Do people use multiple shore power plugs?

OllieChristopher

Active member
Curious if people use more than one kind.

Never stayed at an RV park.

I was looking at two 120v receptacles, then just have a few different xxxV / xxAMP adapters for whatever is there.

Does that make sense, or is there some electrical voodoo reason that is a bad idea....
It kind of makes sense.

One adapter I highly recommend to have on hand at home or if you are RVing is two 25-50 foot 110v male plugs and cords put into a female 208 volt singe phase plug. This way you have 208 power in a pinch for RV's welders, driers, etc.

These are not a off the shelf unit but are very simple to make yourself using two 10/3 or 12/3 extension cords and a 208 single phase plug. Any Home Depot will have it.

Main thing to remember is in order for it to work you have to plug each 110 plug into different circuits. You will be amazed at how handy these are. For RVrs they are worth their weight in gold at campsites or places with only 110 plugs. Or if that hookup site has a broken box.

With two small inverter generators you now have a nice single phase 208 plug to use.
 

67cj5

Man On a Mission
Instead of worrying about it why not go to an RV company and ask for the correct leads to suit the country you are in, Job Done.
 

Verkstad

Raggarkung
No,
Those ’splitter adaptors’ shown have no ’15 amp circuit’ to connect to.
Each of their 15/20 amp receptacles are directly connected to a 30 or 50 amp circuit that its plugged into.
It works but not very safe. Especially for people of low electrical understanding.

Here is what I mean.
Taking the power from these into two 120v receptacles, depending on what is there
The two 120v 15 amp sockets are likely sharing the 15 amp circuit so your not doing anything except likely popping the 15amp breaker.
 
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Verkstad

Raggarkung
Over here the standard household max Amps is 13A = 3120w.
I always thought Jolly ’ol England household normally has 230V singlephase ? What means try as one might using some hazardous dualplug contraption, 230V is all that you get. (Disregard 115V building sites..)
Btw,
Probably the worlds safest design of plugs & receptacles too !
 

67cj5

Man On a Mission
I always thought Jolly ’ol England household normally has 230V singlephase ? What means try as one might using some hazardous dualplug contraption, 230V is all that you get. (Disregard 115V building sites..)
Btw,
Probably the worlds safest design of plugs & receptacles too !
It's funny I have always thought it was 240v but they claim its 230v but when you measure it it is always 240v,

The wall sockets have a lever that when the Earth pin goes In it then opens the Holes for the Live and the Neutral pins on the plug, plus you can change the fuses on the plug, which range from 1A, 3A, 5A, 7 or 8A, 10A and 13A
 

OllieChristopher

Active member
So how many amps at 208V can you get from such a contraption ?
It depends on how many amps the outlets are. Most standard household outlets are 15 - 30 amps. I always made mine out of minimum 12/3. To be totally safe then 10/3 is a better choice. The cord I described is very useful and served me well when I was in the temporary power industry in the 90's. We used them mostly for daisy chaining GFI boxes from small 25KW generators that were pulling light loads at construction sites.

In the spirit of Expedition Portal and its user base this cord is more useful for someone who has a rig that needs to be plugged into a 208 single phase source that may not be available.

Again the key is to make sure it's plugged into to separate circuits. And that is very simple to check. After plugging into the receptacles measure across the hots at the female end. If the voltage is 0 then it's on the same circuit. 240 or so then you are good to go.
 

jkam

nomadic man
My RV has 30 amp service. I have a plug that reduces the 30 amp plug to 15 amps.
I can plug into any standard plug with it. That allows me to use my AC when I am at a relatives house.
I can also use the fridge on electric without blowing the breaker. Try and use the microwave and it pops.
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
Academically speaking, AC voltage rating partly comes down to how you measure it. For AC power, there are different methods for rating the voltage of the sine wave: Peak-to-Peak, Root-Mean-Square, Average Voltage, etc.

Which gets used depends mostly on who you are talking to and what that person plans to do with the energy. An electrical engineer, who is likely to care about power, will probably use RMS voltage, as that more accurately captures the area under the curve. (This is the value most directly analogous to a DC voltage.)


Couple the different methods with the real-world variability of power delivery at a distance, and the number could be +/- 30% or more.
 

OllieChristopher

Active member
An electrical engineer, who is likely to care about power, will probably use RMS voltage, as that more accurately captures the area under the curve. (This is the value most directly analogous to a DC voltage.)
And if you really want to mess things up try using North American 60 HZ frequencies on delicate audio and video equipment. When I was in the generator industry we had to adjust our HZ on the generators to accommodate foreign performers equipment. It was a very difficult process to get it just right to avoid feedback and buzz.
 

billiebob

Well-known member
No,
Those ’splitter adaptors’ shown have no ’15 amp circuit’ to connect to.
Each of their 15/20 amp receptacles are directly connected to a 30 or 50 amp circuit that its plugged into.
It works but not very safe. Especially for people of low electrical understanding.
I disagree. Makes no difference how much power you connect to. Your unit should have a main breaker and sub circuit breakers protecting the truck and appliances. Which is exactly how homes work too.
On the other end, if the power supply is 15amp and you are drawing 30amps. That 15amp service supply breaker will give you a black out.
 

Verkstad

Raggarkung
As mentioned ”a person of low electrical understanding”...
Nothing was mentioned of using one of those adaptors to supply only another loadcenter or otherwise OCPD loads.
At a campground, building site or somebodys house, provide only one or two receptacles and see how much stuff they plug into it.
Another example.
Using a common 30A to 15/20A adaptor somebody plugs in a 30A RV to a 20A device whats supplied by a 50A circuit.
RV is now connected to a 50A circuit thru wiring and device what should only carry 20A.
For fun, Lets add real life scenario of ampacity reduction.
Cheezy asia made adaptors, tarnish from being outdoors, plus loose tension from hundreds of mating cycles, ignorance of user...
I think a points made.
I disagree. Makes no difference how much power you connect to. Your unit should have a main breaker and sub circuit breakers protecting the truck and appliances. Which is exactly how homes work too.
On the other end, if the power supply is 15amp and you are drawing 30amps. That 15amp service supply breaker will give you a black out.
 
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