Coyote(s) with mange....what to do?

perterra

Adventurer
Actually, the main reason coyotes spread out of the southwestern part of North America into other areas is because the wolves were eradicated in those other areas; coyotes simply moved in to assume that predatory role.


Farmers/ranchers have historically had a very antagonistic view of coyotes, and other predators, because those animals often posed a very direct threat to their livestock (and financial welfare). They still do to this day, but our views and techniques for wildlife management have evolved over the years.

Honestly, killing a few coyotes (whether it be as part of a humane effort, population culling, or general sport hunting) doesn't have much affect on the overall population. Coyotes are doing fine in North America; hunting and trapping efforts don't pose a threat.

They not just doing fine, they be thrivin LOL

I mean if ya just want to kill something, go for it. But it may well survive.
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
They not just doing fine, they be thrivin LOL

I mean if ya just want to kill something, go for it. But it may well survive.
"Being a private property owner in Colorado It appears I can deal with these animals without license/permit but was curious if there is any thing others have done to help these poor beasts other then dispatching them. (Make my wife happy) Thanks!"

For clarification, the orginal question was due to my lack of knowledge about how to handle a coyote with mange and my options, not "ya just want to kill something".
 

MOguy

Explorer
"Being a private property owner in Colorado It appears I can deal with these animals without license/permit but was curious if there is any thing others have done to help these poor beasts other then dispatching them. (Make my wife happy) Thanks!"

For clarification, the orginal question was due to my lack of knowledge about how to handle a coyote with mange and my options, not "ya just want to kill something".
Where I am at you just want to kill something if it is a wild pig or coyote and for many a mountain lion.
 

thedavidzoo

New member
We had some poor foxes with mange coming into our yard in an urban area. Our local animal welfare org directed me to a group of rescue folks who gave me 2 vials of ivermectin and 2 syringes. I donated to their rescue site online later. I was instructed to inject a chicken leg with one dose and follow up with a second dose in 2 weeks. I used cooked meatballs from cheap ground beef instead. I watched the foxes' patterns and saw them eat the bait. It also gets rid of other parasites such as worms. You got to get the timing about right otherwise a raccoon or such will eat it, or the flies.
Unfortunately, we were moving and sold the house and I never found out if the foxes recovered.
 

waveslider

Outdoorsman
BritKLR, its a hard pill to swallow but proven science would dictate that your best choice of action would be to dispatch any and all mangy coyotes and foxes.

I applaud your desire to do the right thing and in many cases a "run to the rifle" isn't always correct. Do your own research to refute many of the claims made here. Not only is mange a virtual death sentence for these critters (exceptions do happen but most coyotes/foxes will die from mange) - but more importantly as a pack animal they are very susceptible and likely to spread the disease so the sooner you remove the infected animals the more likely the pack will survive.

In effect, you ARE doing your part for conservation and prey/predator balance by removing those already infected.

Remember, we're the only predator with a conscience. Mother Nature is far less understanding.
 
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BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
BritKLR, its a hard pill to swallow but proven science would dictate that your best choice of action would be to dispatch any and all mangy coyotes and foxes.

I applaud your desire to do the right thing and in many cases a "run to the rifle" isn't always correct. Do your own research to refute many of the claims made here. Not only is mange a virtual death sentence for these critters (exceptions do happen but most coyotes/foxes will die from mange) - but more importantly as a pack animal they are very susceptible and likely to spread the disease so the sooner you remove the infected animals the more likely the pack will survive.

In effect, your ARE doing your part for conservation and prey/predator balance by removing those already infected.

Remember, we're the only predator with a conscience. Mother Nature is far less understanding.
Well said. Thanks for the advice. I've been a life long outdoorsman and hunter with the greatest respect for our wildlife, but also have no issues with responsible hunting or humane disposal (not just killing something...) of injuried wildlife (30 years of dispatching Missouri white tail versus cars, rabied raccoons, possums,etc...) But, I can say I never had to deal with a coyote, so I was looking for some advice. Which I believe I have gotten, both from this forum and Colorado CPW.

Besides, our animals were here long before we got here, and hopefully they'll be here long after I'm gone....

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perterra

Adventurer
"Being a private property owner in Colorado It appears I can deal with these animals without license/permit but was curious if there is any thing others have done to help these poor beasts other then dispatching them. (Make my wife happy) Thanks!"

