think people are going to flag you down at stop lights to enthusiastically proclaim "Nice Hyundai!" to you?
 
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Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
I used to eschew features like AC and power windows because I believed "they are more likely to fail." I even lived in North Carolina for 6 years driving a vehicle with no AC (1990 Mitsubishi Montero.)

That was kind of stupid on my part. The worst was coming back from a military school in July of 1993. I had to drive from Southern Arizona to Fort Bragg, NC in mid Summer, and I only had 2 1/2 days to do it. First day (the half day) I drove from Fort Huachuca (Sierra Vista) AZ to Pecos TX, 512 miles, and got to a rest area about 11:00 at night. Slept in the truck and woke up around 5:00 AM, then drove from Pecos, TX to Tuscaloosa, AL (1,011) miles the next day. It was absolutely miserable. I was stripped down to just shorts and flip-flops, with all 4 windows down, driving 70 mph and unable to even listen to the stereo because of the wind noise, but that was the only way I could drive. Rolled into Tuscaloosa near midnight and slept for another 4 hours or so before I tackled the last 600 miles to Fayette-Nam. It's surprising to me (in retrospect) that I didn't sell the Montero then for something with AC, but I kept it another 6 years until 1999.

I bought a Ranger (2wd) in 1999 that was the first vehicle I ever owned with AC. What a game changer! In the Summer of 2002 I had to go from Laramie, WY to Bragg for another school and the difference between the two trips was startling. The trip from Laramie (also in July) was so pleasant and enjoyable as compared to my 1993 trip that the difference was incredible. Cool and comfortable with the windows up, listening to music and sipping a cool drink. I'd do it again in a heartbeat. And all because of AC.

Of course, any more AC is part of the "base model" package anyway, so it's probably not relevant here, but it answers the question 'do you regret buying a base model' in that case as a resounding YES!
 

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Shovel

Dreaming Ape
Base models are all I'll buy at this point, I've bought loaded models (including twice brand new) and I hated them. Built in nav is awful compared to a dedicated Garmin, sunroofs are a waste of everything, leather is uncomfortable, 3-knob climate control is the pinnacle of UX design, all built-in infotainment systems without exception are worse than mid-level aftermarket versions.

My most recent brand new purchase was a USFS-spec Tradesman Ram 1500 with the V8, BW44-45 transfer case, limited slip, towing and carpet. Absolutely no other upgrades above the base specification - it even has crank windows and manual door locks.

Power windows would have been cool (in more ways than one) but I have no other regrets about how it's specified and I would not like it as much if it was a higher spec model.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
Base models really are not all that base anymore.

My Ranger is a "Custom" Basically an XL.

I have added a lot of stuff to it that was factory optional (carpet, nicer seat, premium sound with speakers behind the seats, cruise control, gathering parts to add A/C etc) Heck it even has satellite radio and a compass/temp mirror.

But the most bottom of the barrel truck sold today has all that standard or close to it.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
Base models are all I'll buy at this point, I've bought loaded models (including twice brand new) and I hated them. Built in nav is awful compared to a dedicated Garmin, sunroofs are a waste of everything, leather is uncomfortable, 3-knob climate control is the pinnacle of UX design, all built-in infotainment systems without exception are worse than mid-level aftermarket versions.

My most recent brand new purchase was a USFS-spec Tradesman Ram 1500 with the V8, BW44-45 transfer case, limited slip, towing and carpet. Absolutely no other upgrades above the base specification - it even has crank windows and manual door locks.

Power windows would have been cool (in more ways than one) but I have no other regrets about how it's specified and I would not like it as much if it was a higher spec model.
How do you go about purchasing a USFS fleet truck?
 

Redheddedwonder

Active member
I'm pretty positive that the 8.2 is a requirement for some mods like the single zone auto climate control and I wouldn't doubt for the remote start, but with some poking around on other forums you could find out.

Couple of other things I forgot to mention, you can directly swap out the instrument cluster for the 7" EVIC that comes in the highest trim and I added the Homelink roof console to control my gate and garage door openers.

If you have a good boneyard nearby, you can pick up most of these pieces pretty easy or there is always ebay.
Thanks for the info! this is similar to what I would want to do. Some features but not all that come with the higher packages and price tags
 

MTVR

Well-known member
Yeah, why spend thousands on NAV, especially when the maps in it are gonna be out of date by next year? I'm not gonna get lost on my way to work, home, or the market.

Before I retired, I just suction-cupped a $79 Garmin to the windshield of my patrol car, and that worked great.

On the rare occasion that I need navigation help nowadays, I either use my phone, or drag out my Garmin. When we travel in Europe, I just rent a micro SD card with Europe on it for my Garmin...
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
Yeah, why spend thousands on NAV, especially when the maps in it are gonna be out of date by next year? I'm not gonna get lost on my way to work, home, or the market.

Before I retired, I just suction-cupped a $79 Garmin to the windshield of my patrol car, and that worked great.

On the rare occasion that I need navigation help nowadays, I either use my phone, or drag out my Garmin. When we travel in Europe, I just rent a micro SD card with Europe on it for my Garmin...

My wifes Fusion has the built in navigation, my truck uses Android auto and Google maps/Waze... My trucks is in all ways better, with the one exception being if I am in West Texas and haven't had cell signal for a while. Then the built in navigation has an advantage.
 
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