Do you feel the need to have a weapon when camping

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Joanne

Adventurer
I spend a lot of time wandering around in the desert looking for old mines, often traveling alone. As a solo woman, you bet I carry. Interesting thing though with the places I go and the people I meet, folks are more likely to ask me how I like my pistol than they are to be ruffled by it. I also think a lot of them understand why I carry.

Joanne
 

Dalko43

Explorer
New Yorkers don't carry guns,..
New York state residents do carry firearms. They're allowed to openly carry weapons when afield.

Also they're allowed to concealed carry if they submit the right paperwork.

If by 'New Yorkers' you were referring to NY City residents, then yes there are a lot more restrictions on what they can do.
 

k9lestat

Expedition Leader
When I was stationed at ft drum NY I found it odd about these rules of hunting with rifles. As I recall the majority was shotguns only with few or any exceptions.

Sent from my QMV7A using Tapatalk
 

P2W

Observer
New York state residents do carry firearms. They're allowed to openly carry weapons when afield.

Also they're allowed to concealed carry if they submit the right paperwork.

If by 'New Yorkers' you were referring to NY City residents, then yes there are a lot more restrictions on what they can do.
Yes, NYC
 

Longrange308

Adventurer
I went camping last weekend up in the Salmon-Challis Nat. Forest, beside the usual camp stuff, you bet I had a .357 on my hip the majority of the time, I had a .454 in the tent and a .35rem lever gun in camp. Overkill? Probably quite a bit of it, however I was in Wolf/Cougar/Bear country and I had my 70lb pit-lab mix and my 4month old 25lb Weimaraner puppy with me. I know how territorial wolves can be and while I feel comfortable taking a shot with my 4" revolver at a wolf as it stands off with my dogs, my fiancé isn't, hence the rifle. Its all about being prepared. Once my puppy is fully grown, I will feel more comfortable, but will still prepare for the worst possible outcome.

I fully well understand that my preparedness level verges on overkill, but that applies to more than just firearms. I typically bring 3 or 4 utility knives for different functions, a backpacking stove that can burn anything from white gas to diesel and gasoline in addition to my Coleman 2 burner camp stove, lifestraw in addition to my MSR Waterworks filter, etc., etc. I feel much better being prepared for anything that I reasonably feel could happen and can prepare for vs. being unprepared for what I fathomed might happen, but shrugged off for the sheer value of a little convenience.

I don't typically criticize people that don't carry, that is their choice. Doesn't mean that I shouldn't prepare to the level that I feel comfortable. Different people have different comfort levels, I have found mine.
 

demonslaer

Observer
I thought this was about taking a gun camping and yes somtimes up to 3 or more .. weapons I take a knife , axe,cs shovel,tire iron,lug wrench,mag light,tent stake, (anything can be a weapon)
 

MOguy

Explorer
I thought this was about taking a gun camping and yes somtimes up to 3 or more .. weapons I take a knife , axe,cs shovel,tire iron,lug wrench,mag light,tent stake, (anything can be a weapon)
But you have to be much closer to what is attacking you if you use those things for weapons.
 

TheSurvivalist

New member
I always have a handgun on me when camping and either a shotgun or rifle in the truck.

I'm usually more concerned about 2-legged critters. You meet some shady people in the woods sometimes.
 

Blind_Io

Adventurer
Sometimes that is true, honestly though, the vast majority of people I meet in the backcountry are either indifferent and want their solitude (which I can understand) or very friendly and helpful. I can only think of a few times I've met rude or shady people out there, and even then it was usually just poor etiquette, like walking through the middle of my camp.
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
You meet some shady people in the woods sometimes.
I think this is highly influenced by where you live, the areas you frequent and other variables. I spend about 30-35 nights a year in the backcountry and have for the better part of twenty years. I can't think of a single negative encounter. I can however remember scads of opportunities to meet some great people.

Even the four drunk Russians that camped next to me in Iceland were super nice. :)
 

Dalko43

Explorer
I never look at hiking or back-country camping as increasing your odds of running into a life-or-death situation (either man-made or natural). Rather I analyze the consequences of having a dangerous encounter out in the wild.

You get wounded while walking out in town (sprained ankle, sickness, someone assaulting you) you're a lot more likely to have help readily available or a short phone call away.

You get wounded out in the woods, you're potentially hours, sometimes even days away from any sort of help.

I've never been paranoid while camping in the wilderness, but I am aware that the consequences of getting injured out there are potentially much more severe. Just like a lot of other things I carry (first aid kit, compass, survival knife) a firearm is simply another tool at your disposal should you encounter a 'worst case' scenario. That being said, if someone chooses to go into the wild without a firearm, that's fine too...every one has different comfort levels and preferences when it comes to that sort of thing.
 
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