Corrosion on Campteq or Alu-Cab Pop-Up Systems

SoyBoy

Member
It was pointed out to me - so I thought I would ask if anybody knows of possible corrosion issues that may have occurred because of the 2 metals in contact after having one of these pop-ups installed over the course of several years?

Also any issues with water or dust getting in.
 

T-Willy

Well-known member
Our Campteq rests on a rubber gasket, so the aluminum is not in contact with any steel. No corrosion and no dust or water getting in. You'll probably have better luck with feedback on Campteq on the Mud forum.
 

LandCruiserPhil

Expedition Leader
Our Campteq rests on a rubber gasket, so the aluminum is not in contact with any steel. No corrosion and no dust or water getting in. You'll probably have better luck with feedback on Campteq on the Mud forum.
Several installs have been done with no gasket. One that comes to mind has was done ~8 years ago and has been all over the world without issue.
 

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SoyBoy

Member
THX Phil & Willy. Now that I have the pop-top concern to bed - I can move on.

So - For South American solo travel I am thinking of either getting a Troopy and not have a pop-top as it has plenty of room inside. Or an 80/81 and install a pop-top. Chances are I will be in a room half the time down there. I'm thinking that I would love the Camptek more - but how would I know for sure. (I know Alu-cab makes one for the Troop)
Any thoughts?
 

T-Willy

Well-known member
For platform, it depends on your needs. The top-line differences are that the Troopy will be roomier, but the 80 has a more plush ride and is more capable offroad (rear coils).

If you go the 80 Campteq route, you'd then have to decide whether or not to cut the roof. I left mine uncut for a variety of reasons. Others have cut their roofs and done full build-outs--check out the Dirt Sunrise build, for example. Again, it depends on your needs. That said, I could not be happier with the Campteq pop top, it's simple, bomber, highly functional and transforms travel.
 

SoyBoy

Member
Yes - I have seen the Dirt Sunrise truck tour. Interesting - so the Campteq on yours is just glued to top on your vehicle - So no access from the inside. How much difference in functionality is your setup to a hard shell RTT?
For me, the main reason to get the Camptek is to have inside access and to be able to sit upright and stand up in it. I assume most pop-ups are installed with inside access - right.
More comfort and better off-road capability would be nice.
 

T-Willy

Well-known member
Yes - I have seen the Dirt Sunrise truck tour. Interesting - so the Campteq on yours is just glued to top on your vehicle - So no access from the inside. How much difference in functionality is your setup to a hard shell RTT?
For me, the main reason to get the Camptek is to have inside access and to be able to sit upright and stand up in it. I assume most pop-ups are installed with inside access - right.
More comfort and better off-road capability would be nice.
Mine clamps directly to the rain gutters. Others have used an adhesive called Sikiflex. And yes, I think most Campteq owners cut their roofs and do integrated builds. Ours, uncut, has no inside access; access is via the rear door and hatch ladder.

Both a hardshell RTT and Campteq are functionally similar in that you can sleep upstairs with fast setup and takedown. That said, Campteq is a much more simple, study, secure, and integrated system. Its lines are perfectly tailored to the 80, so it's got a very integrated look that is far more subtle look than a separately perched RTT. If one painted the Campteq to match and used glue rather than clamps, it'd look almost factory. Its construction is vastly more sturdy than any RTT that I've seen--thick aluminum with big, bomber welds. It's lighter than most metal RTTs at ~125 lbs (if I recall), so saves payload. It lacks a wind (and branch) gap and is silent (ours deadens sound). It sits lower (less vehicle height). Its primary (rather than secondary) fastening, with the entire camper base form-fit and resting on the roof, is much more secure and is capable of carrying a massive load, 600 lbs if I recall (I use it for a photography platform and haul sea kayaks directly atop, and prefer this to the boats resting atop a double stack of racks, as with a RTT). But the Campteq can only be used on the 80, and it's a few thousand (at least) more U.S. dollars than a RTT--so buying one represents a financial commitment to the 80 Series. Whether that few thousand dollars is worth it depends on one's needs and circumstances. For us, it's been well worth it.

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C p weinberger

Active member
Short comment about platform
The troopy and 80 are even, one is not better then the other. Both have positives and negatives.
In real world driving the 80 is more comfortable and There-in lies the root problem. You drive faster then you should.
1. It beats the hell out of the vehicle.
2. You get deader quicker in accidents

In Real world experience the troopy will outlast the 80 because your body takes The beating. Take shocks and suspension parts for 80 and you’re good to go.
 

SoyBoy

Member
C p w. All good points. Probably a big drawback with the Troopy is that you just can't easily buy them. I'm guessing parts for the 80s are easier to get as well, as there may have been more of them sold worldwide. Troopy's are also meant for more weight than I will ever expect to load in it when I make the rig trip ready. Good to know nonetheless.
 

LandCruiserPhil

Expedition Leader
C p w. All good points. Probably a big drawback with the Troopy is that you just can't easily buy them. I'm guessing parts for the 80s are easier to get as well, as there may have been more of them sold worldwide. Troopy's are also meant for more weight than I will ever expect to load in it when I make the rig trip ready. Good to know nonetheless.
Truth be a Troopy is a landscaping truck everywhere else in the world but the USA. As for travel in no way does an 80 and Troopy compare in ride or comfort.
 

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