Democratic Republic of Congo: Lubumbashi to Kinshasa

Andrewhollo

New member
I'm also new here having come via Jalopnik. Read this on and off planes and in hotel rooms over 48 hrs, in between bouts of work. This read like a suspense thriller .... Loved the cliffhangers.

Having travelled extensively in Asia (but not Africa) I also welcome your remarks about not distorting local economies by a misguided belief that we should pay "fair" ie Western prices.

Looking forward to the final comments, even though I'll never own an Off road vehicle and hate camping out. marvelous writing; honest reportage.

Best wishes from a dedicated urban dweller who's only driven a car on a dirt road a handful of times in his life,

Andrew
 

zukinut

New member
Josephine and Frederik'

I don't even remember how I found this forum. I stumbled upon it and I had to finish reading how your adventure finished. Started reading last night and finished this morning. This is an adventure I could only dream of doing. Thank you for the great write up for I was able to do it vicariously though you.

You write up was very impressive. I hope that you are thinking of writing a book for I would be inline waiting to buy and read it.

Sincerely,

Dave
 

ocdiver

New member
Just signed up to say thank you for sharing your incredible journey. You are an inspiration to many and have us glued to our computers (im)patiently waiting for your next post. :) Thank you for taking the time to share your story with the rest of us.
 

zeroland

Adventurer
F &J: so I'm looking through your trip report, culling pictures to sketch, and notice a serious omission ;)- there's not a single photograph with your truck in 'Camp' mode- ie with the tent deployed.

Guess you were always in the "being stared at" mode and couldn't afford the obligatory poser shot. :)

That's an awesome sketch. thanks for taking the time to share.
 

Apexbasher

New member
I will now add MY thanks to the throng! What an epic story you have to tell, Frederik. Like many of the folks who have posted previously I feel I have lived a bit of this with you, thanks to your wonderful description of places and people, and your firm grasp of English.

I assume that in the two years since this journey you both have fully recovered from any maladies you developed while globe trekking. If I may be so bold... What were they? How did you prepare for illness? and What was your final recuperation time?

Thanks again for such an inspiring tale of woe, misery, ingenuity, and perseverance in the face of adversity! Many Happy Returns!
 
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Josephine

New member
By the way, it was very unexpected and funny to see the cover of her notepad in one of the photos, that Russian notepad in the middle of the jungle somewhere in DRC, somehow it looked surreal that way if you get what I mean.
Being Russian I would be particularly interested to hear about your experience while travelling through Russia.
Hi!
Travelling trough Russia (Siberia) was really one of the highlights of our trip thanks to all the friendly Russians. We would love to visit again one day...

Thanks everybody for the interest and great comments in our story!

Josephine
 

David Harris

Expedition Leader
Hi!
Travelling trough Russia (Siberia) was really one of the highlights of our trip thanks to all the friendly Russians. We would love to visit again one day...

Thanks everybody for the interest and great comments in our story!

Josephine
Wow, Josephine! Glad to have you join us! Welcome!

Regards,

David
 

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RadioBaobab

Adventurer
and notice a serious omission ;)- there's not a single photograph with your truck in 'Camp' mode- ie with the tent deployed.

Guess you were always in the "being stared at" mode and couldn't afford the obligatory poser shot. :)
Funny but you are right, we have very few picturs of our tent deployed. I guess it's a bit like taking pictures of your own house... I have never done that either. Strange...

Here's one from another country (Benin) in a more relaxed mode ;-)



Those are some very cool drawings by the way! Thanks!
 

David Harris

Expedition Leader
Funny but you are right, we have very few picturs of our tent deployed. I guess it's a bit like taking pictures of your own house... I have never done that either. Strange...

Here's one from another country (Benin) in a more relaxed mode ;-)



Those are some very cool drawings by the way! Thanks!
Iconic photo . . . Somehow I have a feeling that might end up on the cover of Overland Journal . . .

Thanks,

David
 

RadioBaobab

Adventurer
Thanks to everybody for leaving comments, we really appreciate it. The amount of attention this trip report is getting is insane!

A quick round of answers to some questions. Sorry for not replying to everybody personally, we do read everything!