For clarification, the orginal question was due to my lack of knowledge about how to handle a coyote with mange and my options, not "ya just want to kill something".
I should have been a littler clearer in my comment. It wasnt pointed at you or Dalko, or anyone for that matter. It was pointed more to a general mindset I see in regards to coyotes or really any predator around here. Here they are usually killed because they are coyotes. We clear cut tracts in the woods, build houses and populate the place with free running cats and little dogs behind short fences then raise holy hell when one of the original residents of the woods snatches old puss-n-boots off the porch.

As others have hinted at, everything is connected. I applaud your trying to do the right thing.
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Let's not get started about invasive feral cats.....the thread will devolve quickly (by my own hand most likely)
No such thing as stray dogs or feral cats in the mountains.......Up here, they're known as "Hors d'oeuvres" for the true predators (4 legged or winged) or the environment. After living in the mountains now for over 7 years I still do not understand why people think it's normal or natural or good for a domesticated animal to be let loose into the forest. The most recent "lost" poster in the Post Office and Coffee Shops was offering $5,000 for a lost dog that they let out and it never returned.
 
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Pacific Northwest yetti

Expedition Medic
Sounds like you have all the options in front of you at this point.


I grew up farming and ranching, Ivomec will work. we gave it to our, horses ( via food) Cows and sheep IM ( with a shot )

It crosses the blood brain barrier in some breeds of dogs,( Collies )and is fatal. can also be purchased at almost any farm and ranch store. But can only speak to states i have bought it in, in such a manor ( Wyoming, Missouri, Washington and Oregon) And amazon -https://smile.amazon.com/Merial-000683-Ivomec-Parasiticide-Injection/dp/B00076HT92/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=ivomec&qid=1556033469&s=gateway&sr=8-2

Breeds it causes harm - https://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/toxicity/c_dg_ivermectin_toxicity

if its a risk to your critters, may change the way you decide to act. Dispatch, by your own hand, or the act of nothing. Or some Ivomec. The dosage is bout 1cc/100#

It has also been and is being used, in other parts of the world on humans.
 

waveslider

Outdoorsman
PNY,

I may be misunderstanding your post so apologies if I am. However, if you are advocating for the inoculation or administering of drugs to wild animals then I would argue that's as loony bin an idea as neutering feral cats and then releasing them back into the wild (an action that I prefer were illegal with strong penalties). If you are inferring that its advisable to treat your pets and livestock for potential disease then I guess that goes without saying.

The story recounted above about feeding Ivermectin to urban coyotes and foxes via injected chicken parts or whatever - because it was suggested by the local 'animal welfare' advocates - shows just how high people will fall off the logic and science wagon to meet their proclivities. The majority (not all) "Animal Welfare Groups' are anything but and your best source of information is your states Fish and Game commission seeing as we pay them to do this very job.

Urban environments are more challenging and are normally left to experts - a quick search for ADC, Animal Damage Control or Nuisance Animal Control will get you to someone (again) who does this for a living. However, if you call them and tell them you want something relocated or NOT dispatched once caught you will probably not get anywhere. In most states its highly recommended that they dispatch caught critters and in other states they are forbidden to relocate or release rabies vector critters such as Coons, Skunks and Possums EDIT: Removed Grinners due to the fact that they are NOT considered rabies vector animals in many/most cases.
 
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Pacific Northwest yetti

Expedition Medic
....all I did was provide information, and resources...from my experience as a livestock owner, as well as 10+ yrs as a medic.

was not trying to lean either direction.

Personally i would dispatch the sick animal, to prevent spread.
 

PPCLI_Jim

Adventurer
I'm a bit of a farm boy , but also raised in an urban area. I really hate to recommend putting them down but that is my thought though, occasionally that is the best course. Up here in the central BC area some moose ,deer and elk get a massive amounts of ticks[+100's]. This weakens the immunity systems and after a while it gets to the point they weigh about 1/3-12 of what they should. I called the CON O'S and they asked me If I could put it down as it was the third report on it, and they could never get there in time. As a hunter I hate the thought but did it and waited with it till they took it away.
 

ruger1

Observer
As stated by other Ivermectin works. We had foxes around our farm with mange and I hard boiled a bunch eggs then injected them with 5cc each and put them at the den entrance and did this over a months time and they did clear up. Coyotes? I'd probably not taken the effort because we have way too many.
 
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