I have a few questions ....
- this being Africa I never heard about you encountering wildlife. I know in one of the posts you wrote about a local longing for times of old when they were roaming, but is it really to the point that there are "none"?
Not "none", but it's close. The picture many people have of wildlife roaming everywhere is a picture drawn by documentaries in the wildparks of Eastern and Southern Africa. Most of Central (and western) Africa has very little wildlife left. I mean the traditional, spectacular wildlife (lions, elephant, ..). Congo is the only country in the world where one can still encounter Okapi's and is home to some of the last remaining Gorilla's. But the bulk of animals is gone. Eaten, poached, ... . And what remains stays well clear of humans.

One comment -- I think your LC deserves a name. I defer to your preference, but "Rocinante" comes to mind. Even more than Don Q's steed, your LC proved itself greater than its simple origin...
Thanks for the tip, it would be an apt name indeed. But, to me, it feels funny to name cars. I will explain it a bit more when I talk about the car and its equipment (soon).

One question- around that one bog hole with the palm tree in the center- is it easier to cut it down or work around it?
In that particular case I think we drove around it. Cut a way trough the bush. It really depends on the situation. Sometimes it is quicker and easier to just drive trough the bog. Sometimes it is easier to create a detour. Sometimes one takes the wrong decision too ;-)

Your trip has changed you for the better.
Thanks I guess ;-) I like to believe that too. Although I have the feeling I have only had a little glimpse of the world. It made me even more curious. It made me realize I do not understand most of what I have seen. It gave me many answers, but even more new questions. Often I am jealous about people who are content with their little world, often not bigger then their own town (I am talking about most people in the 'first world'), oblivious to what is happening in the rest of the world. It make life so much simpler!

Just the other night I spoke with her about what she couldn't live without seeing, and where she absolutely _had_ to go on that trip. It excited us both; it was a conversation we hadn't touched on in a few months and we had it because our dream was invigorated by the telling of yours.
You have no idea how happy and proud that makes us. We sincerely hope you make 'your trip' one day and enjoy every minute of it!

My question (maybe for that q&a session), did you consider driving in reverse when the rear axle broke?
It crossed our mind briefly, but I did not really seriously consider it. Experiments like this take time and effort, so we only tried 'new things' when we believed it had a fair chance of succes. If it were just a straight hill, sure. But the tracks was often very narrow with little room for driving mistakes. And mistakes were always punished hard by getting stuck or tipping over.

I assume that in the two years since this journey you both have fully recovered from any maladies you developed while globe trekking. If I may be so bold... What were they? How did you prepare for illness? and What was your final recuperation time?
Nothing serious. The usual 'traveller problems' occured frequently and sometimes for long periods. A few cuts and bruises from time to time. We had an extensive medical kit with us, but we barely used anything from it. In general I would say we were much healthier while travelling then we were/are at home. The outdoor life and lack of stress I guess.
a
Don't forget there is this live session next Sunday. We are curious to how that will work out!
 

Overland Hadley

on a journey
Hi!
Travelling trough Russia (Siberia) was really one of the highlights of our trip thanks to all the friendly Russians. We would love to visit again one day...

Thanks everybody for the interest and great comments in our story!

Josephine
Welcome Josephine!

I enjoyed the sketches that you did. They added to the feel of this report.

Again, props to both of you for not only doing this trip, but taking the time to share it with us. (Us being over 500,000 views!)
 

BillWms01

New member
Frederik & Josephine, what an absolutely captivating adventure! I have so thoroughly enjoyed reading it.

I saw a link on another site, and then I couldn't stop reading your posts. I had to register on this site, if for nothing else than to salute you.

I came here thinking I'd read of a Land Cruiser enthusiast with a nice trip report. What I found was a pair of true adventurers who risked their personal safety to live out a dream. A true lesson in African history, the human will, philosophy of dealing with people and personal triumph.

If you write a book (and, you're certainly capable!), I certainly buy a copy!

------------------------------
BillWms01
'04 UZJ100 Land Cruiser
'08 FJ Cruiser
 

Mamontof

Explorer
Maybe it was this....

You guys did not hear anything different.... did you?.
Conspiracy and all between

That particulate photo have a GPS track location , nay simple to search

geophysics ....as result....no mining or some Valuables in that region (for

farmer create that concentration camp boarder .....it simple expensive )

What make a sense , a farmer simple do not like passing true guest - and that a reason to build that type of bridge ( it was war for many years , farmer simple try keep a way big tonnage truck)
 
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